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  1. Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Henry_VI,_Holy_Roman_Emperor

    Henry VI (Heinrich VI) (November 1165 – 28 September 1197), a member of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was King of Germany (King of the Romans) from 1169 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1191 until his death. From 1194 he was also King of Sicily. He was the second son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and his consort Beatrix of Burgundy.

  2. Henry VI | Holy Roman emperor | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › Henry-VI-Holy-Roman-emperor

    Sep 24, 2020 · Henry VI, (born autumn 1165, Nijmegen, Neth.—died Sept. 28, 1197, Messina, Sicily), German king and Holy Roman emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty who increased his power and that of his dynasty by his acquisition of the kingdom of Sicily through his marriage to Constance I, posthumous daughter of the Sicilian king Roger II.

  3. Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor | Historipedia Official Wiki ...

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org › wiki › Henry_VI
    • Biography
    • Reception
    • Sources

    Early years

    Henry was born in autumn 1165 at the Valkhof pfalz of Nijmegen to Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and Beatrix of Burgundy. At the age of four, his father had him elected King of the Romans during the Hoftag in Bamberg at Pentecost 1169, and Henry was crowned on 15 August at Aachen Cathedral. He accompanied his father on his Italian campaign of 1174-76 against the Lombard League, whereby he was educated by Godfrey of Viterbo and associated with minnesingers like Friedrich von Hausen, Bligger von...

    Emperor's son

    Having returned to Germany in 1178, Henry supported his father against insurgent Duke Henry the Lion. He and his younger brother Frederick received the knightly accolade at Mainz in 1184. The emperor had already entered into negotiations with King William II of Sicily to betroth his son and heir with William's aunt Constance. As William's marriage had remained childless, she was his sole legitimate heir, and, after the latter's death in November 1189, Henry had the opportunity of adding the S...

    Imperial coronation

    While he sent an Imperial army to Italy, Henry initially stayed in Germany to settle the succession of Louis III, Landgrave of Thuringia, who had also died on the Third Crusade. He had planned to seize the Thuringian landgraviate as a reverted fief, but Louis' brother Hermann was able to reach his enfeoffment. The next year, the king followed his army across the Alps. In Lodi he negotiated with Eleanor of Aquitaine, widow of King Henry II of England, to break the engagement of her son King Ri...

    During his rule in Germany, Henry moved from one Kaiserpfalz residence to another or–to a lesser extent–stayed at Prince-bishop's sees in the tradititon of the medieval itinerary kingship. He concentrated on the Franconian core locations of his kingdom, while the Bavarian and Saxonlands were less subject to the central authority. His travel routes through Germany as well as his campaigns in Italy are documented by numerous deeds he issued year by year. The emperor strongly relied on the high-ranking clergy like the archbishops Philip of Cologne and Conrad of Mainz. Several contemporary accounts of his life given by ecclesiastical chroniclers like Godfrey of Viterbo or Peter of Eboli in his Liber ad honorem Augusti (on the emperor's conquest of Sicily) paint a bright picture of Henry's rule; while the annals by Otto of Sankt Blasien are considered more objective. In his Arnoldi Chronica Slavorum the chronicler Arnold of Lübeck concentrates on the dispute between the Hohenstaufen and...

    Alberic of Troisfontaines, Chronicon
    David Abulafia, Frederick II
    • November 1165 Nimwegen
    • 25 December 1194, Palermo
    • Palermo Cathedral
    • 28 September 1197(1197-09-28) (aged 31) Messina
  4. Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Henry_VI,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Early Years
    • Emperor's Son
    • Imperial Coronation
    • Capture of Richard The Lionheart
    • Conquest of Sicily
    • Universal Ruler
    • Hereditary Monarchy
    • Death

    Henry was born in autumn 1165 at the Valkhof pfalz of Nijmegen to Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and Beatrix of Burgundy. At the age of four, his father had him elected King of the Romans during the Hoftag in Bamberg at Pentecost 1169, and Henry was crowned on 15 August at Aachen Cathedral. He accompanied his father on his Italian campaign of 1174-76 against the Lombard League, whereby he was educated by Godfrey of Viterbo and associated with minnesingers like Friedrich von Hausen, Bligger von Steinach, and Bernger von Horheim. Henry was fluent in Latin and, according to the chronicler Alberic of Trois-Fontaines, was "distinguished by gifts of knowledge, wreathed in flowers of eloquence, and learned in canon and Roman law". He was a patron of poets and poetry, and he almost certainly composed the song Kaiser Heinrich, now among the Weingarten Song Manuscripts. According to his rank and with Imperial Eagle (Reichsadler), regalia, and a scroll, he is the first and foremost to be portray...

    Having returned to Germany in 1178, Henry supported his father against insurgent Duke Henry the Lion. He and his younger brother Frederick received the knightly accolade at Mainz in 1184. The emperor had already entered into negotiations with King William II of Sicily to betroth his son and heir with William's aunt Constance. As William's marriage had remained childless, she was his sole legitimate heir, and, after the latter's death in November 1189, Henry had the opportunity of adding the Sicilian crown to the imperial one. He and Constance were married on 27 January 1186 in Milan, and they were crowned King and Queen of Italy. In the Hohenstaufen conflict with Pope Urban III, Henry moved to the March of Tuscany, and with the aid of his liensman Markward von Annweiler devastated the adjacent territory of the Papal States. Back in Germany, he took the reins of the Empire from his father, who had died while on the Third Crusade in 1190. Henry tried to secure his rule in the Low Coun...

    While he sent an Imperial army to Italy, Henry initially stayed in Germany to settle the succession of Louis III, Landgrave of Thuringia, who had also died on the Third Crusade. He had planned to seize the Thuringian landgraviate as a reverted fief, but Louis' brother Hermann was able to reach his enfeoffment. The next year, the king followed his army across the Alps. In Lodi he negotiated with Eleanor of Aquitaine, widow of King Henry II of England, to break the engagement of her son King Richard with Alys, a daughter of late King Louis VII of France. He hoped to deteriorate English-French relations and to isolate Richard, who had offended him by backing Count Tancred in Sicily. Eleanor acted cleverly; she reached Henry's assurance that he would not interfere in her son's conflict with King Philip II of France, and she would also prevent the marriage of Henry's younger brother Conrad with Berengaria of Castileto confine the Hohenstaufen claims to power. Henry entered into further n...

    At this stage, Henry had a stroke of good fortune when the Babenberg duke Leopold V of Austria gave him his prominent prisoner, Richard the Lionheart, King of England, whom he had captured on his way back from the Third Crusade and arrested at Dürnstein Castle. On 28 March 1193, Richard was handed over to the emperor in Speyer and imprisoned at Trifels Castle, taking revenge for Richard's alliance with Tancred of Lecce. Ignoring his excommunication by Pope Celestine III for imprisoning a former crusader, he held the English King for a ransom of 150,000 silver marks and officially declared a dowry of Richard's niece, who was to marry Duke Leopold's son Frederick. The opposition princeshad to face the defeat of their mighty ally and to refrain from their plans to overthrow the Hohenstaufen dynasty. Backed by his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine, who successfully defended his interests against his rivaling brother John Lackland and his ally King Philip of France, King Richard procured his r...

    Meanwhile, the situation in Southern Italy had grown worse: After Henry's defeat at Naples, Tancred's brother-in-law Count Richard of Acerra had reconquered large parts of Apulia, and Tancred himself had reached the allowance of his claims by the pope. Henry was granted free passage in Northern Italy, having forged an alliance with the Lombard communes. In February 1194, Tancred of Lecce died, leaving as heir a young boy, William III, under the tutelage of his mother Sibylla of Acerra. In May Emperor Henry, based on King Richard's ransom, again set out for Italy. He reached Milan at Pentecost and occupied Naples in August. He met little resistance and on 20 November 1194 entered the Sicilian Palermo and was crowned king on 25 December. On the next day his wife Constance, who had stayed back in Iesi, gave birth to his only son and heir Frederick II, the future emperor and king of Sicily and Jerusalem. The young William and his mother Sibylla had fled to Caltabellotta Castle; he offic...

    At that point, Emperor Henry was the most powerful monarch in the Mediterranean and Europe, since the Sicilian kingdom added to his personal and Imperial revenues an income without parallel in Europe. However, his aims to integrate Sicily into the Empire as a second power base of the Hohenstaufen dynasty were not realised during his lifetime. The negotiations with Pope Celestine III to approve the unification (unio regni ad imperium) in return of another crusade reached a deadlock. On the other hand, his beliefs of a universal rule according to the translatio imperii concept collided with the existence of the Byzantine Empire, reflected in Henry's expansionist policies by forging alliances with King Leo I of Armenia and King Aimery of Cyprus. In 1195 Henry's envoys in Constantinople raised claims to former Italo-Norman possessions around Dyrrachium (Durrës), one of the most important naval bases on the eastern Adriatic coast, and pressed for a contribution to the planned crusade. Up...

    In summer 1195 Henry returned to Germany, in order to call for support to launch his crusade and to arrange his succession in the case of his death. However, he first again had to deal with the quarrels in the Wettin Margraviate of Meissen upon the death of Margrave Albert I. As Albert had tried to gain control over the adjacent Pleissnerland, an Imperial Hohenstaufen territory, Henry took the occasion to deny the inheritance claims of the margrave's younger brother Theodoric and seized the Meissen territory for himself. In October he reconciled with Archbishop Hartwig of Bremen at Gelnhausenand was able to obtain the support of numerous Saxon and Thuringian nobles for his crusade which was scheduled to begin on Christmas 1196. His next aim was to make the imperial crown hereditary. Henry tried to secure the Imperial election of his son Frderick II as King of the Romans, which however met with objections raised by Archbishop Adolf of Cologne. Spending the winter in Hagenau Castle, t...

    At the same time, the emperor stayed in Capua, where he had Count Richard of Acerra, held in custody by his ministerialis Dipold von Schweinspeunt, cruelly executed. He entered Sicily in March 1197 and applied himself to prepare his crusade in Messina. Soon after, the tyrannical power of the foreign King in Italy spurred a revolt, especially around Catania and southern Sicily, which his German soldiers led by Markward of Annweiler and Henry of Kalden suppressed mercilessly. In the midst of preparations Henry fell ill with chills while hunting near Fiumedinisi and on 28 September died, possibly of malaria, in Messina, although it is also widely believed that he was poisoned. His wife Constance had him buried at Messina, his mortal remains were transferred to Palermo Cathedral after Pope Innocent III had remitted Henry's excommunication in 1198. Various items were removed from Henry VI's grave in the mid nineteenth century, some of which made their way to the British Museum in London....

  5. Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Henry_VI,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Early Years
    • Emperor's Son
    • Imperial Coronation
    • Capture of Richard The Lionheart
    • Conquest of Sicily
    • Universal Ruler
    • Hereditary Monarchy
    • Death

    Henry was born in au­tumn 1165 at the Valkhof pfalz of Ni­jmegen to Em­peror Fred­er­ick Bar­barossa and Beat­rix of Bur­gundy. At the age of four, his fa­ther had him elected King of the Ro­mans dur­ing the Hof­tag in Bam­berg at Pen­te­cost 1169, and Henry was crowned on 15 Au­gust at Aachen Cathe­dral. He ac­com­pa­nied his fa­ther on his Ital­ian cam­paign of 1174-76 against the Lom­bard League, whereby he was ed­u­cated by God­frey of Viterbo and as­so­ci­ated with min­nesingers like Friedrich von Hausen, Blig­ger von Steinach, and Bernger von Horheim. Henry was flu­ent in Latin and, ac­cord­ing to the chron­i­cler Al­beric of Trois-Fontaines, was "dis­tin­guished by gifts of knowl­edge, wreathed in flow­ers of elo­quence, and learned in canon and Roman law". He was a pa­tron of poets and po­etry, and he al­most cer­tainly com­posed the song Kaiser Heinrich, now among the Wein­garten Song Man­u­scripts. Ac­cord­ing to his rank and with Im­pe­r­ial Eagle (Re­ich­sadler), re­gali...

    Hav­ing re­turned to Ger­many in 1178, Henry sup­ported his fa­ther against in­sur­gent Duke Henry the Lion. He and his younger brother Fred­er­ick re­ceived the knightly ac­co­lade at Mainz in 1184. The em­peror had al­ready en­tered into ne­go­ti­a­tions with King William II of Sicily to be­troth his son and heir with William's aunt Con­stance. As William's mar­riage had re­mained child­less, she was his sole le­git­i­mate heir, and, after the lat­ter's death in No­vem­ber 1189, Henry had the op­por­tu­nity of adding the Si­cil­ian crown to the im­pe­r­ial one. He and Con­stance were mar­ried on 27 Jan­u­ary 1186 in Milan. In the Ho­hen­staufen con­flict with Pope Urban III, Henry moved to the March of Tus­cany, and with the aid of his liens­man Mark­ward von An­nweiler dev­as­tated the ad­ja­cent ter­ri­tory of the Papal States. Back in Ger­many, he took the reins of the Em­pire from his fa­ther, who had died while on the Third Cru­sade in 1190. Henry tried to se­cure his rule in...

    While he sent an Im­pe­r­ial army to Italy, Henry ini­tially stayed in Ger­many to set­tle the suc­ces­sion of Louis III, Land­grave of Thuringia, who had also died on the Third Cru­sade. He had planned to seize the Thuringian land­gravi­ate as a re­verted fief, but Louis' brother Her­mann was able to reach his en­fe­off­ment. The next year, the king fol­lowed his army across the Alps. In Lodi he ne­go­ti­ated with Eleanor of Aquitaine, widow of King Henry II of Eng­land, to break the en­gage­ment of her son King Richard with Alys, a daugh­ter of late King Louis VII of France. He hoped to de­te­ri­o­rate Eng­lish-French re­la­tions and to iso­late Richard, who had of­fended him by back­ing Count Tan­cred in Sicily. Eleanor acted clev­erly; she reached Henry's as­sur­ance that he would not in­ter­fere in her son's con­flict with King Philip II of France, and she would also pre­vent the mar­riage of Henry's younger brother Con­rad with Beren­garia of Castileto con­fine the Ho­hen­stau...

    At this stage, Henry had a stroke of good for­tune when the Baben­berg duke Leopold V of Aus­tria gave him his promi­nent pris­oner, Richard the Li­on­heart, King of Eng­land, whom he had cap­tured on his way back from the Third Cru­sade and ar­rested at Dürn­stein Cas­tle. On 28 March 1193, Richard was handed over to the em­peror in Speyer and im­pris­oned at Trifels Cas­tle, tak­ing re­venge for Richard's al­liance with Tan­cred of Lecce. Ig­nor­ing his nearly ex­com­mu­ni­ca­tion by Pope Ce­les­tine III for im­pris­on­ing a for­mer cru­sader, he held the Eng­lish King for a ran­som of 150,000 sil­ver marks and of­fi­cially de­clared a dowry of Richard's niece Eleanor, who was to marry Duke Leopold's son Fred­er­ick. The op­po­si­tion princeshad to face the de­feat of their mighty ally and to re­frain from their plans to over­throw the Ho­hen­staufen dy­nasty. Backed by his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine, who suc­cess­fully de­fended his in­ter­ests against his ri­val­ing brother Joh...

    Mean­while, the sit­u­a­tion in South­ern Italy had grown worse: After Henry's de­feat at Naples, Tan­cred's brother-in-law Count Richard of Ac­erra had re­con­quered large parts of Apu­lia, and Tan­cred him­self had reached the al­lowance of his claims by the pope. Henry was granted free pas­sage in North­ern Italy, hav­ing forged an al­liance with the Lom­bard com­munes. In Feb­ru­ary 1194, Tan­cred of Lecce died, leav­ing as heir a young boy, William III, under the tute­lage of his mother Sibylla of Ac­erra. In May Em­peror Henry, based on King Richard's ran­som, again set out for Italy. He reached Milan at Pen­te­cost and oc­cu­pied Naples in Au­gust. He met lit­tle re­sis­tance and on 20 No­vem­ber 1194 en­tered the Si­cil­ian Palermo and was crowned king on 25 De­cem­ber. On the next day his wife Con­stance, who had stayed back in Iesi, gave birth to his only son and heir Fred­er­ick II, the fu­ture em­peror and king of Sicily and Jerusalem. The young William and his mother Si...

    At that point, Em­peror Henry was the most pow­er­ful monarch in the Mediter­ranean and Eu­rope, since the Si­cil­ian king­dom added to his per­sonal and Im­pe­r­ial rev­enues an in­come with­out par­al­lel in Eu­rope. How­ever, his aims to in­te­grate Sicily into the Em­pire as a sec­ond power base of the Ho­hen­staufen dy­nasty were not re­alised dur­ing his life­time. The ne­go­ti­a­tions with Pope Ce­les­tine III to ap­prove the uni­fi­ca­tion (unio regni ad imperium) in re­turn of an­other cru­sade reached a dead­lock. On the other hand, his be­liefs of a uni­ver­sal rule ac­cord­ing to the trans­la­tio im­perii con­cept col­lided with the ex­is­tence of the Byzan­tine Em­pire, re­flected in Henry's ex­pan­sion­ist poli­cies by forg­ing al­liances with King Leo I of Ar­me­nia and King Aimery of Cyprus. In 1195 Henry's en­voys in Con­stan­tino­ple raised claims to for­mer Italo-Nor­man pos­ses­sions around Dyrrachium (Durrës), one of the most im­por­tant naval bases on the east­...

    In sum­mer 1195 Henry re­turned to Ger­many, in order to call for sup­port to launch his cru­sade and to arrange his suc­ces­sion in the case of his death. How­ever, he first again had to deal with the quar­rels in the Wet­tin Mar­gravi­ate of Meis­sen upon the death of Mar­grave Al­bert I. As Al­bert had tried to gain con­trol over the ad­ja­cent Pleiss­ner­land, an Im­pe­r­ial Ho­hen­staufen ter­ri­tory, Henry took the oc­ca­sion to deny the in­her­i­tance claims of the mar­grave's younger brother Theodoric and seized the Meis­sen ter­ri­tory for him­self. In Oc­to­ber he rec­on­ciled with Arch­bishop Hartwig of Bre­men at Gelnhausenand was able to ob­tain the sup­port of nu­mer­ous Saxon and Thuringian no­bles for his cru­sade which was sched­uled to begin on Christ­mas 1196. His next aim was to make the im­pe­r­ial crown hered­i­tary. Henry tried to se­cure the Im­pe­r­ial elec­tion of his son Fred­er­ick II as King of the Ro­mans, which how­ever met with ob­jec­tions raised by...

    At the same time, the em­peror stayed in Capua, where he had Count Richard of Ac­erra, held in cus­tody by his min­is­te­ri­alis Dipold von Schwein­spe­unt, cru­elly ex­e­cuted. He en­tered Sicily in March 1197 and ap­plied him­self to pre­pare his cru­sade in Messina. Soon after, the tyran­ni­cal power of the for­eign King in Italy spurred a re­volt, es­pe­cially around Cata­nia and south­ern Sicily, which his Ger­man sol­diers led by Mark­ward of An­nweiler and Henry of Kalden sup­pressed mer­ci­lessly. The rebels even sought to make Count Jor­dan of Bovino king in Henry's place. Even Queen Con­stance, pro­voked by the ne­glect of Henry and pity­ing her coun­try­men, joined the re­volts against him and be­sieged him in a cas­tle, forc­ing him into a treaty. In the midst of prepa­ra­tions Henry fell ill with chills while hunt­ing near Fi­ume­din­isi and on 28 Sep­tem­ber died, pos­si­bly of malaria, in Messina, al­though it is also widely be­lieved that he was poisoned. His wife Co...

  6. Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI - 1191-1197

    www.holyromanempireassociation.com › holy-roman-emperor

    Henry VI (Heinrich VI) (November 1165 – 28 September 1197), a member of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was King of Germany (King of the Romans) from 1190 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1191 until his death. From 1194 he was also King of Sicily. He was the second son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa and his consort Beatrix of Burgundy.

  7. Henry VI, The King Of Germany, And Holy Roman Emperor - About ...

    about-history.com › henry-vi-the-king-of-germany

    Henry VI (German Heinrich VI) was the King of Germany from 1169, the Holy Roman Emperor from 1191 and the King of Sicily since 1194. He was the son of Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa and Beatrice I of Burgundy. As a child, on August 15, 1169, he was elected to be the German king (heir to the imperial throne).

  8. Henry VI | Infoplease

    www.infoplease.com › encyclopedia › history

    Henry VI Henry VI, 1165–97, Holy Roman emperor (1191–97) and German king (1190–97), son and successor of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I (Frederick Barbarossa). He was crowned German king at Aachen in 1169 and king of Italy at Milan in 1186 after his marriage to Constance, heiress presumptive to the throne of Sicily.

  9. Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org › wiki › Henry_VI,_Holy_Roman

    English: Henry VI was King (since 1190) and Emperor (1191-1197) of the Holy Roman Empire.

  10. Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor - geni family tree

    www.geni.com › people › Henry-VI-Holy-Roman-Emperor

    Genealogy profile for Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor Henry Enrique VI (c.1165 - 1197) - Genealogy Genealogy for Henry Enrique VI (c.1165 - 1197) family tree on Geni, with over 200 million profiles of ancestors and living relatives.