Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 233,000 search results
  1. Franz Peter Schubert was born in Himmelpfortgrund (now a part of Alsergrund ), Vienna, Archduchy of Austria on 31 January 1797, and baptised in the Catholic Church the following day. He was the twelfth child of Franz Theodora Florian Schubert (1763–1830) and Maria Elisabeth Katharina Vietz (1756–1812).

  2. Apr 02, 2014 · Franz was the fourth surviving son of Franz Theodor Schubert, a schoolmaster, and his wife, Elisabeth, a homemaker. His family cultivated Schubert's love of music.

  3. Franz Schubert, Soundtrack: Minority Report. Schubert was musically educated at the "Hofkapelle" in Vienna where he sang as a boy but then had to quit in order to help his father at school. Four years later, he became an independent composer and was destined to live in poverty from then onwards. Having an introverted personality, Schubert played his songs mostly amongst a couple of friends ...

    • Soundtrack, Music Department, Composer
    • January 31, 1797
    • Franz Schubert
    • November 19, 1828
    • Biography
    • Music
    • Media
    • Further Reading
    • External Links

    Early life and education

    Schubert was born in Vienna, Austria on January 31, 1797. His father Franz Theodor Florian, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother Elizabeth Vietz was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of the Schuberts' fifteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1789), ten died in infancy; only four survived. Their father Franz Theodor was a well-known teacher, and his school on the Hi...

    Teacher at his father's school

    At the end of 1813 he left the Stadtkonvikt and entered his father's school as teacher of the lowest class. In the meantime, his father remarried, this time to Anna Kleyenboeck, the daughter of a silk dealer from the suburb Gumpendorf. For over two years the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success. There were, however, other interests to compensate. He received private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s trainin...

    Supported by friends

    As 1815 was the most prolific period of Schubert's life, 1816 saw the first real change in his fortunes. Somewhere about the turn of the year Spaun surprised him in the composition of Erlkönig (D.328, published as Op.1) — Goethe's poem propped among a heap of exercise books, and the boy at white-heat of inspiration "hurling" the notes on the music-paper. A few weeks later Franz von Schober, a student of good family and some means, who had heard some of Schubert's songs at Spaun's house, came...

    Template:Expand-sectionSchubert composed music for a wide range of ensembles and in various genres including opera, liturgical music, chamber and solo piano music. While he was clearly influenced by the Classical sonata forms of Mozart and Beethoven (his early works, among them notably the 5th Symphony, are particularly Mozartian), his formal structures and his developments tend to give the impression more of melodic development than of harmonic drama. This sometimes lends them a discursive style: his music was described by Robert Schumann as running to "heavenly lengths". His innovations in the Classical style include the earliest examples of sonata form in which the exposition ends in the subdominant rather than the dominant (as in the last movement of the Trout Quintet). He also expanded the range and emotional expression of the Lied and the song cycle.

    Template:Multi-listen startTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen itemTemplate:Multi-listen end

    Template:Wikisourcepar 1. Brian Newbould, Schubert: The Music and the Man. University of California Press, 1999. ISBN 0-520-21957-0. 2. Christopher H. Gibbs [ed.], "The Cambridge Companion to Schubert", Cambridge University Press, 1997. 3. Christopher H. Gibbs, The Life Of Schubert, Cambridge University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-521-59512-6 4. Rita Steblin, "Schubert's Relationship with Women: An Historical Account," in: Schubert Studies, ed. Brian Newbould, Ashgate, 1998, pp. 159-182. 5. Rita Steblin, "In Defense of Scholarship and Archival Research: Why Schubert's Brothers Were Allowed to Marry," Current Musicology 62 (1998): 7-17.

    Template:Musicbrainz artist
    Template:Ibdb name
    Template:Imdb name
  4. Schubert was born in the Himmelpfortgrund, a small suburb of Vienna. His father Franz Theodor Florian, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother Elizabeth Vietz, was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage.

    • January 31, 1797
    • November 19, 1828
  1. People also search for