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  1. Vladimir was the paternal grandfather and namesake of the future pretender claimant Grand Duke Vladimir of Russia, born 1917. Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich's great granddaughter, Grand Duchess Maria Vladimirovna, is the current claimant. Honours and awards. The Grand Duke received the following Russian and foreign decorations: Russian

  2. Jan 20, 2021 · About Vladimir Alexandrovich Romanov, Grand Duke of Russia (Français) Vladimir Alexandrovitch de Russie (en russe : Влади́мир Александрович из России / Vladímir Aleksandrocitch iz Rossii), grand-duc de Russie, est né le 22 avril 1847 à Saint-Pétersbourg, en Russie, et mort le 17 février 1909 dans cette même ...

    • April 22, 1847
    • St. Petersburg, Russia
  3. Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia (* 22.4.1847, O 28.8.1874, † 17.2.1909) Emperor Alexander III of Russia Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia

    • 22.4.1847 in Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
    • Emperor Alexander II of Russia
    • Early Life
    • A Russian Grand Duke
    • Marriage
    • Vladimir's Palace
    • Children
    • During Three Reigns
    • Last Years
    • References

    Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich was born on April 22, 1847 in Saint Petersburg. He was the fourth child and third son among the eight children of Alexander II of Russia and his wife Maria Alexandrovna, born Duchess Marie of Hesse-Darmstadt. He was eight years old when at the death of his grand father Nicholas I, his father became Russian Tsar. Grand Duke Vladimir was well educated and through his life he was interested in literature and the arts. However, as all male members of the Romanov family he had to follow a military career. As only the third son in a numerous family, he was far from the succession to the Russian throne. Nevertheless, in 1863, the early death of his eldest brother, the Tsarevich Nicholas, left Vladimir unexpectedly close to the throne as heir presumptive after his second brother Alexander. Unlike Alexander, the new heir, Vladimir was witty and ambitious. Rumors circulated at the time, that Alexander II would have his eldest surviving son removed from the su...

    In 1867 Grand Duke Vladimir was named honorary president of the Russian ethnographic society, the same year he accompanied his father and his brother Alexander to the World Fair in Paris, where his father was shot by a polish nationalist. In 1871 he visited the Caucasus region, Georgia, Chechnya and Dagestan with his father and his brothers.In 1872 he accompanied his father to Vienna at the reunion of the three emperors: Russia, Germany and Austria. In his youth Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich led a restless life of partying and drinking. A member of the European jet set of his time, he made frequent trips to Paris. At the French capital, he was nicknamed "The Grand Duke, bon vivant". His love for the good life let him to be portly at a young age, although later he slimmed down. He had a wide range of interest. He loved the arts; was a skillful painter himself and gathered an important book collection. Not as tall as his brothers, he was handsome with an imposing personality but c...

    While traveling through Germany with his family in June 1871, Grand Duke Vladimir met Duchess Marie Alexandrine of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (14 May 1854 – 6 September 1920), daughter of Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Augusta of Reuss-Köstritz. She was seventeen years old and was already engage to a distant relative, Prince George of Schwarzburg. Grand Duke Vladimir was then twenty four. They were smitten with each other. Maria was a great-granddaughter of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia, herself a daughter of Emperor Paul I of Russia. Therefore, Vladimir was a second cousin of Maria's father Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. However, in descent from Frederick William III of Prussia, the couple were second cousins. In order to marry Vladimir, Maria broke off her previous engagement, but she refused to yield to the necessary conversion to the Orthodox religion.This delayed the couple's engagement for almost two years. Finally, Tsar...

    By the time of his marriage, construction has already been completed in Vladimir's own residence and he moved there with his wife. Named the Vladimir Palace, it was the last imperial palace to be constructed in Saint Petersburg. Grand Duke Vladimir appointed architect Aleksandr Rezanov responsible for the project because of his knowledge of ancient Russian architecture. Rezanov was assisted by a team of architects: Vasily Kenel, Andrei Huhn, Ieronim Kitner and Vladimir Shreter. The foundation stone was laid on July 15, 1867.Construction work lasted five years, from 1867 to 1872. The furniture was designed by architect Victor Shroeter. The site chosen for the palace was the Embankment near the Winter Palace in the center of St Petersburg. It had been previously been occupied by the house of Count Vorontsov Dashkov which had been bought by the treasury. The lot was enlarge by purchasing the neighboring house of Madame Karatinga.The total construction and furnishing cost of Vladimir pa...

    Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich and his wife Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna had five children: 1. Grand Duke Alexander Vladimirovich of Russia (31 August 1875 – 16 March 1877). He died in infancy 2. Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich of Russia (12 October (N.S.), 1876 – 12 October 1938). He married his first cousin Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. They had three children. 3. Grand Duke Boris Vladimirovich of Russia(1877–1943). He married his mistress Zinaida Rashevskaya. He did not leave legitimate descendants. 4. Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich of Russia (1879–1956). He married his mistress Matilda Kchessinska. He did not leave legitimate descendants. 5. Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia (1882–1957). She married Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark, third son of George I of Greece and Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia. They had three daughters.

    Grand Duke Vladimir occupied important military positions during three reigns. He experienced the battle fields in the Russo-Turkish War of (1877–1878) attending the war's campaign with his father and brothers Alexander and Sergei. He fought against the Turkish troops as the commanding officer of the XII Corps of the Russian army. However his military career interested him less than art and literature. In 1880, his father appointed him President of the Imperial Academy of Fine Arts. He was also a member of the Academy of Science and agent of the Rumyantsev Museum. Grand Duke Vladimir was in the Imperial capital when his father was killed and was succeeded by Alexander III in 1881. It fell upon Vladimir, who regained his composure more quickly than his brother, to announce their father's death to the public. Vladimir inherited his father's personal library which the grand duke added to his large book collection that was arranged in three libraries at the Vladimir Palace.After the Rus...

    In January 1905 a wave of strikes broke out in St. Petersburg. On January 4/22 a peaceful procession of workers lead by a priest, Father Georgy Gapon, marched towards the Winter Palace from different points in the city hoping to present request for reforms directly to Emperor Nicholas II. The Tsar, however, was not in the capital. General Fullon, St Petersburg Governor, tried to stop the march. When a large group of workers reached Winter Palace Square, troops acting on direct orders from Guards Commander Prince Vasilchikov opened fire upon the demonstrators. More than 100 marchers were killed and several hundred were wounded. Although Grand Duke Vladimir claimed no direct responsibility about that tragedy, since he was also away from the city, his reputation was tarnished. The massacre, known as Bloody Sunday, was followed by a series of strikes in other cities, peasant uprisings in the country, and mutinies in the armed forces, which seriously threatened the tsarist regime and bec...

    Belyakova, Zoia. The Romanov Legacy, The Palaces of St Petersburg. Studio, ISBN 0-670-86339-4
    King, Greg The Court of the Last Tsar. Wiley, 2006, ISBN 978-0-471-72763-7.
    • Early Life
    • A Russian Grand Duke
    • Marriage
    • Vladimir's Palace
    • Children
    • During Three Reigns
    • Last Years
    • References

    Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich was born on April 22, 1847 at Tsarskoye Selo, some twenty miles (32 km) outside Saint Petersburg. He was the fourth child and third son among the eight children of Alexander II of Russia and his wife Maria Alexandrovna, born Duchess Marie of Hesse-Darmstadt. He was eight years old when at the death of his grand father Nicholas I, his father became Russian Tsar. Grand Duke Vladimir was well educated and through his life he was interested in literature and the arts. However, as all male members of the Romanov family he had to follow a military career. As only the third son in a numerous family, he was far from the succession to the Russian throne. Nevertheless, in 1865, the early death of his eldest brother, the Tsarevich Nicholas, left Vladimir unexpectedly close to the throne as heir presumptive after his second brother Alexander. Unlike Alexander, the new heir, Vladimir was witty and ambitious. Rumors circulated at the time, that Alexander II would...

    In 1867 Grand Duke Vladimir was named honorary president of the Russian ethnographic society, the same year he accompanied his father and his brother Alexander to the World Fair in Paris, where his father was shot by a Polish nationalist. In 1871 he visited the Caucasus region, Georgia, Chechnya and Dagestan with his father and his brothers.In 1872 he accompanied his father to Vienna at the reunion of the three emperors: Russia, Germany and Austria. In his youth Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich led a restless life of partying and drinking. A member of the European jet set of his time, he made frequent trips to Paris. At the French capital, he was nicknamed "The Grand Duke, bon vivant". His love for the good life let him to be portly at a young age, although later he slimmed down. He had a wide range of interest. He loved the arts; was a skillful painter himself and gathered an important book collection. Not as tall as his brothers, he was handsome with an imposing personality but c...

    While traveling through Germany with his family in June 1871, Grand Duke Vladimir met Duchess Marie Alexandrine of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (14 May 1854 – 6 September 1920), daughter of Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Augusta of Reuss-Köstritz. She was seventeen years old and was already engage to a distant relative, Prince George of Schwarzburg. Grand Duke Vladimir was then twenty four. They were smitten with each other. Maria was a great-granddaughter of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia, herself a daughter of Emperor Paul I of Russia. Therefore, Vladimir was a second cousin of Maria's father Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. However, in descent from Frederick William III of Prussia, the couple were second cousins. In order to marry Vladimir, Maria broke off her previous engagement, but she refused to yield to the necessary conversion to the Orthodox religion.This delayed the couple's engagement for almost two years. Finally, Tsar...

    By the time of his marriage, construction has already been completed in Vladimir's own residence and he moved there with his wife. Named the Vladimir Palace, it was the last imperial palace to be constructed in Saint Petersburg. Grand Duke Vladimir appointed architect Aleksandr Rezanov responsible for the project because of his knowledge of ancient Russian architecture. Rezanov was assisted by a team of architects: Vasily Kenel, Andrei Huhn, Ieronim Kitner and Vladimir Shreter. The foundation stone was laid on July 15, 1867.Construction work lasted five years, from 1867 to 1872. The furniture was designed by architect Victor Shroeter. The site chosen for the palace was the Embankment near the Winter Palace in the center of St Petersburg. It had been previously been occupied by the house of Count Vorontsov Dashkov which had been bought by the treasury. The lot was enlarge by purchasing the neighboring house of Madame Karatinga.The total construction and furnishing cost of Vladimir pa...

    Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich and his wife Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna had five children: 1. Grand Duke Alexander Vladimirovich of Russia (31 August 1875 – 16 March 1877). He died in infancy 2. Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich of Russia (12 October (N.S.), 1876 – 12 October 1938). He married his first cousin Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. They had three children. 3. Grand Duke Boris Vladimirovich of Russia(1877–1943). He married his mistress Zinaida Rashevskaya. He did not leave legitimate descendants. 4. Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich of Russia (1879–1956). He married his mistress Matilda Kchessinska. He did not leave legitimate descendants. 5. Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia (1882–1957). She married Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark, third son of George I of Greece and Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia. They had three daughters.

    Grand Duke Vladimir occupied important military positions during three reigns. He experienced the battle fields in the Russo-Turkish War of (1877–1878) attending the war's campaign with his father and brothers Alexander and Sergei. He fought against the Turkish troops as the commanding officer of the XII Corps of the Russian army. However his military career interested him less than art and literature. In 1880, his father appointed him President of the Imperial Academy of Fine Arts. He was also a member of the Academy of Science and agent of the Rumyantsev Museum. Grand Duke Vladimir was in the Imperial capital when his father was killed and was succeeded by Alexander III in 1881. It fell upon Vladimir, who regained his composure more quickly than his brother, to announce their father's death to the public. Vladimir inherited his father's personal library which the grand duke added to his large book collection that was arranged in three libraries at the Vladimir Palace.After the Rus...

    In January 1905 a wave of strikes broke out in St. Petersburg. On January 9(O.S.)/22(N.S.) a peaceful procession of workers led by a priest, Father Georgy Gapon, marched towards the Winter Palace from different points in the city hoping to present request for reforms directly to Emperor Nicholas II. The Tsar, however, was not in the capital. General Fullon, St Petersburg Governor, tried to stop the march. When a large group of workers reached Winter Palace Square, troops acting on direct orders from Guards Commander Prince Vasilchikov opened fire upon the demonstrators. More than 100 marchers were killed and several hundred were wounded. Although Grand Duke Vladimir claimed no direct responsibility about that tragedy, since he was also away from the city, his reputation was tarnished. The massacre, known as Bloody Sunday, was followed by a series of strikes in other cities, peasant uprisings in the country, and mutinies in the armed forces, which seriously threatened the tsarist reg...

    Belyakova, Zoia; The Romanov Legacy, The Palaces of St Petersburg, Studio, ISBN 0-670-86339-4
    Chavchavadze, David; The Grand Dukes, Atlantic, 1989, ISBN 0-938311-11-5
    King, Greg; The Court of the Last Tsar, Wiley, 2006, ISBN 978-0-471-72763-7
    • Early Life
    • A Russian Grand Duke
    • Vladimir's Palace
    • Children
    • During Three Reigns
    • Last Years
    • References

    Grand Duke Vladimir Alexan­drovich was born on 22 April 1847 at the Win­ter Palace in Saint Pe­ters­burg. He was fourth among the eight chil­dren of Alexan­der II of Rus­sia and his wife Maria Alexan­drovna, born Princess Marie of Hesse-Darm­stadt. He was eight years old when at the death of his grand­fa­ther Nicholas I, his fa­ther be­came Russ­ian tsar. Grand Duke Vladimir was well ed­u­cated and through his life he was in­ter­ested in lit­er­a­ture and the arts. How­ever, as all male mem­bers of the Ro­manov fam­ily he had to fol­low a mil­i­tary ca­reer. As only the third son in a nu­mer­ous fam­ily, he was far from the suc­ces­sion to the Russ­ian throne. Nev­er­the­less, in 1865, the early death of his el­dest brother, the Tsare­vich Nicholas, left Vladimir un­ex­pect­edly close to the throne as heir pre­sump­tive after his sec­ond brother Alexander. Un­like Alexan­der, the new heir, Vladimir was witty and am­bi­tious. Ru­mors cir­cu­lated at the time, that Alexan­der II would...

    In 1867 Grand Duke Vladimir was named hon­orary pres­i­dent of the Russ­ian ethno­graphic so­ci­ety, the same year he ac­com­pa­nied his fa­ther and his brother Alexan­der to the World Fair in Paris, where his fa­ther was shot by a Pol­ish nationalist. In 1871 he vis­ited the Cau­ca­sus re­gion, Geor­gia, Chech­nya and Dages­tan with his fa­ther and his brothers.In 1872 he ac­com­pa­nied his fa­ther to Vi­enna at the re­union of the three em­per­ors: Rus­sia, Ger­many and Austria. A mem­ber of the Eu­ro­pean jet set of his time, he made fre­quent trips to Paris. He be­came portly as a young man, al­though in later life he slimmed down. He was a skill­ful painter and gath­ered an im­por­tant book col­lec­tion. He was a well known gourmet, ac­cu­mu­lat­ing a col­lec­tion of menus copied after meals, adding no­ta­tions with his im­pres­sions about the food.

    By the time of his mar­riage, con­struc­tion had al­ready been com­pleted on Vladimir's own res­i­dence and he moved there with his wife. Named the Vladimir Palace, it was the last im­pe­r­ial palace to be con­structed in Saint Pe­ters­burg. Grand Duke Vladimir ap­pointed ar­chi­tect Alek­sandr Rezanov to head the pro­ject be­cause of his knowl­edge of an­cient Russ­ian architecture. Rezanov was as­sisted by a team of ar­chi­tects: Vasily Kenel, An­drei Huhn, Ieronim Kit­ner and Vladimir Shreter. The foun­da­tion stone was laid on July 15, 1867.Con­struc­tion work lasted five years, from 1867 to 1872. The fur­ni­ture was de­signed by ar­chi­tect Vic­tor Shroeter. The site cho­sen for the palace was the Em­bank­ment near the Win­ter Palace in the cen­ter of St Petersburg. It had been pre­vi­ously been oc­cu­pied by the house of Count Vorontsov Dashkov which had been bought by the trea­sury. The lot was en­larged by pur­chas­ing the neigh­bor­ing house of Madame Karatinga.The total co...

    Grand Duke Vladimir Alexan­drovich and his wife Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna had five chil­dren: 1. Grand Duke Alexander Vladimirovich of Russia (31 August 1875 – 16 March 1877). He died in infancy 2. Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich of Russia (12 October (N.S.), 1876 – 12 October 1938). He married his first cousin Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. They had three children. 3. Grand Duke Boris Vladimirovich of Russia(1877–1943). He married his mistress Zinaida Rashevskaya. He did not leave legitimate descendants. 4. Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich of Russia (1879–1956). He married his mistress Matilda Kchessinska. They had one son. 5. Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia (1882–1957). She married Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark, third son of George I of Greece and Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia. They had three daughters.

    Grand Duke Vladimir oc­cu­pied im­por­tant mil­i­tary po­si­tions dur­ing three reigns. He ex­pe­ri­enced bat­tle in the Russo-Turk­ish War of (1877–1878), at­tend­ing the war cam­paign with his fa­ther and broth­ers Alexan­der and Sergei. He fought against the Turk­ish troops as the com­mand­ing of­fi­cer of the XII Corps of the Russ­ian army. How­ever his mil­i­tary ca­reer in­ter­ested him less than art and literature. In 1880, his fa­ther ap­pointed him Pres­i­dent of the Im­pe­r­ial Acad­emy of Fine Arts. He was also a mem­ber of the Acad­emy of Sci­ence and agent of the Rumyant­sev Museum. Grand Duke Vladimir was in the Im­pe­r­ial cap­i­tal when his fa­ther was killed and was suc­ceeded by Alexan­der III in 1881. It fell upon Vladimir, who re­gained his com­po­sure more quickly than his brother, to an­nounce their fa­ther's death to the public. Vladimir in­her­ited his fa­ther's per­sonal li­brary which the grand duke added to his large book col­lec­tion that was arranged in...

    In Jan­u­ary 1905 a wave of strikes broke out in St. Petersburg. On Jan­u­ary 9(O.S.)/22(N.S.) a peace­ful pro­ces­sion of work­ers led by a priest, Fa­ther Georgy Gapon, marched to­wards the Win­ter Palace from dif­fer­ent points in the city hop­ing to pre­sent re­quest for re­forms di­rectly to Em­peror Nicholas II. The Tsar, how­ever, was not in the capital. Gen­eral Ful­lon, St Pe­ters­burg Gov­er­nor, tried to stop the march. When a large group of work­ers reached Win­ter Palace Square, troops act­ing on di­rect or­ders from Guards Com­man­der Prince Vasilchikov opened fire upon the demon­stra­tors. More than 100 marchers were killed and sev­eral hun­dred were wounded. Al­though Grand Duke Vladimir claimed no di­rect re­spon­si­bil­ity about that tragedy, since he was also away from the city, his rep­u­ta­tion was tar­nished. The mas­sacre, known as Bloody Sun­day, was fol­lowed by a se­ries of strikes in other cities, peas­ant up­ris­ings in the coun­try, and mu­tinies in the...

    Belyakova, Zoia; The Romanov Legacy, The Palaces of St Petersburg, Studio, ISBN 0-670-86339-4
    Chavchavadze, David; The Grand Dukes, Atlantic, 1989, ISBN 0-938311-11-5
    King, Greg; The Court of the Last Tsar, Wiley, 2006, ISBN 978-0-471-72763-7
  4. Jul 20, 2018 · Russian Titles and Patronymics; Born in the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg, Russia on April 22, 1847, Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich was the third of the six sons and the fourth of the eight children of Alexander II, Emperor of All Russia and Marie of Hesse and by Rhine (Empress Maria Alexandrovna).

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