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  1. Ivan I Daniilovich Kalita (Russian: Ива́н I Даниилович Калита; 1 November 1288 – 31 March 1340 or 1341) was Grand Duke of Moscow from 1325 and Vladimir from 1332.

    Ivan I of Moscow - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_I_of_Moscow
  2. Ivan I of Moscow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_I_of_Moscow

    Ivan I Daniilovich Kalita (Russian: Ива́н I Даниилович Калита; 1 November 1288 – 31 March 1340 or 1341) was Grand Duke of Moscow from 1325 and Vladimir from 1332.

  3. Ivan I of Moscow | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org/wiki/Ivan_I_of_Moscow

    Ivan I Daniilovich Kalita (Ива́н I Дании́лович Калита́ in Russian; 1288 – 31 March 1340) was Prince of Moscow from 1325 and Grand Prince of Vladimir from 1328.

    • c. 1288 Moscow, Grand Duchy of Moscow
    • Eastern Orthodox
    • Yuri I
    • Elena Aleksandra
  4. Ivan I and the Rise of Moscow | Western Civilization

    courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-hccc-worldhistory/...
    • Ivan I
    • Moscow’s Rise
    • Russian Orthodox Church and The Center of Moscow

    Ivan I (also known as Ivan Kalita) was born around 1288 to the Prince of Moscow, Daniil Aleksandrovich. He was born during a time of devastation and upheaval in Rus’. Kiev had been overtaken by the invading Mongol forces in 1240, and most of the Rus’ principalities had been absorbed into the Golden Horde of the Mongol Empire by the time Ivan was born. He ascended to the seat of Prince of Moscow after the death of his father, and then the death of his older brother Yury. Ivan I stepped into a role that had already been expanded by his predecessors. Both his older brother and his father had captured nearby lands, including Kolomna and Mozhaisk. Yury had also made a successful alliance with the Mongol leader Uzbeg Khan and married his sister, securing more power and advantages within the hierarchy of the Golden Horde. Ivan I continued the family tradition and petitioned the leaders of the Golden Horde to gain the seat of Grand Prince of Vladimir. His other three rivals, all princes of...

    During this time of upheaval, the tiny outpost of Moscow had multiple advantages that repositioned this town and set it up for future prosperity under Ivan I. Three major contributing factors helped Ivan I relocate power to this area: 1. It was situated in between other major principalities on the east and west so it was often protected from the more devastating invasions. 2. This relative safety, compared to Tver and Ryazan, for example, started to bring in tax-paying citizens who wanted a safe place to build a home and earn a livelihood. 3. Finally, Moscow was set up perfectly along the trade route from Novgorod to the Volga River, giving it an economic advantage from the start. Ivan I also spurred on the growth of Moscow by actively recruiting people to move to the region. In addition, he bought the freedom of people who had been captured by the extensive Mongol raids. These recruits further bolstered the population of Moscow. Finally, he focused his attention on establishing pea...

    Ivan I committed some of Moscow’s new wealth to building a splendid city center and creating an iconic religious setting. He built stone churches in the center of Moscow with his newly gained wealth. Ivan I also tempted one of the most important religious leaders in Rus’, the Orthodox Metropolitan Peter, to the city of Moscow. Before the rule of the Golden Horde the original Russian Orthodox Church was based in Kiev. After years of devastation, Metropolitan Peter transferred the seat of power to Moscow where a new Renaissance of culture was blossoming. This perfectly timed transformation of Moscow coincided with the decades of devastation in Kiev, effectively transferring power to the north once again. One of the most lasting accomplishments of Ivan I was to petition the Khan based in Sarai to designate his son, who would become Simeon the Proud, as the heir to the title of Grand Prince of Vladimir. This agreement a line of succession that meant the ruling head of Moscow would almos...

  5. 9.5: Ivan I and the Rise of Moscow - Humanities Libertexts

    human.libretexts.org/Courses/Lumen_Learning/Book...

    Sep 27, 2020 · Ivan I (also known as Ivan Kalita) was born around 1288 to the Prince of Moscow, Daniil Aleksandrovich. He was born during a time of devastation and upheaval in Rus’. Kiev had been overtaken by the invading Mongol forces in 1240, and most of the Rus’ principalities had been absorbed into the Golden Horde of the Mongol Empire by the time Ivan was born.

    • Ivan the Great - History of Russia in 100 Minutes (Part 6 of 36)
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    • Ivan the Terrible Biography
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    • Vodka rage v Ivan the Terrible: Drunk man mauls iconic Russian painting in Moscow museum
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    • Ivan Safronov: Dozens arrested in Moscow protest against ex-journalist's treason charges
      youtube.com
  6. Ivan I of Moscow. Who is who — Moscow Travel Guide

    moscow.touristgems.com/people/3151-ivan-i-of-moscow

    Ivan was the son of Prince of Moscow Daniil Aleksandrovich. After the death of his elder brother Yuri III, Ivan inherited the Principality of Moscow. Ivan participated in the struggle to get the title of Grand Prince of Vladimir which could be obtained with the approval of a khan of the Golden Horde.

  7. prince Ivan I "Kalita" Daniilovich (1288 - 1340) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Ivan-I-grand-prince-of...

    Ivan I Danilovich Kalita (Ива́н I Дани́лович Калита́ in Russian) (1288 – March 31, 1340, Moscow), Prince of Moscow (from 1325), Grand Prince of Vladimir (from 1328), son of Daniil Aleksandrovich (Prince of Moscow).

  8. Prominent Russians: Ivan I Kalita - Russiapedia

    russiapedia.rt.com/prominent-russians/the-r...

    Ivan Kalita was the second son of Prince Daniil of Moscow, who is known for developing and increasing the political influence of the Moscow principality. In 1296 – 1297, when Ivan was approximately 8 years old, Prince Daniil put him in charge of Novgorod.

  9. Ivan the Terrible | Biography, Achievements, & Facts | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Ivan-the-Terrible

    Ivan the Terrible, Russian Ivan Grozny, Russian in full Ivan Vasilyevich, also called Ivan IV, (born August 25, 1530, Kolomenskoye, near Moscow [Russia]—died March 18, 1584, Moscow), grand prince of Moscow (1533–84) and the first to be proclaimed tsar of Russia (from 1547).

  10. Moscow and Ivan the Great Flashcards | Quizlet

    quizlet.com/16614110/moscow-and-ivan-the-great...

    Ivan I was a tax collector fo the Mongols. He was nicknamed Ivan Moneybags. The Russian Orthodox church made Moscow his residence. The church became an ally of Moscow's princes. By the 1400's Moscow became the strongest of the Russian states under the Mongols.

  11. Ivan II of Moscow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_II_of_Moscow

    Ivan II Ivanovich the Fair (Russian: Иван II Иванович Красный) (30 March 1326 – 13 November 1359) was the Grand Prince of Moscow and Grand Prince of Vladimir in 1353. Until that date, he had ruled the towns of Ruza and Zvenigorod .