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  1. Scroll. her Mission: One Race. Jane Elliott, internationally known teacher, lecturer, diversity trainer, and recipient of the National Mental Health Association Award for Excellence in Education, exposes prejudice and bigotry for what it is, an irrational class system based upon purely arbitrary factors. And if you think this does not apply to ...

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Jane_ElliottJane Elliott - Wikipedia

    Jane Elliott ( née Jennison; [2] [3] born November 30, 1933) is an American diversity educator.

  3. www.imdb.com › name › nm0254243Jane Elliot - IMDb

    Jane Elliot (I) Actress | Producer Jane Elliot was born Janury 17, 1947 in New York City. Despite never being academically taught acting (she took voice and acting classes instead), Elliott got an agent at age 17 who sent her auditioning for the most diverse roles which eventually jump-started her career.

    • New York City, New York, USA
    • Actress | Producer
    • 1947-1-17
    • Actress, Producer
  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Jane_ElliotJane Elliot - Wikipedia

    Jane Elliot (born January 17, 1947) is an American actress, best known for her role as Tracy Quartermaine in the ABC daytime soap opera, General Hospital . Contents 1 Life and career 2 Filmography 3 References 4 External links Life and career [ edit] Elliot was born in New York City.

    Year
    Title
    Role
    Notes
    1965
    Linda Skerba
    Series regular
    1965
    Miss Marks
    Episode: "Night of the Witch"
    1967
    Jilly
    Episode: "The Pink Gumdrop"
    1968
    Jo Ann Storm
    Episode: "Kingdom of the Blind"
    • Jane Elliott’s Experiment
    • Eye Color
    • The Results of The Experiment
    • Minimal Groups Today

    Jane Elliott, a teacher and anti-racism activist, performed a direct experiment with the students in her classroom. She told them that people with brown eyes were better than people with blue eyes.She also made the brown-eyed students put construction paper armbands on the blue-eyed students.

    With a couple of basic and arbitrary examples, Elliott made the case that brown-eyed people were better. The students were surprised, but they didn’t argue. This way, she successfully created two distinct groups in her classroom: 1. Brown-eyed people. There were more brown-eyed students in the room. They felt superior and had the support of the aut...

    The arbitrary division among the students intensified over the course of the experiment, so much so that it actually ended in physical violence. Children often fight, argue, and sometimes hit each other, but this time they were motivated by eye color.The second day, Elliott reversed the groups. She told the students that the brown-eyed children wer...

    This paradigm helps understand the current problems related to discrimination. Today, increased migration means more opportunities for people from different backgrounds to interact with each other, which is often a source of conflict. The people and cultures already present in a place often feel threatened by new immigrants. Their response is to cr...

  5. Jul 15, 2020 · Published July 15, 2020 Updated July 24, 2020 The day after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, the schoolteacher Jane Elliott scrapped her lesson plan — teaching her...

  6. The Anatomy of Prejudice. A three-hour presentation during which Ms. Jane Elliott, the adaptor of the Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes Exercise in teaching about the anatomy of prejudice and the subject of the Peabody Award-winning film, "The Eye of the Storm," introduces and discusses that film and explores with the audience the problems of racism, sexism, ageism, homophobia, and ethnocentrism and the ...

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