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  1. Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of Ivan III) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitry_Ivanovich_(grandson...

    Dmitry Ivanovich Vnuk (the Grandson) (Russian: Дмитрий Иванович Внук) (1483–1509) was Grand Prince of Moscow between 1498 and 1502. Dmitry's parents were Ivan the Young, crown heir of Moscow, and Elena of Moldavia, daughter of Stephen III of Moldavia.

  2. Ivan III of Russia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_III_of_Russia

    Ivan's son with Maria of Tver, Ivan the Young, died in 1490, leaving from his marriage with Helen of Moldavia an only child, Dmitry the Grandson. The latter was crowned as successor by his grandfather on 15 February 1498, [14] but later Ivan reverted his decision in favor of Sophia's elder son Vasily , who was ultimately crowned co-regent with ...

  3. Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of Ivan III) - WikiMili, The Free ...

    wikimili.com/en/Dmitry_Ivanovich_(grandson_of...

    Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of Ivan III) Last updated March 25, 2019. Dmitry Ivanovich Vnuk (the Grandson) (Russian: Дмитрий Иванович Внук) (1483–1509) was Grand Prince of Moscow between 1498 and 1502.

  4. Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of Ivan III) : definition of ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of...

    Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of Ivan III) Dmitry Ivanovich (1483–1509) was Grand Prince of Moscow between 1498 and 1502. Dmitry's parents were Ivan the Young , crown heir of Moscow , and Elena, daughter of Stephen III of Moldavia .

  5. Dmitry Ivanovich, the Grand Prince. Rise and Fall | The ...

    www.analeleputnei.ro/articole/marele-cneaz...

    After his death, Ivan III Vasilyevich had to choose a heir between his grandson, Dmitry Ivanovich, and his son from his second marriage with Sophia Paleologue, Vasili Ivanovich. On February 4, 1498, Ivan III had his grandson, Dmitry, crowned Grand Prince of Vladimir, Moscow and all Russia.

  6. Grand Duchy of Moscow Ivan III "the Great" Vasilievich ...

    www.geni.com/people/Grand-Duchy-of-Moscow-Ivan...

    Ivan's son with Maria of Tver, Ivan the Young, died in 1490, leaving from marriage with Helen of Wallachia an only child, Dmitry the Grandson. The latter was crowned as successor by his grandfather in 1497, but later Ivan reverted his decision in favour of Sophia's elder son Vasily who was ultimately crowned co-regent with his father (April 14 ...

  7. Ivan the Young - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org/Ivan_the_Young

    25 relations: Ahmed Khan bin Küchük, Ambassador, Borovsk, Chronicle, Dmitry Ivanovich (grandson of Ivan III), Elena of Moldavia, Gout, Grand Duchy of Moscow, Grand prince, Great stand on the Ugra river, Ibrahim of Kazan, Ivan III of Russia, Maria of Tver, Moscow, Oka River, Regiment, Rulers of Russia family tree, Russian language, Russians, Russo-Kazan Wars, Stephen III of Moldavia, Tatars ...

  8. Dmitry of Uglich - .. passion bearers .. Info | About | What ...

    google-wiki.info/1172619/1/dmitry-of-uglich.html

    Dmitry, the youngest son of Ivan the terrible and Evans the only child born of Mary Naked. After the death of Ivan IV, Dmitrys older brother, Feodor I, came to power. However, the actual ruler of the Russian state was Federali brother-in-law, boyar Boris Godunov, who had a claim to the Russian throne.

  9. Ivan iv av ryssland dmitry of uglich | ivan ivanovitj av ...

    alltsaklara.xyz/2016/05/uglich-goritsi-and-kirillo...

    Ivan iv av ryssland dmitry of uglich Dmitry of Uglich - Wikipedi . Life. Dmitry was the youngest son of Ivan the Terrible and Ivan's only child born to Maria Nagaya.After the death of Ivan IV, Dmitry's older brother, Feodor I, ascended to power.However, the actual ruler of the Russian state was Feodor's brother-in-law, a boyar, Boris Godunov, who had had a claim on the Russian throne.According ...

  10. 16th Century | Rusmania

    rusmania.com/history-of-russia/16th-century
    • The Last Years of Ivan The Great
    • Reign of Vasily III
    • The Long-Awaited Heir
    • Regency of Yelena Glinskaya
    • Coronation of Tsar Ivan The Terrible
    • Reforms
    • Origins of The Cossacks
    • Conquest of The Kazan and Astrakhan Khanates
    • Outbreak of The Livonian War
    • The Oprichnina

    'Moscow Kremlin during the Reign of Ivan III' by Apollinary Vasnetsov In 1500 rumours reached Ivan III that his daughter Yelena - the wife of Grand Duke Aleksandras of Lithuania - was being mistreated and forced into renouncing her Orthodox faith in violation of the marriage treaty. Using this as a pretext, war broke out between Moscow and Lithuania which ended with a peace treaty where one-third of Lithuanian territory, including the old Kievan-Rus city of Chernigov, was ceded to Moscow, although Ivan III's aim of recapturing Smolensk was not achieved. In the last years of Ivan III's reign a struggle to be named heir broke out between his grandson Dmitry Ivanovich (the son of Ivan III's oldest son Ivan Ivanovich who died in 1490) and Ivan III's oldest surviving son Vasily Ivanovich. In 1498 it seems that Dmitry Ivanovich had taken the advantage upon being named co-ruler, however he allowed himself to get involved in various conspiracies which led to his eventual arrest and imprison...

    Vasily III continued the policies of his father in gathering Rus lands. In 1510 he marched on the Pskov Republic and declared the dissolution of the Pskov veche and the annexation of the republic into Moscow. In 1513 Prince Fyodor Borisovich of Volokolamsk died and Vasily III in turn annexed his cousin's territory. In 1513 Vasily III led Muscovite troops in besieging Smolensk which had been lost to Lithuania in 1404. The city was eventually recaptured on a third attempt in 1514. In 1520 Vasily III invited Grand Prince Ivan Ivanovich of Ryazan to Moscow where he had him arrested due to the relation Ryazan had with the khan of Crimea. When Ivan Ivanovich escaped from prison to Lithuania in 1521 Vasily III used it as a pretext to annex his principality.

    'Vasily III leads his bride Yelena Glinskaya into the Palace' by Klavdy Lebedev Vasily proved to be a rather successful grand prince in terms of widening Moscow's influence and borders but in one sphere he proved less successful - after 20 years of marriage he still had no heir. Despite protests from the Church, in 1526 Vasily decided to divorce his wife Solomonia Saburova by exiling her to a convent in Suzdal and to remarry. Yelena Glinskaya became his new wife and she gave Vasily his long-awaited heir in 1530 plus a spare in 1532. In Russian folklore the Salomnia cursed Vasily and his new wife. In any case, Vasily's heir would grow up to be the infamous Ivan the Terrible. Vasily died shortly after the birth of his sons in 1533.

    When Ivan the Terrible was just a child his mother, Yelena Glinskaya, reigned as regent. Glinskaya was fully aware of the delicate position she and her infant children were in. She considered her major threat to be her brothers-in-law who could easily become involved in a plot by boyars in a play for power. In 1534 she had Prince Yuri Ivanovich of Dmitrov arrested and seized his land in the name of her son. Yuri Ivanovich died in prison in 1536. In 1537 rumours reached Yelena that the next eldest brother Prince Andrey Ivanovich of Staritsa was attempting to flee to Lithuania. Yelena had him arrested and he too ended his days in prison - his territory passing to his baby son Vladimir who was bought to Moscow. Even seeing off two potential threats was not enough though, as Yelena herself was dead by 1538, most likely poisoned by a boyar - the main suspects being the Shuisky family.

    'Ivan the Terrible' by Viktor Vasnetsov The orphaned Ivan and his deaf-mute brother Yury were left to the mercy of the boyars who probably had a role in the death of their mother. Ivan later complained how he and his brother were neglected by the boyars who were too busy fighting among themselves to secure influence to actually play a useful role in concerning themselves with the health and upbringing of the young grand prince. This resulted in Ivan developing a deep hatred for the boyars in later years. In 1547 Ivan finally reached maturity and no longer needed a regent. In a clear show of him now taking up the reins he planned his coronation where he was named not just grand prince of Moscow but tsar of Russia - the first to be officially crowned as such. The word tsar is a corruption of the name Caesar and was traditional used by the Russians to refer to the Byzantine emperor or the khan of the Golden Horde. At his coronation Ivan declared that he was now the sole and supreme lea...

    'The Streltsy' by Sergei Ivanov The first year of Ivan's reign was met with disaster in the form of the Great Fire of Moscow in the summer of 1547. At this time most of the city was built out of wood and one-third of the city went up in flames, claiming the lives of thousands of people and setting off a rebellion which saw the Glinsky family fall from grace. Once this difficult period was over Ivan was able to put his authority to good effect and began a series of reforms. He introduced a new code of laws which in part put greater restrictions on the movement of peasants, established a standing army known as the Streltsy and a form of parliament known as the Zemsky Sobor. In 1551 Muscovy Company was founded in England which saw trade flourish between Russia and England via Arkhangelsk and the White Sea and in 1553 the first printing press was opened in Moscow.

    'Zaporozhian Cossack on lookout' by Serhii Vasylkivsky For centuries Slavic people had been settling in the steppe area around the lower reaches of the River Don, Dnieper and Ural and assimilating with other steppe people such as the Khazars, Pechenegs, Polovsty and Tatars. By the 15th century these people had become known as Cossacks and were living in communities independent from their neighbours of Poland-Lithuania, Moscow and the Crimean Khanate. By the 16th century independent territorial organisations, known as hosts, had come into existence. The major hosts included those of the Zaporozhian Cossacks (located around the Dnieper in what is now Ukraine), the Don Cossacks (around the River Don) and the Yaik/Ural Cossacks (around the River Yaik which was later renamed the River Ural). Several other smaller hosts would also later be formed. The Cossacks organised themselves on military lines and were excellent horsemen, making them in demand by neighbouring Poland-Lithuania and Rus...

    'The Siege of Kazan' by V Bodrov Ivan's administrative reforms on the whole proved successful but Ivan's rule reached its peak in 1552 when he succeeded where his father and grandfather failed - conquering the Kazan Khanate after decades of war between Moscow and Kazan. This success led to the neighbouring Bashkirs accepting Ivan's authority in 1554 and the annexation of the Astrakhan Khanate by Russian in 1556. The end of the Tatar-Mongol Yoke officially ended during the reign of Ivan's grandfather Ivan the Great, but it was really Ivan the Terrible who saw this arrangement put into practice by absorbing much of the remnants of the Golden Horde into the now multi-ethnic and multi-faith Tsardom of Russia - only the Crimean Khanate remained as a major threat. In celebration of the conquest of Kazan, Ivan ordered the building of St Basil's Cathedral on Moscow's Red Square - allegedly inspired by the main mosque which once stood in Kazan.

    'Siege of a Livonian City by Ivan IV' by Fyodor Modrov After the successes over the Tatars, Ivan turned his attention to gaining access to the sea by taking advantage of the weakened position of the Livonian Confederation (modern-day Latvia and Estonia). In 1558 Ivan ordered the invasion of Livonia on the pretext of Livonia entering into an alliance with Poland-Lithuania in violation of an earlier treaty between Livonia and Russia. The Russians quickly made gains by capturing Dorpat and Narva and besieging Revel. In 1561 the Livonian Confederation was disbanded and the former territory passed to Lithuania. This led to war between Russia and Lithuania. Eventually Sweden and Denmark also entered the bloody struggle for Livonia which would last decades and become a massive drain on Russia.

    After the Conquest of Kazan it might have seen as if the first tsar was on a course to match and even exceed the successes of his grandfather Ivan the Great, but instead in the 1560s Ivan the Terrible earned his famous English sobriquet of Terrible (in Russian he is known as 'Ivan Grozny' which can be translated as 'formidable' or 'awesome'). In 1560 Ivan's wife Anastasia Romanovna Zakharina-Yurieva died and it was another case of suspected poisoning. This was followed in 1564 by Prince Andrey Kurbsky - one of Ivan's most trusted friends - defecting to the Lithuanians. All this seems to have had a drastic effect on Ivan's mental health, which since his traumatic childhood was always fragile. Ivan's suspicion and hatred of the nobility boiled over and in December 1564 he went to Aleksandrova Sloboda and announced his abdication due to the corruption and treason of the boyars. The boyars in turned feared for their safety and positions at the hands of the citizens and begged Ivan to re...