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  1. Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c. March 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and social activist. Born into slavery , Tubman escaped and subsequently made some 13 missions to rescue approximately 70 slaves, including family and friends, [2] using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad .

    • Minty, Moses
    • March 10, 1913 (aged 90–91), Auburn, New York, U.S.
  2. Oct 29, 2009 · Harriet Tubman was born around 1820 on a plantation in Dorchester County, Maryland. Her parents, Harriet (“Rit”) Green and Benjamin Ross, named her Araminta Ross and called her “Minty.” Rit...

    • 3 min
    • Early life and family
    • Marriage
    • Service
    • Legacy
    • Later life

    Tubmans exact birth date is unknown, but estimates place it between 1820 and 1822 in Dorchester County, Maryland. Born Araminta Ross, the daughter of Harriet Green and Benjamin Ross, Tubman had eight siblings. By age five, Tubmans owners rented her out to neighbors as a domestic servant. Early signs of her resistance to slavery and its abuses came ...

    Although slaves were not legally allowed to marry, Tubman entered a marital union with John Tubman, a free black man, in 1844. She took his name and dubbed herself Harriet.

    Tubman was never caught and never lost a passenger. She participated in other antislavery efforts, including supporting John Brown in his failed 1859 raid on the Harpers Ferry, Virginia arsenal.

    Through the Underground Railroad, Tubman learned the towns and transportation routes characterizing the Southinformation that made her important to Union military commanders during the Civil War. As a Union spy and scout, Tubman often transformed herself into an aging woman. She would wander the streets under Confederate control and learn from the ...

    After the war, Tubman raised funds to aid freedmen, joined Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in their quest for womens suffrage, cared for her aging parents, and worked with white writer Sarah Bradford on her autobiography as a potential source of income. She married a Union soldier Nelson Davis, also born into slavery, who was more than ...

  3. Tubman showed the same zeal and passion for the campaign to attain women's suffrage after the American Civil War as she had shown for the abolition of slavery. Harriet Tubman died in 1913 in Auburn, New York at the home she purchased from Secretary of State William Seward in 1859, where she established the Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged.

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