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  1. Elisabeth of the Palatinate (26 December 1618 – 11 February 1680), also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate, or Princess-Abbess of Herford Abbey, was the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (who was briefly King of Bohemia), and Elizabeth Stuart.

    Elisabeth of the Palatinate - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_of_the_Palatinate
  2. Elisabeth of the Palatinate - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_of_the_Palatinate

    Elisabeth of the Palatinate (26 December 1618 – 11 February 1680), also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate, or Princess-Abbess of Herford Abbey, was the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (who was briefly King of Bohemia), and Elizabeth Stuart.

  3. Elizabeth Charlotte, Madame Palatine - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Charlotte...

    Elisabeth Charlotte was born on 27 May 1652 in the castle of Heidelberg as the second child and only daughter of Charles I Louis, Elector Palatine, and his wife Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel. Named after her paternal grandmother Elizabeth Stuart and her own mother, from a young age she was nicknamed Liselotte, a portmanteau of both her names.

  4. Elisabeth of the Palatinate, Landgravine of Hesse - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_of_the_Palatinate...

    The Palatinate party then proposed that Elisabeth should marry William II. William declined, and married a princess close to the House of Habsburg . William II also participated in the imperial ban against Elisabeth's father and brother, because of the dispute over Elisabeth's wittum.

  5. Elisabeth of the Palatinate – She Thought It

    shethoughtit.ilcml.com/biography/elisabeth-of...

    Elisabeth of the Palatinate (Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate, Princess-Abbess of Herford Abbey) was born in 1618 in Heidelberg as the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine of the Rhine, and his wife Elizabeth Stuart.

  6. Elisabeth of the Palatinate | Eric Flint Wiki | Fandom

    ericflint.fandom.com/.../Elisabeth_of_the_Palatinate

    Elisabeth of the Palatinate Elisabeth of the Palatinate (26 December 1618 – 11 February 1680), also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia, was the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine, who was briefly King of Bohemia, and Elizabeth Stuart.

  7. Elisabeth of the Palatinate and Her Influence on Descartes ...

    www.placefortruth.org/blog/elisabeth-of-the...
    • Elisabeth of The Palatinate and Her Influence on Descartes
    • Religion and Education
    • Mind and Body
    • The Emotions
    • Retirement

    Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate (also known as Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia) is remembered as the woman who challenged the French philosopher René Descartes to re-examine his assertions on the separation of mind and body. While she never received a satisfying answer to all of her questions, she inspired him to reconsider some of his positions and to revise his view on human passions. She was born on December 26, 1618 in Heidelberg, in today’s Germany. It was the first year of the devastating Thirty Years War, and her life was marked with troubles from the start. Her parents, Frederick V, Elector Palatine, and Elisabeth Stuart, daughter of James I of England, were at that time struggling as rulers of Bohemia. In 1620, they were forced to exile to the Netherlands, leaving Elisabeth and her older brothers, Henry Frederick and Charles, with their paternal grandmother, Louise Juliana of Nassau (daughter of the legendary William of Orange). By this time, Louise had found refuge with...

    All the children in the household received a thorough education, both religious and secular. They rose at dawn to pray, read the Bible, and memorize the Heidelberg Catechism, then spent the rest of the day learning a great variety of school subjects. Young Elisabeth was exceptional in her passion for learning. Her sisters nicknamed her “La Grecque” because of her love for ancient Greek. According to an early 20th-century writer, her mother’s comments were even sharper, “Look, I pray you, my lord,” she quipped to Lord William Craven, “at Elizabeth settling the world by a theory! Alack! but her deep thoughts have made her nose red, and yet they cannot assuage her sorrow at this unwelcome colouring!” We don’t know if the last comment is accurate (the author defined her book “a romance”), but the problem of Elisabeth’s nose is attested by her sister Charlotte, who said it was “rather apt to turn red,”causing the princess to stay in her room until the color had subsided. Religion continu...

    She met Descartes during one of his visits to The Hague. They discussed mathematics and philosophy. She surprised him by providing an answer to an intriguing geometrical problem, and expressed her interest in his metaphysical theories. As she examined these more thoroughly in the context of her daily life, however, she began to question his sharp dualism between mind and body. For Descartes, this dualism was a logical consequence of his Cogito ergo sumargument. We can doubt everything, he thought, except the fact that we are thinking. We can doubt the existence of our body (physical senses could be an illusion) but not the existence of a thinking mind. Therefore, the thinking mind is not the same as the body. If, at this point, your thinking mind is raising a swarm of objections, you are not alone. Descartes’s theory received much criticism. In some ways, it was a recent issue. Previous discussions focused on body and soul rather than the mind. Elisabeth was one of the first to expr...

    In spite of philosophical disagreements, Elisabeth and Descartes remained good friends, and he was often concerned for her health. Once, when she was plagued by a persisting low-grade fever, he suggested melancholy as a possible cause. As a remedy, he recommended reading Seneca’s De Vita Beata, a stoic classic on mastering emotions. Elisabeth was not impressed by what she read. First of all, she didn’t think contentment depended entirely on willpower. Besides, while it’s true that the mind can restrain emotions, some bodily ailments can impair the mind. Finally, the fact that an emotion disturbs one’s serenity doesn’t make it antithetical to virtue. For example, regret, as upsetting as it is, is good and useful, because it moves to repentance. She encouraged Descartes to write more about this subject to remedy the deficiencies in Seneca’s writings.

    In 1660, at 42 years of age, Elisabeth entered the Lutheran convent at Herford (even if she maintained her Reformed convictions). Seven years later, she became its abbess, presiding over the surrounding community. By this time, the Thirty Years War had ended, leaving in its wake an unprecedented devastation. As a reaction, many people, including Elisabeth, became advocates for religious toleration. Her convent became a refuge from religious persecution, even for sects such as the Labadists and Quakers. She died on February 12, 1680 after a long and painful illness (most likely a form of internal cancer). Today, she is mostly remembered as the woman who caused Descartes to question his theories.

  8. Elisabeth of the Palatinate and the Mind-Body Problem ...

    modernreformation.org/resource-library/web...

    In 1643, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate asked the philosopher René Descartes for some explanations about his theories on the distinction about the body and the mind – the same mind he had made the starting point for the confirmation of all knowledge in his Cogito ergo sum argument (“I think, therefore I am”).

  9. Elisabeth Of The Palatinate - Net Worth, Age, Bio, Height ...

    networthfolk.com/elisabeth-of-the-palatinate

    Jan 12, 2021 · Discover Elisabeth of the Palatinate biography, age, height, net worth, birthday, family, facts! Elisabeth of the Palatinate famous was born on December 26, 1618 in Germany.

  10. Elisabeth of the Palatinate and Her Influence on Descartes ...

    www.theaquilareport.com/elisabeth-of-the...

    Mar 30, 2019 · Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate (also known as Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia) is remembered as the woman who challenged the French philosopher René Descartes to re-examine his assertions on the separation of mind and body.

  11. Elisabeth of the Palatinate also known as Elisabeth of ...

    www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/elisabeth...

    Elisabeth of the Palatinate also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia and Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate (1618-1680). Eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (1596-1632), who was briefly King of Bohemia, and Elizabeth Stuart (1596-13 February 1662). After a painting by Gerrit van Honthorst (1590-1656).

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