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  1. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/.../Ferdinand_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor

    Ferdinand I ( Spanish: Fernando I) (10 March 1503 – 25 July 1564) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1556, king of Bohemia and Royal Hungary from 1526, and king of Croatia from 1527 until his death in 1564. Before his accession, he ruled the Austrian hereditary lands of the Habsburgs in the name of his elder brother, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

  2. Ferdinand I | Holy Roman emperor | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Ferdinand-I-Holy...

    Ferdinand I, (born March 10, 1503, Alcalá de Henares, Spain—died July 25, 1564, Vienna, Habsburg domain [now in Austria]), Holy Roman emperor (1558–64) and king of Bohemia and Hungary from 1526, who, with his Peace of Augsburg (1555), concluded the era of religious strife in Germany following the rise of Lutheranism by recognizing the right of territorial princes to determine the religion of their subjects. He also converted the elected crowns of Bohemia and Hungary into hereditary ...

  3. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor Biography – Facts, Childhood ...

    www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/ferdinand-i...

    Ferdinand I (also known as Fernando I in Spanish) served as the Holy Roman Emperor from 1556 (coronation in 1558), the king of Bohemia and Hungary from 1526, and the king of Croatia from 1527, until his death in 1564.

  4. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor | Historipedia Official Wiki ...

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org/wiki/Ferdinand_I...
    • Biography
    • Consolidation of Power in Bohemia
    • Ferdinand and The Augsburg Peace 1555
    • Habsburg Emperor
    • Government
    • Legacy
    • Name in Other Languages
    • Marriage and Children
    • Titles and Styles
    • Coinage

    Overview

    Ferdinand was born in Alcalá de Henares, Spain, the second son of Queen Joanna I of Castile from the House of Trastámara (herself the daughter of the Catholic Monarchs Isabel I of Castile and Ferdinand of Aragon) and Habsburg Archduke Philip the Handsome, who was heir to Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor. Ferdinand shared his customs, culture, name, and even his birthday with his maternal grandfather Ferdinand II of Aragon. He was born, raised, and educated in Spain, and did not learn German w...

    When he took control of the Bohemian lands in the 1520s, their religious situation was complex. Its German population was composed of Catholics and Lutherans. Some Czechs were receptive to Lutheranism, but most of them adhered to Utraquist Hussitism, while a minority of them adhered to Roman Catholicism. A significant number of Utraquists favoured an alliance with the Protestants.At first, Ferdinand accepted this situation and he gave considerable freedom to the Bohemian estates. In the 1540s, the situation changed. In Germany, while most Protestant princes had hitherto favored negotiation with the Emperor and while many had supported him in his wars, they became increasingly confrontational during this decade. Some of them even went to war against the Empire, and many Bohemian (German or Czech) Protestants or Utraquists sympathized with them. Ferdinand and his son Maximilian participated in the victorious campaign of Charles V against the German Protestants in 1547. The same year,...

    In the 1550s, Ferdinand managed to win some key victories on the imperial scene. Unlike his brother, he opposed Albrecht of Brandenburg-Kulmbach and participated in his defeat.This defeat, along with his German ways, made Ferdinand more popular than the Emperor among Protestant princes. This allowed him to play a critical role in the settlement of the religious issue in the Empire. After decades of religious and political unrest in the German states, Charles V ordered a general Diet in Augsburg at which the various states would discuss the religious problem and its solution. Charles himself did not attend, and delegated authority to his brother, Ferdinand, to "act and settle" disputes of territory, religion and local power.At the conference, which opened on 5 February, Ferdinand cajoled, persuaded and threatened the various representatives into agreement on three important principles promulgated on 25 September: 1. The principle of cuius regio, eius religio("Whose realm, his religio...

    Charles abdicated as Emperor in August 1556 in favor of his brother Ferdinand. Given the settlement of 1521 and the election of 1531, Ferdinand became Holy Roman Emperor and suo jure Archduke of Austria. Due to lengthy debate and bureaucratic procedure, the Imperial Diet did not accept the Imperial succession until 3 May 1558. The Pope refused to recognize Ferdinand as Emperor until 1559, when peace was reached between France and the Habsburgs. During his Emperorship, the Council of Trent came to an end. Ferdinand organized an Imperial election in 1562 in order to secure the succession of his son Maximilian II. Venetian ambassadors to Ferdinand recall in their Relazioni the Emperor's pragmatism and his ability to speak multiple languages. Several issues of the Council of Trent were solved after a compromise was personally reached between Emperor Ferdinand and Morone, the papal legate.

    The western rump of Hungary over which Ferdinand retained dominion became known as Royal Hungary. As the ruler of Austria, Bohemia and Royal Hungary, Ferdinand adopted a policy of centralisation and, in common with other monarchs of the time, the construction of an absolute monarchy. In 1527, soon after ascending the throne, he published a constitution for his hereditary domains (Hofstaatsordnung) and established Austrian-style institutions in Pressburg for Hungary, in Prague for Bohemia, and in Breslau for Silesia. Opposition from the nobles in those realms forced him to concede the independence of these institutions from supervision by the Austrian government in Viennain 1559. After the Ottoman invasion of Hungary the traditional Hungarian coronation city, Székesfehérvár came under Turkish occupation. Thus, in 1536 the Hungarian Diet decided that a new place for coronation of the king as well as a meeting place for the Diet itself would be set in Pressburg. Ferdinand proposed that...

    Ferdinand's legacy ultimately proved enduring. Though lacking resources, he managed to defend his land against the Ottomans with limited support from his brother, and even secured a part of Hungary that would later provide the basis for the conquest of the whole kingdom by the Habsburgs. In his own possessions, he built a tax system that, though imperfect, would continue to be used by his successors.His handling of the Protestant Reformation proved more flexible and more effective than that of his brother and he played a key part in the settlement of 1555, which started an era of peace in Germany. His statesmanship, overall, was cautious and effective, well-suited to a medium-sized collection of territories facing dangerous threats. On the other hand, when he engaged in more audacious endeavours, like his offensives against Buda and Pest, it often ended in failure. Ferdinand was also a patron of the arts. He embellished Vienna and Prague, and invited Italian architects to his realm....

    German, Czech, Slovenian, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian: Ferdinand I.; Hungarian: I. Ferdinánd; Spanish: Fernando I; Turkish: 1. Ferdinand; Polish: Ferdynand I.

    On 26 May 1521 in Linz, Austria, Ferdinand married Anna of Bohemia and Hungary (1503–1547), daughter of Vladislaus II of Bohemia and Hungary and his wife Anne de Foix.They had fifteen children, all but two of whom reached adulthood:

    After ascending the Imperial Throne Ferdinand's full titulature, rarely used, went as follows:Ferdinand, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King in Germany, of Hungary, Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, Rama, Serbia, Galicia, Lodomeria, Cumania and Bulgaria, etc. Prince-Infante in Spain, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, Brabant, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Margrave of Moravia, Duke of Luxemburg, the Upper and Lower Silesia, Württemberg and Teck, Prince of Swabia, Princely Count of Habsburg, Tyrol, Ferrette, Kyburg, Gorizia, Landgrave of Alsace, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire, Enns, Burgau, the Upper and Lower Lusatia, Lord of the Wendish March, Pordenone and Salins, etc. etc.

    Ferdinand I has been the main motif for many collector coins and medals, the most recent one is the Austrian silver 20-euro Renaissance coinissued on 12 June 2002. A portrait of Ferdinand I is shown in the reverse of the coin, while in the obverse a view of the Swiss Gate of the Hofburg Palace can be seen.

    • 10 March 1503 Alcalá de Henares, Castile, Spain
    • Joanna of Castile
    • Habsburg
    • Roman Catholicism
  5. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org/en/Ferdinand_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Biography
    • Hungary and The Ottomans
    • Consolidation of Power in Bohemia
    • Ferdinand and The Augsburg Peace 1555
    • Government
    • Legacy
    • Name in Other Languages
    • Marriage and Children
    • Titles and Styles
    • Coinage

    Overview

    Fer­di­nand was born in Alcalá de Henares, Spain, the son of Queen Joanna I of Castile from the House of Trastámara (her­self the daugh­ter of the Catholic Mon­archs Is­abel I of Castile and Fer­di­nand of Aragon) and Hab­s­burg Arch­duke Philip the Hand­some, who was heir to Max­i­m­il­ian I, Holy Roman Em­peror. Fer­di­nand shared his cus­toms, cul­ture, and even his birth­day with his ma­ter­nal grand­fa­ther Fer­di­nand II of Aragon. He was born, raised, and ed­u­cated in Spain, and did n...

    Ac­cord­ing to the terms set at the First Con­gress of Vi­enna in 1515, Fer­di­nand mar­ried Anne Jagiel­lonica, daugh­ter of King Vladis­laus II of Bo­hemia and Hun­gary on 22 July 1515. Both Hun­gary and Bo­hemia were elec­tive monar­chies, where the par­lia­ments had the sov­er­eign right to de­cide about the per­son of the king. There­fore, after the death of his brother-in-law Louis II, King of Bo­hemia and of Hun­gary, at the bat­tle of Mohácson 29 Au­gust 1526, Fer­di­nand im­me­di­ately ap­plied to the par­lia­ments of Hun­gary and Bo­hemia to par­tic­i­pate as a can­di­date in the king elec­tions. On 24 Oc­to­ber 1526 the Bo­hemian Diet, act­ing under the in­flu­ence of chan­cel­lor Adam of Hradce, elected Fer­di­nand King of Bo­hemia under con­di­tions of con­firm­ing tra­di­tional priv­i­leges of the es­tates and also mov­ing the Hab­s­burg court to Prague. The suc­cess was only par­tial, as the Diet re­fused to recog­nise Fer­di­nand as hered­i­tary lord of the King­dom....

    When he took con­trol of the Bo­hemian lands in the 1520s, their re­li­gious sit­u­a­tion was com­plex. Its Ger­man pop­u­la­tion was com­posed of Catholics and Luther­ans. Some Czechs were re­cep­tive to Lutheranism, but most of them ad­hered to Utraquist Hus­sitism, while a mi­nor­ity of them ad­hered to Roman Catholi­cism. A sig­nif­i­cant num­ber of Utraquists favoured an al­liance with the Protestants.At first, Fer­di­nand ac­cepted this sit­u­a­tion and he gave con­sid­er­able free­dom to the Bo­hemian es­tates. In the 1540s, the sit­u­a­tion changed. In Ger­many, while most Protes­tant princes had hith­erto fa­vored ne­go­ti­a­tion with the Em­peror and while many had sup­ported him in his wars, they be­came in­creas­ingly con­fronta­tional dur­ing this decade. Some of them even went to war against the Em­pire, and many Bo­hemian (Ger­man or Czech) Protes­tants or Utraquists sym­pa­thized with them. Fer­di­nand and his son Max­i­m­il­ian par­tic­i­pated in the vic­to­ri­ous c...

    In the 1550s, Fer­di­nand man­aged to win some key vic­to­ries on the im­pe­r­ial scene. Un­like his brother, he op­posed Al­brecht of Bran­den­burg-Kulm­bach and par­tic­i­pated in his defeat.This de­feat, along with his Ger­man ways, made Fer­di­nand more pop­u­lar than the Em­peror among Protes­tant princes. This al­lowed him to play a crit­i­cal role in the set­tle­ment of the re­li­gious issue in the Em­pire. After decades of re­li­gious and po­lit­i­cal un­rest in the Ger­man states, Charles V or­dered a gen­eral Diet in Augs­burg at which the var­i­ous states would dis­cuss the re­li­gious prob­lem and its so­lu­tion. Charles him­self did not at­tend, and del­e­gated au­thor­ity to his brother, Fer­di­nand, to "act and set­tle" dis­putes of ter­ri­tory, re­li­gion and local power.At the con­fer­ence, which opened on 5 Feb­ru­ary, Fer­di­nand ca­joled, per­suaded and threat­ened the var­i­ous rep­re­sen­ta­tives into agree­ment on three im­por­tant prin­ci­ples pro­mul­gated o...

    The west­ern rump of Hun­gary over which Fer­di­nand re­tained do­min­ion be­came known as Royal Hun­gary. As the ruler of Aus­tria, Bo­hemia and Royal Hun­gary, Fer­di­nand adopted a pol­icy of cen­tral­i­sa­tion and, in com­mon with other mon­archs of the time, the con­struc­tion of an ab­solute monar­chy. In 1527, soon after as­cend­ing the throne, he pub­lished a con­sti­tu­tion for his hered­i­tary do­mains (Hof­staats­ord­nung) and es­tab­lished Aus­trian-style in­sti­tu­tions in Press­burg for Hun­gary, in Prague for Bo­hemia, and in Bres­lau for Sile­sia. Op­po­si­tion from the no­bles in those realms forced him to con­cede the in­de­pen­dence of these in­sti­tu­tions from su­per­vi­sion by the Aus­trian gov­ern­ment in Vi­ennain 1559. After the Ot­toman in­va­sion of Hun­gary the tra­di­tional Hun­gar­ian coro­na­tion city, Székesfehérvár came under Turk­ish oc­cu­pa­tion. Thus, in 1536 the Hun­gar­ian Diet de­cided that a new place for coro­na­tion of the king as well as a...

    Fer­di­nand's legacy ul­ti­mately proved en­dur­ing. Though lack­ing re­sources, he man­aged to de­fend his land against the Ot­tomans with lim­ited sup­port from his brother, and even se­cured a part of Hun­gary that would later pro­vide the basis for the con­quest of the whole king­dom by the Hab­s­burgs. In his own pos­ses­sions, he built a tax sys­tem that, though im­per­fect, would con­tinue to be used by his successors.His han­dling of the Protes­tant Re­for­ma­tion proved more flex­i­ble and more ef­fec­tive than that of his brother and he played a key part in the set­tle­ment of 1555, which started an era of peace in Ger­many. His states­man­ship, over­all, was cau­tious and ef­fec­tive, well-suited to a medium-sized col­lec­tion of ter­ri­to­ries fac­ing dan­ger­ous threats. On the other hand, when he en­gaged in more au­da­cious en­deav­ours, like his of­fen­sives against Buda and Pest, it often ended in fail­ure. Fer­di­nand was also a pa­tron of the arts. He em­bell­ishe...

    Ger­man, Czech, Sloven­ian, Slo­vak, Ser­bian, Croa­t­ian: Ferdinand I.; Hun­gar­ian: I. Ferdinánd; Span­ish: Fer­nan­do I; Turk­ish: 1. Ferdinand; Pol­ish: Fer­dy­nand I.

    On 26 May 1521 in Linz, Aus­tria, Fer­di­nand mar­ried Anna of Bo­hemia and Hun­gary (1503–1547), daugh­ter of Vladis­laus II of Bo­hemia and Hun­gary and his wife Anne de Foix. They had fif­teen chil­dren, all but two of whom reached adult­hood:

    After as­cend­ing the Im­pe­r­ial Throne Fer­di­nand's full tit­u­la­ture, rarely used, went as fol­lows:Fer­di­nand, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Em­peror, for­ever Au­gust, King in Ger­many, of Hun­gary, Bo­hemia, Dal­ma­tia, Croa­tia, Slavo­nia, Rama, Ser­bia, Gali­cia, Lodome­ria, Cu­ma­nia and Bul­garia, etc. Prince-In­fante in Spain, Arch­duke of Aus­tria, Duke of Bur­gundy, Bra­bant, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Mar­grave of Moravia, Duke of Lux­em­burg, the Upper and Lower Sile­sia, Würt­tem­berg and Teck, Prince of Swabia, Princely Count of Hab­s­burg, Tyrol, Fer­rette, Ky­burg, Go­rizia, Land­grave of Al­sace, Mar­grave of the Holy Roman Em­pire, Enns, Bur­gau, the Upper and Lower Lusa­tia, Lord of the Wendish March, Por­de­none and Salins, etc. etc.

    Fer­di­nand I has been the main motif for many col­lec­tor coins and medals, the most re­cent one is the fa­mous sil­ver 20-euro Re­nais­sance coinis­sued on 12 June 2002. A por­trait of Fer­di­nand I is shown in the re­verse of the coin, while in the ob­verse a view of the Swiss Gate of the Hof­burg Palace can be seen.

  6. Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I - 1556-1564

    www.holyromanempireassociation.com/holy-roman-emperor...

    Ferdinand I (Spanish: Fernando I) (10 March 1503 – 25 July 1564) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1558, king of Bohemia and Hungary from 1526, and king of Croatia from 1527 until his death. Before his accession, he ruled the Austrian hereditary lands of the Habsburgs in the name of his elder brother, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

  7. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor | Project Gutenberg Self ...

    self.gutenberg.org/.../eng/Ferdinand_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Biography
    • Consolidation of Power in Bohemia
    • Ferdinand and The Augsburg Peace 1555
    • Government
    • Legacy
    • Name in Other Languages
    • Marriage and Children
    • Titles and Styles
    • Coinage
    • See Also

    Overview

    Ferdinand was born in Alcalá de Henares, Spain, the son of the Trastamara Princess Joanna ("Joanna the Mad"), and Habsburg Archduke Philip the Handsome, who was heir to Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor. Ferdinand shared his customs, culture, and even his birthday with his maternal grandfather Ferdinand II of Aragon. He was born, raised, and educated in Spain, and did not learn German when he was young. On the death of his grandfather Maximilian I and the accession of his 19-year-old brother,...

    Hungary and the Ottomans

    According to the terms set at the First Congress of Vienna in 1515, Ferdinand married Anne Jagiellonica, daughter of King Vladislaus II of Bohemia and Hungary on 22 July 1515. Therefore, after the death of his brother-in-law Louis II, King of Bohemia and of Hungary, at the battle of Mohács on 29 August 1526, Ferdinand inherited both Kingdoms. On 24 October 1526 the Bohemian Diet, acting under the influence of chancellor Adam of Hradce elected Ferdinand King of Bohemia under conditions of conf...

    When he took control of the Bohemian land in the 1520s, their religious situation was complex. Its German population was composed of Catholics and Lutherans. Some Czechs were receptive to Lutheranism, but most of them adhered to Utraquism. A significant number of utraquists favored an alliance with the Protestants.At first, Ferdinand accepted this situation and he gave considerable freedom to the Bohemian estates. In the 1540s, the situation changed. In Germany, while most Protestant princes had hitherto favored negotiation with the Emperor and while many had actually supported him in his wars, they became increasingly confrontational during this decade. Some of them even went to war against the Empire, and many Bohemian (German or Czech) Protestants or utraquists sympathized with them. Ferdinand and his son Maximilian participated in the victorious campaign of Charles V against the German Protestants in 1547. The same year, he also defeated a Protestant revolt in Bohemia, where the...

    In the 1550s, Ferdinand managed to win some key victories on the imperial scene. Unlike his brother, he opposed Albrecht of Brandenburg-Kulmbach and participated in his defeat.This defeat, along with his German ways, made Ferdinand more popular than the Emperor among Protestant princes. This allowed him to play a critical role in the settlement of the religious issue in the Empire. After decades of religious and political unrest in the German states, Charles V ordered a general Diet in Augsburg at which the various states would discuss the religious problem and its solution. Charles himself did not attend, and delegated authority to his brother, Ferdinand, to "act and settle" disputes of territory, religion and local power.At the conference, which opened on 5 February, Ferdinand cajoled, persuaded and threatened the various representatives into agreement on three important principles promulgated on 25 September: 1. The principle of cuius regio, eius religio("Whose realm, his religio...

    The western rump of Hungary over which Ferdinand retained dominion became known as Royal Hungary. As the ruler of Austria, Bohemia and Royal Hungary, Ferdinand adopted a policy of centralisation and, in common with other monarchs of the time, the construction of an absolute monarchy. In 1527, soon after ascending the throne, he published a constitution for his hereditary domains (Hofstaatsordnung) and established Austrian-style institutions in Pressburg for Hungary, in Prague for Bohemia, and in Breslau for Silesia. Opposition from the nobles in those realms forced him to concede the independence of these institutions from supervision by the Austrian government in Viennain 1559. After the Ottoman invasion of Hungary the traditional Hungarian coronation city, Székesfehérvár came under Turkish occupation. Thus, in 1536 the Hungarian Diet decided that a new place for coronation of the king as well as a meeting place for the Diet itself would be set in Pressburg. Ferdinand proposed that...

    Ferdinand's legacy ultimately proved enduring. Though lacking resources, he managed to defend his land against the Ottomans with limited support from his brother, and even secured a part of Hungary that would later provide the basis for the conquest of the whole kingdom by the Habsburgs. In his own possessions, he built a tax system that, though imperfect, would continue to be used by his successors.His handling of the Protestant reformation proved more flexible and more effective than that of his brother and he played a key part in the settlement of 1555, which started an era of peace in Germany. His statesmanship, overall, was cautious and effective, well-suited to a medium-sized collection of territories facing dangerous threats. On the other hand, when he engaged in more audacious endeavours, like his offensives against Buda and Pest, it often ended in failure. Ferdinand was also a patron of the arts. He embellished Vienna and Prague, and invited Italian architects to his realm....

    German, Czech, Slovenian, Slovak, Serbian, Croatian: Ferdinand I.; Hungarian: I. Ferdinánd; Spanish: Fernando I; Turkish: 1. Ferdinand; Polish: Ferdynand I.

    On 25 May 1521 in Linz, Austria, Ferdinand married Anna of Bohemia and Hungary (1503–1547), daughter of Vladislaus II of Bohemia and Hungary and his wife Anne de Foix. They had fifteen children, all but two of whom reached adulthood:

    After ascending the Imperial Throne Ferdinand's full titulature, rarely used, went as follows: Ferdinand, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King in Germany, of Hungary, Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, Rama, Serbia, Galicia, Lodomeria, Cumania and Bulgaria, etc. Prince-Infante in Spain, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, Brabant, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Margrave of Moravia, Duke of Luxemburg, the Upper and Lower Silesia, Württemberg and Teck, Prince of Swabia, Princely Count of Habsburg, Tyrol, Ferrette, Kyburg, Gorizia, Landgrave of Alsace, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire, Enns, Burgau, the Upper and Lower Lusatia, Lord of the Wendish March, Pordenone and Salins, etc. etc.

    Ferdinand I has been the main motif for many collector coins and medals, the most recent one is the famous silver 20 euro Renaissance coinissued in 12 June 2002. A portrait of Ferdinand I is shown in the reverse of the coin, while in the obverse a view of the Swiss Gate of the Hofburg Palace can be seen.

  8. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikiquote

    en.wikiquote.org/.../Ferdinand_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor

    Sep 26, 2015 · Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (10 March 1503 – 25 July 1564) reigned as archiduke of Austria from 1521, king of Hungary, Bohemia and Croatia from 1526 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1556 till his death.

  9. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor - geni family tree

    www.geni.com/people/Ferdinand-I-Holy-Roman...

    About Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor Archduke of Austria1521 King of Bohemia and Hungary 1526. King of Croatia, Dalmatia, Slavonia, and formally king of Serbia, Galicia (in Eastern Europe) and Lodomeria, etc.

  10. Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor (Holy Roman Emperor, 1503-1564, ruled from 1558) Ferdinand I, empereur germanique, 1503-1564. Ferdinand I, imperatore del Sacro romano impero, 1503-1564. Ferdinand I, keizer van het Duitse Rijk, 1503-1564.

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