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  1. Tvrtko I of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tvrtko_I_of_Bosnia

    A member of the House of Kotromanić, he succeeded his uncle Stephen II as Ban of Bosnia in 1353. As he was a minor at the time, Tvrtko's father, Vladislav, briefly ruled as regent, followed by Tvrtko's mother, Jelena.

  2. House of Kotromanić

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/1578169

    🐇🐇🐇 Royal house surname = House of Kotromanić estate = of Serbs, Bosnia, Littoral, the Lower Krajs, the Western Sides, Hum, Usora, Podrinje, Rascia . coat of arms = country = Bosnia parent house = none titles = Ban, King founder = Prijezda I final… 📐 📓 📒 📝

  3. Template:Kotromanić dynasty - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:House_of_Kotromanić

    |state=expanded: {{Kotromanić dynasty|state=expanded}} to show the template expanded, i.e., fully visible |state=autocollapse : {{Kotromanić dynasty|state=autocollapse}} shows the template collapsed to the title bar if there is a {{ navbar }} , a {{ sidebar }} , or some other table on the page with the collapsible attribute

  4. Maria of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_of_Bosnia

    Maria's parentage and connection to the House of Kotromanić is uncertain. King Louis I of Hungary, husband of Ban Stephen II of Bosnia's daughter Elizabeth, apparently mentions her in a charter as Stephen's II sister.

  5. Trpimirović dynasty - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Trpimirović

    Dukes and Kings of Croatia. The Trpimirović dynasty was a ruling dynasty of Croatia from the 9th to the 11th century. The ruling estate (Latin: terra regalis) of the Trpimirović dynasty was located in the area between Trogir and Split (today Kaštela, Solin area and Klis from where they ruled), and Split and Omiš and later in other parts of the land.

  6. House of Kosača

    enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/4138872

    Wikipedia. House of Mrnjavčević — Country Serbian Empire Titles Knez, King … Wikipedia. House of Drašković — Drašković Coat of Arms above the entrance to … Wikipedia. House of Nikolić — The House of Nikolić was a medieval Serbian noble family from Hum (Herzegovina). The family s main estate was Popovo Polje.

  7. Prijezda I, Ban of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prijezda_I

    Prijezda I (pronounced (1211–1287) was a Bosnian Ban as a vassal of the Hungarian Kingdom, reigning 1250–1287.He was probably the founder of the House of Kotromanić

  8. Category:Tvrtko I of Bosnia - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Tvrtko_I_of...

    May 03, 2019 · Upload media Wikipedia Date of birth: c. 5 August 1338 (statement with Gregorian date earlier than 1584) Srebrenik: Date of death: 14 March 1391 (statement with Gregorian date earlier than 1584)

  9. Category:Elizabeth of Bosnia - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Elizabeth_of...

    Jun 14, 2020 · Wikipedia: Name in native language: Elizabeta Kotromanić: Date of birth: 1340, 1339 (statement with Gregorian date earlier than 1584) Date of death: January 1387 (statement with Gregorian date earlier than 1584) Novigrad Castle: Cause of death

  10. Catherine of Bosnia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katarina_Kosača_Kotromanić

    Upon arrival, she rented a house for herself and her entourage, consisting of Bosnian nobility who had followed her. On 1 October 1469, she moved to the rione of Pigna, into a house near San Marco Evangelista al Campidoglio. Pope Sixtus IV gave her considerable property adjacent to the Tiber. The Queen was a prominent figure in Roman society.