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  1. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Wolfgang_von_Goethe

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (/ ˈ ɡ ɜː t ə /, also US: / ˈ ɡ ɜːr t ə, ˈ ɡ eɪ t ə,-t i / GURT-ə, GAYT-ə, -⁠ee; German: [ˈjoːhan ˈvɔlfɡaŋ fɔn ˈɡøːtə] ; 28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German writer and statesman.

    • German
    • Poet, novelist, playwright, natural philosopher, diplomat, civil servant
    • 5 (4 died young), Julius August Walter [de] (1789–1830)
    • Christiane Vulpius, (m. 1806; died 1816)
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  2. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe | Biography, Works, & Facts ...

    www.britannica.com/.../Johann-Wolfgang-von-Goethe

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s father, Johann Caspar Goethe (1710–82), was a man of leisure who lived on an inherited fortune. Johann’s mother, Catharina Elisabeth Textor (1731–1808), was a daughter of Frankfurt’s most senior official. Goethe was the eldest of seven children, though only one other survived into adulthood, his sister ...

    • Life and Works
    • Philosophical Background
    • Scientific Background and Influence
    • Morphology, Compensation, and Polarity
    • Theory of Colors
    • Philosophical Influence
    • References and Further Reading

    Historical studies should generally avoid the error of thinking that the circumstances of a philosopher’s life necessitate their theoretical conclusions. With Goethe, however, his poetry, scientific investigations, and philosophical worldview are manifestly informed by his life, and are indeed intimately connected with his lived experiences. In the words of Georg Simmel, “…Goethe’s individual works gradually appear to take on less significance than his life as a whole. His life does not acqui...

    The Kultfigur of Goethe as the unspoiled and uninfluenced genius is doubtless over-romanticized. Goethe himself gave rise to this myth, both in his conversations with others and in his own quasi-biographical work, Dichtung und Wahrheit (1811-1833). About his study of the history of philosophy, he writes, “one doctrine or opinion seemed to me as good as another, so far, at least, as I was capable of penetrating into it,” (Goethe 1902, 182). Albert Schweitzer, usually even-handed in his attribu...

    Goethe considered his scientific contributions as important as his literary achievements. While few scholars since have shared that contention, there is no doubting the sheer range of Goethe’s scientific curiosity. In his youth, Goethe’s poetry and dramatic works featured the romantic belief in the ‘creative energy of nature’ and evidenced a certain fascination with alchemy. But court life in Weimar brought Goethe for the first time in contact with experts outside his literary comfort zone. H...

    In Goethe’s day, the reigning systematic botanical theory in Europe was that of Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778). Plants were classified according to their relation to each other into species, genera, and kingdom. As an empirical method, Linnaeus’s taxonomy ordered external characteristics — size, number, and location of individual organs — as generic traits. The problem for Goethe was two-fold. Although effective as an organizational schema, it failed to distinguish organic from inorganic natural o...

    “As to what I have done as a poet... I take no pride in it... but that in my century I am the only person who knows the truth in the difficult science of colors – of that, I say, I am not a little proud, and here I have a consciousness of a superiority to many,” (Goethe 1930, 302). Coming from the preeminent literary figure of his age, Goethe’s remarkable statement reveals to what extent he considered the Farbenlehre (1810) his life’s true work. At the same time, it was the source of perhaps...

    Goethe’s general influence on European culture is gargantuan. In 19th century Germany alone, authors like Heine, Novalis, Jean Paul, Tieck, Hoffman, and Eichendorff all owe tremendous debts to Götz and Werther. Thomas Carlyle, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Mark Twain, Kurt Tucholsky, Thomas Mann, James Joyce and too many others to name have since paid tribute to the master from Weimar. Composers like Mozart, Liszt, and Mahler dedicated works to Goethe’s drama, while Beethoven himself mused that the gr...

    1. Akademie-Ausgabe: Werke, edited under the Institut für Deutsche Sprache und Literatur der Deutschen Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Berlin (Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1952ff). 2. Berliner Ausgabe: Poetische Werke. Kunsttheoretische Schriften und Übersetzungen, edited by the Bearbeiter-Kollektiv unter Leitung von Siegfried Seidel et al., 22 Volumes (Berlin/Weimar: Aufbau-Verlag, 1965-78). 3. Die Schriften zur Naturwissenschaft, edited by Kuhn et al. (Weimar: Deutschen Akademie der Naturforsch...

  3. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832), German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher is best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, (1808-1832) which he started around the age of twenty three and didn't finish till shortly before his death sixty years later.

  4. 202 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Quotes - BrainyQuote

    www.brainyquote.com/authors/johann-wolfgang-von...

    Enjoy the best Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Quotes at BrainyQuote. Quotations by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, German Poet, Born August 28, 1749. Share with your friends.

  5. TOP 25 QUOTES BY JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE (of 1748) | A-Z ...

    www.azquotes.com/.../5628-Johann_Wolfgang_von_Goethe
    • None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies.
    • Why look for conspiracy when stupidity can explain so much. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Stupidity, Looks, Conspiracy.
    • The moment one definitely commits oneself, then Providence moves too. Whatever you think you can do, or believe you can do, begin it. Action has magic, power and grace.
    • I have come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. It is my daily mood that makes the weather....
  6. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Quotes (Author of The Sorrows of ...

    www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/285217.Johann...
    • “One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.”
    • “If you treat an individual as he is, he will remain how he is. But if you treat him as if he were what he ought to be and could be, he will become what he ought to be and could be.”
    • “A man should hear a little music, read a little poetry, and see a fine picture every day of his life, in order that worldly cares may not obliterate the sense of the beautiful which God has implanted in the human soul.”
    • “Daring ideas are like chessmen moved forward. They may be beaten, but they may start a winning game.” ― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe.
  7. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe – Wikipedia

    de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Wolfgang_von_Goethe

    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe und seine Frau Christiane hatten fünf Kinder. Nur August, der zuerst geborene, (* 25. Dezember 1789; † 27. Oktober 1830) erreichte das Erwachsenenalter. Ein Kind wurde bereits tot geboren, die anderen starben alle sehr früh, was in der damaligen Zeit nicht ungewöhnlich war.

  8. Prometheus (Goethe) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prometheus_(Goethe)

    "Prometheus" is a poem by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, in which the character of the mythic Prometheus addresses God (as Zeus) in misotheist accusation and defiance. The poem was written between 1772 and 1774 and first published in 1789 after an anonymous and unauthorised publication in 1785 by Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi.

  9. (Von hier und heute geht eine neue Epoche der Weltgeschichte aus, und ihr könnt sagen, ihr seid dabei gewesen.) — ヨハン・ヴォルフガング・フォン・ゲーテ(Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)、"The Oxford History of the French Revolution",p.193(William Doyle,2002,Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-925298-5 )