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  1. Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) was a Roman poet, satirist, and critic. Born in Venusia in southeast Italy in 65 BCE to an Italian freedman and landowner, he was sent to Rome for schooling and was later in Athens studying philosophy when Caesar was assassinated. Horace joined Brutus’s army and…

  2. Roman lyric poet, satirist, and critic Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) was born in Apulia, Italy, in 65 BC. His father, an Italian freedman, sent Horace to the finest school in Rome—the grammaticus Orbilius. He then studied literature and philosophy in Athens. In 44 BC, he became a staff officer in Brutus’s army.

  3. The whole poem absolves Horace of any possible charge of failing, because of his current Augustan connections, to maintain loyalty to his republican friends. Horace’s intellectual formation had to a large extent been completed before the Augustan regime began; yet he came to admire Augustus sincerely and deeply, owing him many practical benefits. But, above all, he deeply admired him for ending a prolonged, nightmarish epoch of civil wars.

  4. Oct 24, 2020 · Updated on October 24, 2020. Horace was the major lyric Latin poet of the era of the Roman Emperor Augustus (Octavian). He is famed for his Odes as well as his caustic satires, and his book on writing, the Ars Poetica. His life and career were owed to Augustus, who was close to his patron, Maecenas. From this lofty, if tenuous, position, Horace became the voice of the new Roman Empire.

  5. Horace You traverse the world in search of happiness, which is within the reach of every man. A contented mind confers it on all. Horace Whoever cultivates the golden mean avoids both the poverty of a hovel and the envy of a palace. Horace You must avoid sloth, that wicked siren. Horace A word, once sent abroad, flies irrevocably. Horace

  6. carpe diem, (Latin: “pluck the day” or “seize the day”) phrase used by the Roman poet Horace to express the idea that one should enjoy life while one can. Carpe diem is part of Horace’s injunction “carpe diem quam minimum credula postero,” which appears in his Odes (I.11), published in 23 bce. It can be translated literally as “pluck the day, trusting as little as possible in the next one.”.

  7. Horace approaches poetry from a practical standpoint—as a craft, or ars—rather than the theoretical approach of his predecessors, Aristotle and the philosopher Plato. He also holds the poet in high regard, as opposed, for instance, to Plato, who distrusts mimesis and who has philosopher Socrates say in Book 10 of the Republic that he would banish poets from the ideal state.

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