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  1. Henry the Young King - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Henry_the_Young_King

    Henry the Young King (28 February 1155 – 11 June 1183) was the eldest surviving son of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine.Beginning in 1170, he was titular King of England, Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine.

  2. Henry The Young King | king designate of England | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › biography › Henry-the-Young-King

    Jun 07, 2021 · Henry The Young King, second son of King Henry II of England by Eleanor of Aquitaine; he was regarded, after the death of his elder brother, William, in 1156, as his father’s successor in England, Normandy, and Anjou. In 1158 Henry, only three years of age, was betrothed to Margaret, daughter of

  3. Henry the Young King - geni family tree

    www.geni.com › people › Henry-the-Young-King

    Feb 28, 2018 · About Henry the Young King. Henry, known as the Young King (28 February 1155 – 11 June 1183) was the second of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was junior King of England, Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine.

    • Henry II of England, Eleanor of Aquitaine
    • Bermandsey Palace, London, Middlesex, England
    • March 28, 1155
  4. Who was Henry, the Young King? - English Monarchs

    www.englishmonarchs.co.uk › plantagenet_33

    1155 - 1183. Henry Plantagenet, the Young King was born on 28 February 1155 and was the eldest surviving son of King Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine.An elder brother, William, Count of Poitiers, who should have been his father's heir, had been born in Normandy, over a year before Henry on 17 August 1153, but died of a seizure at Wallingford Castle in April 1156 and was buried in Reading ...

  5. Death in Youth: Henry the Young King - Angevin World

    www.angevinworld.com › blog › youth-and-death-henry

    Henry the Young King was born on the 28th of February 1155. At the time of his birth, he was the second son, so he was not expected to become king. However, his elder brother, William, passed away in 1156 at the age of three, making Henry the eldest son and heir of Henry II. Little Henry was specially groomed for kingship.

  6. Henry the Young King | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Henry_the_Young_King
    • Early Life
    • Tournament Hero and Celebrity
    • Political Career
    • Death and Burial
    • Appearance and Character
    • Fictional Portrayals
    • References

    Little is known of the young prince Henry before the events associated with his marriage and coronation. His mother's children by her first marriage to Louis VII of France were Marie of France, Countess of Champagne and Alix of France, Countess Blois. He had one older brother, William IX, Count of Poitiers (d. 1156), and his younger siblings included Matilda, Duchess of Saxony; Richard I of England; Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany; Eleanor, Queen of Castile; Joan, Queen of Sicily; and John of England. In June 1170, the fifteen-year-old Henry was crowned king during his father's lifetime, something originally practised by the French Capetian dynasty and adopted by the English kings Stephen and Henry II. A Latin poem by a court official written to commemorate the coronation hints at the charisma of this young prince. There he is described as a charming youth of striking beauty, tall but well proportioned, broad-shouldered with a long and elegant neck, pale and freckled skin, bright and...

    Henry did not appear to have been very interested in the day-to-day business of government, which distinguished him from his father and younger brothers. His father, however, is reputed to have failed to delegate authority to his son, retaining power in England. The majority opinion amongst historians is that of W. L. Warren(1973): "The Young Henry was the only one of his family who was popular in his own day. It was true that he was also the only one who gave no evidence of political sagacity, military skill, or even ordinary intelligence...", and elaborated in a later book, "He was gracious, benign, affable, courteous, the soul of liberality and generosity. Unfortunately he was also shallow, vain, careless, high-hoped, incompetent, improvident, and irresponsible." The Young King's contemporary reputation, however, was by no means so negative. This had much to do with his place in the enthusiastic tournament culture of his own day. We can see this from his appearances in the Histor...

    The young Henry played an important part in the politics of his father's reign. On 2 November 1160, he was betrothed to Margaret of France, daughter of King Louis VII of France and his second wife, Constance of Castile, when he was 5 years of age and she was at least 2. The marriage was an attempt to finally settle the struggle between the Counts of Anjou and the French Kings over possession of the frontier district of the Norman Vexin, which Louis VII acquired from Henry's grandfather, Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, around 1144. By the terms of the settlement, Margaret would bring the castles of the Norman Vexin to her new husband. However, the marriage was pushed through by Henry II when Young Henry and Margaret were small children, so that he could seize the castles. A bitter border war followed between the kings. They were formally married on 27 August 1172 at Winchester Cathedral, when Henry was crowned king of England a second time, this time together with Margaret, by...

    Henry the Young King died in the summer of 1183, during the course of a campaign in the Limousin against his father and his brother Richard. He had just completed a pillage of local monasteries to raise money to pay his mercenaries. He contracted dysentery at the beginning of June. Weakening fast, he was taken to Martel, near Limoges. It was clear to his household that he was dying on 7 June when he was confessed and received the last rites. As a token of his penitence for his war against his father he prostrated himself naked on the floor before a crucifix. He made a testament and since he had taken a crusader's vow, he gave his cloak to his friend William Marshal with the plea that he should take the cloak (presumably with the crusader's cross stitched to it) to the Holy Sepulchrein Jerusalem. On his deathbed, he reportedly asked to be reconciled to his father, but King Henry, fearing a trick, refused to see him. He died on 11 June, clasping a ring his father had sent instead as a...

    The Topography of Ireland by Gerald of Walessays that Henry and Richard were "both tall in stature, rather above the middle size, and of commanding aspect. In courage and magnanimity they were nearly equal; but in the character of their virtues there was great disparity... [Henry] was admirable for gentleness and liberality...had a commendable suavity... commended for his easy temper... remarkable for his clemency... the vile and undeserving found their refuge in [Henry]... was the shield of bad men... was bent on martial sports... bestowed his favours on foreigners... [Henry's] ambition magnanimously compassed the world."

    Henry was portrayed by Riggs O'Hara in the 1964 film, Becket. He was also portrayed by Alan Cox (as a young boy), Dominic Savage (as a teenager), and Kevin McNally (as an adult) in the 1978 BBC TV series The Devil's Crown, which dramatised the reigns of his father and brothers. Henry is an important character in Sharon Kay Penman's novels, Time and Chance and The Devil's Brood. Henry is an important secondary character in Elizabeth Chadwick's novel, The Greatest Knight. Although he does not personally appear, Henry's death precipitates the events of James Goldman's play, The Lion in Winter, which features Henry's parents and three younger brothers. Henry was also portrayed by Andrea Zirio in the 2013 film, Richard The Lionheart.

    W. L. Warren, Henry II (London, 1973) ISBN 0-520-03494-5
    O. H. Moore, The Young King Henry Plantagenet, 1155–83, in History, Literature, and Tradition(Columbus OH, 1925)
    G. Duby, William Marshal: the Flower of Chivalrytrans. R. Howard (London, 1986)
    D. Crouch, William Marshal: Knighthood, War and Chivalry, 1147–1219(2nd edn, London, 2002)
  7. Henry the Young King — Wikipedia Republished // WIKI 2

    wiki2.org › en › Henry_the_Young_King
    • Early Life
    • Tournament Hero and Celebrity
    • Political Career
    • Death and Burial
    • Appearance and Character
    • Cultural Depictions
    • Bibliography

    Lit­tle is known of the young Prince Henry be­fore the events as­so­ci­ated with his mar­riage and coro­na­tion. His mother's chil­dren by her first mar­riage to Louis VII of France were Marie of France, Count­ess of Cham­pagne and Alix of France. He had one elder brother, William IX, Count of Poitiers (d. 1156), and his younger sib­lings in­cluded Matilda; Richard; Ge­of­frey; Eleanor; Joan; and John. In June 1170, the fif­teen-year-old Henry was crowned king dur­ing his fa­ther's life­time, some­thing orig­i­nally prac­tised by the French Capet­ian dy­nasty and adopted by the Eng­lish kings Stephen and Henry II. The phys­i­cal ap­pear­ance of Henry at his coro­na­tion in 1170 is given in a con­tem­po­rary court poem writ­ten in Latin, where the fif­teen-year-old prince is de­scribed as being very hand­some, "tall but well pro­por­tioned, broad-shoul­dered with a long and el­e­gant neck, pale and freck­led skin, bright and wide blue eyes, and a thick mop of the red­dish-gold hair"....

    Henry did not ap­pear to have been very in­ter­ested in the day-to-day busi­ness of gov­ern­ment, which dis­tin­guished him from his fa­ther and younger broth­ers. His fa­ther, how­ever, is re­puted to have failed to del­e­gate au­thor­ity to his son, re­tain­ing power in Eng­land. The ma­jor­ity opin­ion amongst his­to­ri­ans is that of W. L. War­ren: "The Young Henry was the only mem­ber of the fam­ily who was pop­u­lar in his own day....​also the only one who gave no ev­i­dence of po­lit­i­cal sagac­ity, mil­i­tary skill, or even or­di­nary intelligence...",and elab­o­rated in a later book, "He was gra­cious, be­nign, af­fa­ble, cour­te­ous, the soul of lib­er­al­ity and gen­eros­ity. Un­for­tu­nately he was also shal­low, vain, care­less, empty-headed, in­com­pe­tent, im­prov­i­dent, and irresponsible." The Young King's con­tem­po­rary rep­u­ta­tion, how­ever, was pos­i­tive. Likely this was due to the en­thu­si­as­tic tour­na­ment cul­ture of his time. In the His­tory of Willia...

    The young Henry played an im­por­tant part in the pol­i­tics of his fa­ther's reign. On 2 No­vem­ber 1160, he was be­trothed to Mar­garet of France, daugh­ter of King Louis VII of France and his sec­ond wife, Con­stance of Castile, when he was 5 years of age and she was at least 2. The mar­riage was an at­tempt to fi­nally set­tle the strug­gle be­tween the counts of Anjou and the French kings over pos­ses­sion of the fron­tier dis­trict of the Nor­man Vexin, which Louis VII had ac­quired from Henry's grand­fa­ther, Ge­of­frey Plan­ta­genet, Count of Anjou, in around 1144. By the terms of the set­tle­ment, Mar­garet would bring the cas­tles of the Nor­man Vexin to her new hus­band. How­ever, the mar­riage was pushed through by Henry II when Young Henry and Mar­garet were small chil­dren so that he could seize the cas­tles. A bit­ter bor­der war fol­lowed be­tween the kings. Henry II had toyed with the idea of hav­ing Young Henry crowned king as early as 1162 and even pro­cured a pap...

    Henry the Young King died, aged 28, in the sum­mer of 1183, dur­ing the course of a cam­paign in Lim­ou­sin against his fa­ther and his brother Richard the Li­on­heart. He had just fin­ished pil­lag­ing local monas­ter­ies to raise money to pay his mer­ce­nar­ies. He con­tracted dysen­tery at the be­gin­ning of June. Weak­en­ing fast, he was taken to Mar­tel, near Limo­ges. It was clear to his house­hold that he was dying on 7 June, when he was con­fessed and re­ceived the last rites. As a token of his pen­i­tence for his war against his fa­ther, he pros­trated him­self naked on the floor be­fore a cru­ci­fix. He made a tes­ta­ment and, since he had taken a cru­sader's vow, he gave his cloak to his friend William Mar­shal, with the plea that he should take the cloak (pre­sum­ably with the cru­sader's cross stitched to it) to the Holy Sepul­chrein Jerusalem. On his deathbed, he re­port­edly asked to be rec­on­ciled to his fa­ther, but King Henry, fear­ing a trick, re­fused to see him...

    Henry and Richard were "both tall in stature, rather above the mid­dle size, and of com­mand­ing as­pect. In courage and mag­na­nim­ity they were nearly equal; but in the char­ac­ter of their virtues there was great dis­par­ity... [Henry] was ad­mirable for gen­tle­ness and lib­er­al­ity... had a com­mend­able suavity... com­mended for his easy tem­per... re­mark­able for his clemency... the vile and un­de­serv­ing found their refuge in [Henry]... was the shield of bad men... was bent on mar­tial sports... be­stowed his favours on for­eign­ers... [Henry's] am­bi­tion mag­nan­i­mously com­passed the world." An­other de­scrip­tion says "He was tall in stature and dis­tin­guished in ap­pear­ance; his face ex­pressed mer­ri­ment and ma­ture judg­ment in good mea­sure; fair among the chil­dren of men, he was cour­te­ous and cheer­ful. Gra­cious to all, he was loved by all; ami­able to all, he was in­ca­pable of mak­ing an enemy. He was match­less in war­fare, and as he out­stripped them...

    Henry was portrayed by Riggs O'Hara in the 1964 film Becket.
    He was also portrayed by Alan Cox (as a young boy), Dominic Savage (as a teenager) and Kevin McNally (as an adult) in the 1978 BBC TV series The Devil's Crown, which dramatised the reigns of his fa...
    W. L. Warren, Henry II (London, 1973) ISBN 0-520-03494-5
    O. H. Moore, The Young King Henry Plantagenet, 1155–83, in History, Literature, and Tradition(Columbus OH, 1925)
    G. Duby, William Marshal: the Flower of Chivalrytrans. R. Howard (London, 1986)
  8. Henry the Young King Blog

    henrytheyoungking.blogspot.com

    Apr 06, 2021 · Henry the Young King was the only king of England crowned in his father’s lifetime. In this his father, Henry II followed the continental tradition. The Capetian rulers had their heirs crowned during their reign in order to avoid even a momentary interregnum and disorder. Louis VI, for instance, still active monarch, had his son, also Louis ...

  9. Henry the Young King: Top Star in the Tournament World

    www.medievalists.net › 2021 › 02

    Coronation of Henry the Young King, c. 1220-1240, The Becket Leaves, France. Wikimedia Commons. As Henry and William travelled the tournament world far and wide, their adventures and exploits became stuff of legends, later described in vivid detail by William’s first biographer, the author of The History of William Marshal.

  10. William Marshal & Henry the Young King: The Real King Arthur ...

    www.historyextra.com › period › medieval

    Feb 26, 2021 · After Henry the Young King’s coronation, Marshal was appointed as the boy’s tutor-in-arms – a promotion that was probably engineered by Queen Eleanor so that she could maintain a degree of contact with, and influence over, her eldest son. William soon became Young Henry’s leading retainer and close confidant.

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