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  1. Elizabeth of York (11 February 1466 – 11 February 1503) was Queen of England from her marriage to King Henry VII on 18 January 1486 until her death in 1503. Elizabeth married Henry after his victory at the Battle of Bosworth Field, which marked the end of the Wars of the Roses. They had seven children together.

    • Early Life
    • Death of Edward IV
    • Henry Tudor
    • Children
    • Death and Legacy
    • Fictional Representations
    • Sources

    Elizabeth of York, known alternatively as Elizabeth Plantagenet, was born on February 11, 1466, at Westminster Palace in London, England. She was the eldest of the nine children of Edward IV, king of England (ruled 1461–1483) and his wife Elizabeth Woodville(sometimes spelled Wydeville). Her parents' marriage had created trouble, and her father was...

    In 1483, with the sudden death of her father Edward IV, Elizabeth of York was at the center of the storm, as the eldest child of King Edward IV. Her younger brother was declared Edward V, but because he was 13, his father's brother Richard Plantagenet was named regent protector. Before Edward V could be crowned, Richard imprisoned him and his young...

    Richard III was killed on the battlefield in 1485, and Henry Tudor (Henry VII) succeeded him, declared himself King of England by right of conquest. He delayed some months in marrying the Yorkist heiress, Elizabeth of York, until after his own coronation. They were married in January 1486, gave birth to their first child, Arthur, in September, and ...

    Elizabeth of York apparently lived peacefully in her marriage. She and Henry had seven children, four surviving to adulthood—a fairly decent percentage for the time. Three of the four became kings or queens in their own right: Margaret Tudor (November 28, 1489–October 18, 1541) who married King James IV of Scotland); Henry VIII, King of England (Ju...

    It's been surmised that Elizabeth became pregnant again to try to have another male heir for the throne after Arthur's death, in case the surviving son, Henry died. Bearing heirs was, after all, one of the most crucial responsibilities of a queen consort, especially to the hopeful founder of a new dynasty, the Tudors. If so, it was a mistake. Eliza...

    Elizabeth of York is a character in Shakespeare's Richard III. She has little to say there; she is merely a pawn to be married to either Richard III or Henry VII. Because she is the last Yorkist heir (assuming her brothers, the Princes in the Tower, have been killed), her children's claim to the crown of England will be more secure. Elizabeth of Yo...

    License, Amy. "Elizabeth of York: The Forgotten Tudor Queen." Gloucestershire, Amberley Publishing, 2013.
    Naylor Okerlund, Arlene. "Elizabeth of York." New York: St. Martin's Press, 2009.
    Weir, Alison. "Elizabeth of York: A Tudor Queen and Her World." New York: Ballantine Books, 2013.
    • Jone Johnson Lewis
    • 2 min
    • Women's History Writer
  2. Jul 01, 2012 · Elizabeth of York was the daughter of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville. Born into one of the houses caught in the struggle that would later so eloquently be called 'The Wars of the Roses', one would think that she had a difficult childhood. In fact, she was living a pleasantly secure life until the death of her father in 1483.

  3. Jun 22, 2022 · Elizabeth of York, born in 1466, was the eldest daughter of King Edward IV and Queen Elizabeth. She was a devoted wife and mother, a beautiful and charming Queen, and accomplished many things in her short life. Elizabeth of York was betrothed multiple times

  4. Apr 08, 2022 · Elizabeth of York was the eldest daughter of the Yorkist king Edward IV, sister of the princes in the Tower, and niece of Richard III. Her marriage to Henry VII was hugely popular, for the union of the white rose of York and the red rose of Lancaster was seen as bringing peace after years of dynastic war.

  5. Elizabeth of York was born at Westminster, the first child of King Edward IV and Queen Elizabeth Woodville. As England’s eldest princess, Elizabeth should have had it made in the shade—but Elizabeth was not born in peaceful times. Her father had only recently taken England’s throne from the mad King Henry VI, and his crown was far from secure.

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