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  1. Dome of the Rock - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Dome_of_the_Rock

    The Dome of the Rock was the focus of extensive royal patronage by the sultans during the Mamluk period, which lasted from 1260 until 1516. Ottoman period (1517–1917) During the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent (1520–1566), the exterior of the Dome of the Rock was covered with tiles. This work took seven years.

    • Ministry of Awqaf (Jordan)
    • Islam
  2. Dome of the Rock | History, Architecture, & Significance ...

    www.britannica.com › topic › Dome-of-the-Rock

    May 11, 2021 · Dome of the Rock, shrine in Jerusalem built in the late 7th century CE that is the oldest extant Islamic monument in the world, believed to be the site of Muhammad’s ascent to heaven (the Mi‘raj). Its structure and ornamentation are rooted in the Byzantine architectural tradition.

  3. DOME OF THE ROCK (Jerusalem) - Who Built It, When & Why?

    israeljerusalem.com › dome-of-the-rock

    Dome of the Rock, whose golden dome has become the iconic symbol of Jerusalem, is an Islamic shrine on the Temple Mount of Jerusalem's old city. For 1,300 years, the Dome of the Rock served as a flag of victory for whoever conquered this city.

  4. Dome of the Rock - New World Encyclopedia

    www.newworldencyclopedia.org › entry › Dome_of_the_Rock
    • Location, Construction, and Dimensions
    • History
    • Accessibility
    • References
    • External Links

    The Dome of the Rock is located at the visual center of an ancient human-made platform known to the Jews as the Temple Mount or to the Muslims as the Haram al-Sharif ("Noble Sanctuary"). The platform, greatly enlarged under the rule of Herod the Great, was the former site of the Second Jewish Temple that was destroyed during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 C.E. In 637 C.E., Jerusalem was conquered by the Rashidun Caliphate army during the Islamic invasion of the Byzantine Empire. After signing a peace treaty Caliph Umarasked the Patriach to lead him to the place of the old Jewish Temple. Umar was shocked to find the site covered in rubbish, as the Romans had initiated the custom of using it as a dung heap. Umar knelt down immediately, and began to clear the area with his hands. When the Muslims saw what he was doing, they followed his example, and soon the entire area of approximately 35 acres, was cleaned up. He commissioned the construction of a wooden mosque on the southern en...

    Crusaders

    During the Crusades, the Dome of the Rock was given to the Augustinians, who turned it into a church, and the Al-Aqsa Mosque became the royal palace of Baldwin I of Jerusalem in 1104. The Knights Templar, who believed the Dome of the Rock was the site of the Temple of Solomon, set up their headquarters in the Al-Aqsa Mosque adjacent to the Dome for much of the twelfth century. The "Templum Domini," as they called it, was featured on the official seals of the Order's Grand Masters (such as Evr...

    Ayyubids and Mamluks

    Jerusalem was recaptured by Saladinon Friday, October 2, 1187, and the Haram was reconsecrated as a Muslim sanctuary. The cross on top of the Dome of the Rock was replaced by a golden crescent and a wooden screen was placed around the rock below. Salah al-Din's nephew al-Malik al-Mu'azzam Isa (615-24/1218-27) carried out other restorations within the Haram and added the porch to the Aqsa mosque. The Haram was the focus of extensive royal patronage by the sultans during the Mamlukperiod, which...

    Ottoman Empire 1517-1917

    Large-scale renovation was undertaken during the reign of Mahmud II in 1817.

    The dome is formally owned and maintained by the Ministry of Awqaf in Jordan. Until the mid-nineteenth century, non-Muslims were barred from the area. Since 1967, non-Muslims have been allowed some entry, but non-Muslim prayers on the Temple Mount are not allowed. After Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon visited the Temple Mount in 2000, in what was considered by some a provocative gesture that set off Muslim rioting, non-Muslims were forbidden to enter the Temple compound. In 2006, the compound was reopened to non-Muslim visitors free of charge. Non-muslims may never enter on Fridays, Saturdays, or Muslim holidays. Entry is through a covered wooden walkway next to the security entrance to the Western Wall known as the Mugrabi or Maimonides Gate. Entry to the mosques themselves is prohibited to non-Muslims, as is access to the Temple Mount through the Cotton Market. Visitors undergo strict security screening, and items such as Hebrew prayerbooks or musical instruments are not allow...

    Graber, Oleg. The Dome of the Rock. Belknap Press, 2006. ISBN 978-0674023130
    Graber, Oleg. The Shape of the Holy: Early Islamic Jerusalem. Princeton University Press, 1996. ISBN 978-0691036533
    Nuseibeh, Said. The Dome of the Rock. Thames & Hudson, 1996. ISBN 978-0500341483
    Peterson, Andrew. Dictionary of Islamic Architecture. London: Routledge, 1994. ISBN 0415060842

    All links retrieved October 16, 2017. 1. Dome of the RockSacred Destinations 2. Dome of the RockBible places. 3. Dome of the RockInterior picture. 4. Dome of the RockSacred sites. 5. Dome of the Rockfrom Jerusalem photos portal. 6. Photo Gallery of the Temple Mount and the Dome of the Rock

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  6. What is the Dome of the Rock? | GotQuestions.org

    www.gotquestions.org › Dome-of-the-Rock

    Apr 26, 2021 · The Dome of the Rock is a Muslim shrine that was built on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem in AD 691. The Dome of the Rock is part of a larger Muslim holy area that takes up a significant portion of what is also known as Mount Moriah in the heart of Jerusalem.

  7. The Dome of the Rock (Qubbat al-Sakhra) (article) | Khan Academy

    www.khanacademy.org › humanities › ap-art-history

    The Dome of the Rock (Qubbat al-Sakhra), Umayyad, stone masonry, wooden roof, decorated with glazed ceramic tile, mosaics, and gilt aluminum and bronze dome, 691-2, with multiple renovations, patron the Caliph Abd al-Malik, Jerusalem (photo: Orientalist, CC BY 3.0) The Dome of the Rock is a building of extraordinary beauty, solidity, elegance ...

  8. Dome of the Rock: Religious Significance, History, and ...

    brewminate.com › dome-of-the-rock-religious
    • Introduction
    • Religious Significance
    • Location, Construction, and Dimensions
    • Architecture
    • History
    • Accessibility
    • Appendix

    The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit.: Masjid Qubbat As-Sakhrah, Hebrew: כיפת הסלע, translit.: Kipat Hasela) is an Islamic shrine and a major landmark in Jerusalem. It was completed in 691 C.E., making it the oldest extant Islamic building in the world. The Dome of the Rock has a striking presence in the holy city of Jerusalem. It is located on the Temple Mount, a spot is sacred to Jews, Christians and Muslims. In this way the Dome of the Rock provides a visual reminder and tangible symbol of not only the underlying unity among the Abrahamic religions but also their discord and rivalry.

    The Dome of the Rock, being among a complex of buildings on the Temple Mount, (the other being the Al-Aqsa Mosque) is one of the holiest sites in Judaism, Islam and Christianity. Its significance stems from the religious beliefs regarding the rock at its heart. The rock is the peak of Mount Moriah which has always been regarded as sacred. In an ancient Semitic tradition the bare rock at the top was thought to be the mouth of the serpent Tahum and the intersection of the underworld and upper world. It is also called the Foundation Stone. According to the sages of the Talmud it was from this rock that the world was created, itself being the first part of the Earth to come into existence. In the words of the Zohar: “The world was not created until God took a stone called Even haShetiyaand threw it into the depths where it was fixed from above till below, and from it the world expanded. It is the center point of the world and on this spot stood the Holy of Holies.” According to the Talm...

    The Dome of the Rock is located at the visual center of an ancient human-made platform known to the Jews as the Temple Mount or to the Muslims as the Haram al-Sharif (“Noble Sanctuary”). The platform, greatly enlarged under the rule of Herod the Great, was the former site of the Second Jewish Temple that was destroyed during the Roman Siege of Jerusalem in 70 C.E. In 637 C.E., Jerusalem was conquered by the Rashidun Caliphate army during the Islamic invasion of the Byzantine Empire. After signing a peace treaty Caliph Umar asked the Patriach to lead him to the place of the old Jewish Temple. Umar was shocked to find the site covered in rubbish, as the Romans had initiated the custom of using it as a dung heap. Umar knelt down immediately, and began to clear the area with his hands. When the Muslims saw what he was doing, they followed his example, and soon the entire area of approximately 35 acres, was cleaned up. He commissioned the construction of a wooden mosque on the southern e...

    Exterior The Dome is in the shape of a Byzantine martyrium, a structure intended for the housing and veneration of saintly relics, and is an excellent example of middle Byzantine art. al-Maqdisi reports that surplus funds consisting of 100,000 gold dinar coins were melted down and cast on the dome’s exterior, “which at the time had a strong glitter that no eye could look straight at it.”During the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent the exterior of the Dome of the Rock was covered with Iznik tiles. The work took seven years. Haj Amin Al-Husseini, appointed Grand Mufti by the British during the Mandate, along with Yacoub Al Ghussein implemented restoration of Dome of the Rock and Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem. In 1955, an extensive program of renovation was begun by the government of Jordan, with funds supplied by the Arab governments and Turkey. The work included replacement of large numbers of tiles dating back to the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent, which had become dislodged by hea...

    Crusaders During the Crusades, the Dome of the Rock was given to the Augustinians, who turned it into a church, and the Al-Aqsa Mosque became the royal palace of Baldwin I of Jerusalem in 1104. The Knights Templar, who believed the Dome of the Rock was the site of the Temple of Solomon, set up their headquarters in the Al-Aqsa Mosque adjacent to the Dome for much of the twelfth century. The “Templum Domini,” as they called it, was featured on the official seals of the Order’s Grand Masters (such as Evrard de Barres and Regnaud de Vichier), and it became the architectural model for Templar churches across Europe. Ayyubids and Mamluks Jerusalem was recaptured by Saladin on Friday, October 2, 1187, and the Haram was reconsecrated as a Muslim sanctuary. The cross on top of the Dome of the Rock was replaced by a golden crescent and a wooden screen was placed around the rock below. Salah al-Din’s nephew al-Malik al-Mu’azzam Isa (615-24/1218-27) carried out other restorations within the Ha...

    The dome is formally owned and maintained by the Ministry of Awqaf in Jordan. Until the mid-nineteenth century, non-Muslims were barred from the area. Since 1967, non-Muslims have been allowed some entry, but non-Muslim prayers on the Temple Mount are not allowed. After Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon visited the Temple Mount in 2000, in what was considered by some a provocative gesture that set off Muslim rioting, non-Muslims were forbidden to enter the Temple compound. In 2006, the compound was reopened to non-Muslim visitors free of charge. Non-muslims may never enter on Fridays, Saturdays, or Muslim holidays. Entry is through a covered wooden walkway next to the security entrance to the Western Wall known as the Mugrabi or Maimonides Gate. Entry to the mosques themselves is prohibited to non-Muslims, as is access to the Temple Mount through the Cotton Market. Visitors undergo strict security screening, and items such as Hebrew prayerbooks or musical instruments are not allow...

    Notes 1. Rizwi Faizer, The Shape of the Holy: Early Islamic Jerusalem,Rizwi’s Bibliography for Medieval Islam. Retrieved May 27, 2008. 2. Tractate Yoma 54b. 3. ↑Vayechi 1:231. 4. 1 Chronicles 21:25, and 2 Samuel 24:18-25. 5. Wilkinson, Jerusalem Pilgrims Before the Crusades,p. 204. 6. Victoria and Albert Museum, Drawings of Islamic Buildings: Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem.Retrieved May 27, 2008. 7. Abu-Bakr al-Wasiti, Fada’il Bayt al-Maqdis, p. 80-81. 8. Encyclopedia Britannica, Dome of the Rock.Retrieved May 27, 2008. 9. Shams al-Din al-Maqdisi, Ahsan al-Taqasim fi Mar’rifat al-Aqalim, 2nd ed. (Leiden, 1967) pp. 159-171. 10. Shlomo Dov Goitein, “The Historication Background of the Erection of the Dome of the Rock,” Journal of American Oriental Society,Vol. 70, No. 2, 1950. 11. Glass, Steel, and Stone, Dome of the Rock.Retrieved May 27, 2008. 12. Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad. 13. Abu-Bakr al-Wasiti, Fada’il Bayt al-Maqdis,p. 80-81. 14. www.hzzretz.co.il, Photo of Shlomo Goren insi...

  9. Jan 09, 2014 · Muslims recapture the Dome of the Rock – then lose it to Israel. The Crusaders re-captured Jerusalem in 1099 and turned the Dome of the Rock into a church (it was at this time that the Knights Templar, who rightly believed the Dome of the Rock was the site of Solomon’s Temple, set up headquarters in a captured Mosque adjacent to the Dome ...

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