Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 112,000 search results

  1. Frances Kathleen Kelsey CM ( née Oldham; July 24, 1914 – August 7, 2015) was a Canadian-American [1] pharmacologist and physician. As a reviewer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), she refused to authorize thalidomide for market because she had concerns about the lack of evidence regarding the drug's safety. [2]

  2. Frances Oldham Kelsey, recipient of the highest recognition attainable for a U. S. civil servant for her role in saving perhaps thousands from death or life-long incapacitation, had a long an...

  3. In 1938 she earned her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and went on to teach there from 1938 to 1950. Dr. Frances Oldham married Dr. Fremont Ellis Kelsey, a fellow faculty member at University of Chicago, in 1943. Their two daughters were born while she earned her medical degree at the University of Chicago Medical School.

    • Education
    • Early Career
    • Thalidomide
    • Career in The FDA
    • Honours
    • Legacy
    • Thalidomide in Canada

    Frances Oldham was born in Cobble Hill on Vancouver Island, the daughter of a retired British army officer. She received a Bachelor of Science (1934) and a Master of Science (1935) from McGill University. Following graduation, she continued working with her supervisor, pharmacology professor Dr. Stehle. In 1936, Stehle encouraged her to apply for a...

    Frances Oldham continued postgraduate work with the pharmacology department at the University of Chicago. During the Second World War, she was part of a research team tasked with finding and testing new antimalarial drugs. She also met Dr. Fremont Ellis Kelsey, a fellow faculty member, whom she married in 1943. However, the university had a policy ...

    A month after she started working for the FDA, Frances Oldham Kelsey was assigned to the Bureau of Medicine as a reviewing officer for new drug applications. One of her first reviews was an application by the Merrell Company to sell thalidomide in the United States. Thalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug, was developed in Germany in the 1950s. It wa...

    Frances Oldham Kelsey’s involvement in the thalidomide case contributed to improved drug regulations in the United States. In 1962, the government enacted the Kefauver-Harris Drug Amendments, which required that 1) drugs had to be shown to be both safe and effective; 2) adverse reactions had to be reported to the FDA; and 3) informed consent had to...

    On 7 August 1962, Frances Oldham Kelsey received the President’s Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service from President John F. Kennedy. During the presentation, she was commended for her exceptional judgment in evaluating a new drug for safety for human use [that] prevented a major tragedy of birth deformities in the United States. Throug...

    Frances Oldham Kelsey’s professionalism, insight and strength of character likely saved thousands of American children from severe deformities and disabilities. It is estimated that over 10,000 children in 46 countries were born with deformities because of thalidomide (it is unknown how many babies died, were stillborn, or miscarried because of the...

    In Canada, over 100 children were born with severe defects caused by thalidomide. The drug became available as a sample in late 1959, and as a prescription medication in April 1961 after it was approved for sale by the Department of Health and Welfare. It continued to be sold on the Canadian market until March 1962, three months after it was pulled...

  4. Mar 9, 2020 · Frances Oldham Kelsey, MD, PhD, then 96 and frail, was chaperoned by her two daughters for the occasion. She beamed as FDA leaders honored her in speeches before presenting her with the Dr. Frances O. Kelsey Award for Excellence and Courage in Protecting the Public Health. "It was pretty moving," recalled FDA historian John Swann.

  5. Dr. Kelsey authored numerous articles in well recognized scientific journals and was the recipient of several prestigious awards and honorary degrees. A woman of courage and a woman of reason. Dr.Kelsey demanded of herself and others in her profession high standards of science and integrity.

  1. People also search for