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  1. Margaret, Countess of Anjou Joan of Valois (c. 1294 – 7 March 1342) was a Countess consort of Hainaut, Holland, and Zeeland. She was the second eldest daughter of the French prince Charles, Count of Valois , and his first wife, Margaret, Countess of Anjou . [1]

    Joan of Valois, Countess of Hainaut - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_Valois,_Countess_of_Hainaut
  2. Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › Jacqueline,_Countess_of_Hainaut

    Jacqueline, of the House of Wittelsbach, was a noblewoman who ruled the counties of Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut in the Low Countries from 1417 to 1433. She was also Dauphine of France for a short time between 1415 and 1417 and Duchess of Gloucester in the 1420s, if her marriage to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, is accepted as valid. Jacqueline was born in Le Quesnoy and from her birth she was referred to as "of Holland", indicating that she was the heiress of her father's estates. Jacqueline was

  3. Joan of Valois, Countess of Hainaut - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Joan_of_Valois,_Countess

    Margaret, Countess of Anjou Joan of Valois (c. 1294 – 7 March 1342) was a Countess consort of Hainaut, Holland, and Zeeland. She was the second eldest daughter of the French prince Charles, Count of Valois , and his first wife, Margaret, Countess of Anjou . [1]

  4. Jeanne de Valois, Countess of Hainault (c.1289 - 1342 ...

    www.geni.com › people › Jeanne-de-Valois-Countess-of

    Nov 10, 2020 · [edit] Countess of HainautJoan married William III, Count of Holland and Hainaut on 23 May 1305. She was a supporter of her cousin Isabella of France in her struggle against Edward II. This brought about an alliance between Hainaut and Isabella and the English exiles, who were in opposition to the English king and his favorite, Hugh Despenser the Younger.

  5. Joan of Valois, Countess of Hainaut | Project Gutenberg Self ...

    self.gutenberg.org › Joan_of_Valois,_Countess_of_Hainaut
    • Lineage
    • Countess of Hainaut
    • Mediator
    • Issue

    Her paternal grandparents were Philip III of France and Isabella of Aragon. Her maternal grandparents were Charles II of Naples and Maria Arpad of Hungary. Joan was one of six children. In 1299, Joan's mother died, probably in childbirth, and her father married his second wife, Catherine I of Courtenay, Titular Empress of Constantinople, by whom he had four more children. He would marry his third wife, Mahaut of Châtillon, in 1308, and by her he would sire a son and three daughters, among them Isabella of Valois, who became Duchess of Bourbon, and Blanche of Valois, who married Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor.

    Joan married William III, Count of Holland and Hainaut, on 23 May 1305. She was a supporter of her cousin Isabella of France in her struggle against Edward II. In December 1325, she traveled to France to attend the funeral of her father and had talks with Isabella and Charles IV of France. This brought about an alliance between Hainaut, Isabella, and the English exiles, who were in opposition to the English king and his favorite, Hugh Despenser the Younger. Isabella's son became engaged to Joan's daughter Philippa and Isabella raised an army in their lands. It was also from there that Isabella and her lover, Roger Mortimer, began their invasion of England. In 1332, after Philippa had become queen, she arranged a wedding between Isabella's daughter Eleanor of Woodstock and Reginald II, Duke of Guelders, and she visited her daughter Philippa in England.

    After her husband died in 1337, Joan took the veil and entered into Fontenelle Abbey. In 1340, her son-in-law dealt her brother Philip a heavy blow by defeating him at sea near Sluys. Edward then went on to besiege Tournai, but was beset by financial problems. Pope Benedict XIIthen asked Joan to mediate. She first went to her brother, whom she had begged for peace. Then she went to Edward in his tent and begged him for peace as well. The pleas of their relative Joan, sent by the pope, allowed the two men to sign a truce without loss of face.

    Joan's children with William III 1. William IV of Hainaut(1307–1345) 2. John (died 1316) 3. Empress Margaret (1311–1356), married Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor 4. Queen Philippa (24 June 1314 – 1369), married king Edward III of England 5. Agnes (died 1327) 6. Johanna von Jülich (1315–1374), married William V, Duke of Jülich 7. Isabella of Hainaut (1323–1361), married Robert of Namur 8. Louis (1325–1328)

  6. Richilde, Countess of Hainaut - WIKI 2. Wikipedia Republished

    wiki2.org › en › Richilde,_Countess_of_Hainaut

    Jun 20, 2020 · Richilde, Count­ess of Mons and Hainaut (c. 1018 – 15 March 1086), was a rul­ing count­ess of Hain­aut from c. 1050 until 1076, in co-re­gency with her hus­band Bald­win VI of Flan­ders and son Bald­win II of Hain­aut. She was also count­ess of Flan­ders by mar­riage to Bald­win VI.

  7. Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Jacqueline,_Countess_of
    • History
    • Legends
    • References

    Early life. Marriage to the Duke of Touraine

    Born in the Castle of Le Quesnoy in Hainaut, Jacqueline, from her birth, was referred to as "of Holland", indicating that she was the heiress of her father's estates. She was the only daughter of William II, Duke of Bavaria (also known as William VI, Count of Holland) from his marriage with Margaret of Burgundy, daughter of Margaret III of Flanders and Philip the Bold. At the age of only 22 months (in Paris on 5 May 1403) and again at the age of five (in Compiègne on 29 June 1406), Jacqueline...

    War with John III

    After her father's death, Jacqueline was acknowledged as sovereign in Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut. However, her uncle, John III, duke of Bavaria-Straubing and bishop of Liège, also claimed Holland and Zeeland as his rightful inheritance. This reignited the civil war between the Hooks and the Codsanew. While Jacqueline was backed by the Hook party, the Cods turned towards her uncle.

    Second Marriage

    Jacqueline's position was too weak for her to hold on her own and therefore she remarried. In 1418, her uncle and guardian, John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy, arranged a marriage to her cousin, John IV, Duke of Brabant and Limbourg. However, John IV proved to be a weak political leader and he gave John III full custody over Holland and Zeeland for 12 years in 1420. After this waste of her inheritance, Jacqueline and her allies decided to dissolve the marriage. They claimed it was never vali...

    There are many legends surrounding the life of Jacqueline. The most prevalent one is her supposed secret marriage to Francis of Borssele in 1432, two years prior to their public and official wedding. This secret marriage was supposed to be the real reason why she had to give up her titles and give them to the duke of Burgundy as it would violate the regulations in the peace treaty of 1428. However, there is no evidence that such a secret marriage has ever taken place and contemporary sources only mention the rumours of an upcoming wedding between Jacqueline and Francis at the end of 1433, half a year after Jacqueline renounced her titles.

    Antheun JANSE, Een pion voor een dame. Jacoba van Beieren (1401–1436), Amsterdam, Uitgeverij Balans, 2009, 400 p. (ISBN 978-94-6003-185-4).
    D.E.H. de Boer, E.H.P. Cordfunke. "Jacoba van Beieren (1417–1428) en Jan 'Zonder Genade' van Beieren (1418–1425)", In: Graven van Holland, Middeleeuwse Vorsten in Woord en Beeld (880-1580), 2010, p...
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911) Encyclopædia Britannica(11th ed.) Cambridge University Press
  8. Joan of Valois, Countess of Hainaut — Wikipedia Republished ...

    wiki2.org › en › Joan_of_Valois,_Countess_of_Hainaut
    • Lineage
    • Countess of Hainaut
    • Mediator
    • Issue

    Her pa­ter­nal grand­par­ents were Philip III of France and Is­abella of Aragon. Her ma­ter­nal grand­par­ents were Charles II of Naples and Maria Arpad of Hun­gary. Joan was one of six chil­dren. In 1299, Joan's mother died, prob­a­bly in child­birth, and her fa­ther mar­ried his sec­ond wife, Cather­ine I of Courte­nay, Tit­u­lar Em­press of Con­stan­tino­ple, by whom he had four more chil­dren. He would marry his third wife, Ma­haut of Châtillon, in 1308, and by her he would sire a son and three daugh­ters, among them Is­abella of Val­ois, who be­came Duchess of Bour­bon, and Blanche of Val­ois, who mar­ried Charles IV, Holy Roman Em­peror.

    Joan mar­ried William I, on 23 May 1305. She was a sup­porter of her cousin Is­abella of France in her strug­gle against Ed­ward II. In De­cem­ber 1325, she trav­eled to France to at­tend the fu­neral of her fa­ther and had talks with Is­abella and Charles IV of France. This brought about an al­liance be­tween Hain­aut, Is­abella, and the Eng­lish ex­iles, who were in op­po­si­tion to the Eng­lish king and his fa­vorite, Hugh De­spenser the Younger. Is­abella's son be­came en­gaged to Joan's daugh­ter Philippa and Is­abella raised an army in their lands. It was also from there that Is­abella and her lover, Roger Mor­timer, began their in­va­sion of Eng­land. In 1332, after Philippa had be­come queen, she arranged a wed­ding be­tween Is­abella's daugh­ter Eleanor of Wood­stock and Regi­nald II, Duke of Guelders, and she vis­ited her daugh­ter Philippa in Eng­land.

    After her hus­band died in 1337, Joan took the veil and en­tered into Fontenelle Abbey. In 1340, her son-in-law dealt her brother Philip a heavy blow by de­feat­ing him at sea near Sluys. Ed­ward then went on to be­siege Tour­nai, but was beset by fi­nan­cial prob­lems. Pope Bene­dict XIIthen asked Joan to me­di­ate. She first went to her brother, whom she had begged for peace. Then she went to Ed­ward in his tent and begged him for peace as well. The pleas of their rel­a­tive Joan, sent by the pope, al­lowed the two men to sign a truce with­out loss of face.

    Joan's chil­dren with William I 1. William II, Count of Hainaut(1307–1345) 2. John (died 1316) 3. Empress Margaret (1311–1356), married Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor 4. Queen Philippa (24 June 1314 – 1369), married king Edward III of England 5. Agnes (died 1327) 6. Johanna von Jülich (1315–1374), married William V, Duke of Jülich 7. Isabella of Hainaut (1323–1361), married Robert of Namur 8. Louis (1325–1328)

  9. Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut - Interesting stories about ...

    fampeople.com › cat-jacqueline-countess-of-hainaut_2

    May 18, 2019 · Jacqueline, Countess of Hainaut : biography 16 August 1401 – 8 October 1436 Jacqueline hoped that Humphrey would restore her to her counties but, being regent in England, he was occupied with affairs of state.

  10. Béatrix de Hainaut (deceased) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com › people › Béatrix-de-Hainaut

    May 18, 2019 · Beatrix of Hainault. Born: 992 in Hainault, France, Died: AFT 1035. Father: Regnier IV Count of Hainault b: ABT 950 in Hainault, Belgium. Mother: Hedwig (Edith) Princess of France b: ABT 965 in France. Marriage 1 Ebles I Comte de Rheims & Roucy b: 988 in Roucy, Aisne, Picardy, France.

  11. Baldwin V, Count of Hainaut - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Baldwin_V,_Count_of_Hainaut

    Baldwin V of Hainaut (1150 – 17 December 1195) was count of Hainaut (1171–1195), margrave of Namur as Baldwin I (1189–1195) and count of Flanders as Baldwin VIII (1191–1195).

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