Yahoo Web Search

  1. About 61,700 search results
  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › John_HunyadiJohn Hunyadi - Wikipedia

    John Hunyadi, a Hungarian hero, was subordinated to the ideology of National Communism in the era of Ceaușescu and transmuted into a hero of Romania. [222] Pope Pius II writes that Hunyadi did not increase so much the glory of the Hungarians, but especially the glory of the Romanians among whom he was born.

    • Erzsébet Morzsinai
    • Voyk
    • Origin
    • Rise
    • Regent of The Kingdom of Hungary
    • Legacy
    • References

    John was born into a noble family in 1387 (or 1400 according to some sources) as the son of Vojk (Voicu), a boyar from Wallachia and Erzsébet Morzsinay the daughter of a Hungarian noble family. John's grandfather was named Sorb (also spelled as Serbu or Serbe), a Romanian Knyaz from the Banate of Szörény (Severin). An alternative theory states that John Hunyadi's parental line was of Cuman descent on his father's side. A theory issued at the end of the nineteenth century claims that Sorb, John's grandfather, was originally from Serbia, an origin not attested by contemporary sources. Sorb had two other sons: Mogos and Radul. What is certain is that Vojk, John's father, took the family name of Hunyadiwhen he received the estate around the Hunyad Castle from King Sigismund, in 1409, ennobled as count of Hunyad. John's mother was Erzsébet Szilágyi (Romanian: Elisabeta Mărgean) of Cinciş, the daughter of a small Hungarian noble family from Hunyad-Hunedoara. John married Erzsébet Szilágyi...

    With Sigismund and in the disputed elections

    While still a youth, the younger John Hunyadi entered the retinue of Sigismund, who appreciated his qualities. (He also was the King's creditor on several occasions.) He accompanied the monarch to Frankfurt, in Sigismund's quest for the Imperial crown in 1410, took part in the Hussite Wars in 1420, and in 1437 drove the Ottomans from Semendria. For these services he received numerous estates and a seat in the royal council. In 1438 King Albert II made Hunyadi Ban of Severin. Lying south of th...

    First battles of the Balkans

    The burden of the Ottoman War now rested with him. In 1441 he delivered Serbia by the victory of Semendria. In 1442, not far from Nagyszeben, on which he had been forced to retire, he annihilated an immense Ottoman presence, and recovered for Hungary the suzerainty of Wallachia. In February 1450, he signed an alliance treaty with Bogdan II of Moldavia. In July, he vanquished a third Turkish army near the Iron Gates. These victories made Hunyadi a prominent enemy of the Ottomans and renowned t...

    Battle of Varna

    Two days later Cesarini received tidings that a fleet of Venetian galleys had set off for the Bosporus to prevent Murad (who, crushed by his recent disasters, had retired to Anatolia) from recrossing into Europe, and the cardinal reminded the King that he had sworn to cooperate by land if the western powers attacked the Ottomans by sea. In July the Hungarian army recrossed the frontier and advanced towards the Black Sea coast in order to march to Constantinopleescorted by the galleys. Brankov...

    Brief personal rule

    At the diet which met in February 1445 a provisional government consisting of five Captain Generals was formed, with Hunyadi receiving Transylvania and four counties bordering on the Tisza, called the Partium or Körösvidék, to rule. As the anarchy resulting from the division became unmanageable, Hunyadi was elected regent of Hungary (Regni Gubernator) on June 5, 1446, in the name of Ladislaus V and given the powers of a regent. His first act as regent was to proceed against the German king Fr...

    Belgrade campaign and death

    Meanwhile, the Ottoman issue had again become acute, and, after the fall of Constantinople in 1453, it seemed natural that Sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate Hungary. His immediate objective was Belgrade. Hunyadi arrived at the siege of Belgrade at the end of 1455, after settling differences with his domestic enemies. At his own expense, he restocked the supplies and arms of the fortress, leaving in it a strong garrison under the command of his brother-in-law Mi...

    The rise of nationalism has led to hero images of John Hunyadi in the discourse of several local nationalities—each in its own way has claimed him as their own. Along with his son Matthias Corvinus, John has acquired a presence in modern Romania's political culture (images that focus on the Vlach origin rather than their careers within Hungary or on their presence as outsiders in the politics of Wallachia and Moldavia, although Hunyadi was responsible for establishing the careers of both Stephen III of Moldaviaand the controversial Vlad III of Wallachia). John Hunyadi is traditionally considered a national hero in Hungary. Among John's noted qualities, is his regional primacy in recognizing the insufficiency and unreliability of the feudal levies, instead regularly employing large professional armies. His notable contribution to the development of the science of European warfare included the emphasis on tactics and strategy in place of over-reliance on frontal assaults and mêlées. F...

    This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. 1. Engel, Pál. 2001. The realm of St. Stephen: a history of medieval Hungary, 895-1526. London, UK: I.B. Tauris. ISBN 9781860640612 2. France, John. 2005. The Crusades and the expansion of Catholic Christendom, 1000-1714. London, UK: Routledge. ISBN 9780415371285 3. Held, Joseph. 1985. Hunyadi: legend and reality. East European monographs, no. 178. Boulder, CO: East European Monographs. ISBN 9780880330701 4. Mureşanu, Camil. 2001. John Hunyadi: defender of Christendom. Iaşi, RO: Center for Romanian Studies. ISBN 9789739432184 5. Nicolle, David, and Angus McBride. 2004. Hungary and the fall of Eastern Europe 1000-1568. Men-at-arms series, 195. Oxford, UK: Osprey. ISBN 9780850458336 6. Varga, Domokos. 1982. Hungary in greatness and decline: the 14th and 15th centuries. Atlanta, GA: Hungarian Cultural Foundation. ISBN 9780914648116

  2. John Hunyadi. John Hunyadi (Hungarian: Hunyadi János, Serbian: Сибињанин Јанко / Sibinjanin Janko, Romanian: Ioan de Hunedoara; c. 1406 – 11 August 1456) was a leading Hungarian military and political figure in Central and Southeastern Europe during the 15th century. According to most contemporary sources, he was the member of ...

  3. John Hunyadi, the White Knight of Wallachia, not only avoided being de-tainted by Ottoman cannonballs, he actually somehow managed to beat the hell out of them on multiple occasions – an almost-unparalleled feat of badass heathen-smiting generalship that rivals the epicness of that ridiculously-gigantic run-on sentence I just unleashed on ...

    • Ancestry
    • Family
    • Rise of A General
    • Regent of The Kingdom of Hungary
    • Legacy
    • Notes
    • References
    • Further Reading

    The Hunyadi family were a noble family in the medieval Kingdom of Hungary from Wallachia and had Romanian origin according to the majority of sources. Hunyadi was named Valachus or Balachus ("the Wallachian") in some contemporary texts. According to some historians (including Ferenc Glatz), he was of Cumanorigin. According to other opinions, John Hunyadi came from a modest Romanian noble family from Hațeg. The Hunyadis were first recorded in a royal charter of 1409 in which Sigismund of Luxembourg, then King of Hungary, granted Vojk the Hunyad Castle (in contemporary Hungarian language: Hunyadvár, laterVajdahunyad, in present-day Romanian language: Hunedoara) and its estates for his distinction in the wars against the Ottomans. Woyk, Hunyadi's father, was described as being of Vlach descent by medieval chroniclers and modern historians. He was a nobile Knyaz from Wallachia. However the name "Vayk" may suggest a Tatar-Cumanorigin. Matthias Corvinus' court historian Antonio Bonfini fl...

    In 1432, Hunyadi married Erzsébet Szilágyi (c. 1410-1483), a Hungarian noblewoman. John Hunyadi had two children, Ladislaus and Matthias Corvinus.[citation needed] The former was executed on the order of King Ladislaus V for the murder of Ulrich II of Celje, a relative of the king.[citation needed] The latter was elected king on 20 January 1458, Matthias after Ladislaus V's death. It was the first time in the history of the Kingdom of Hungary that a member of the nobility, without dynastic ancestry and relationship, mounted the royal throne.[citation needed]

    While still a young man, Hunyadi entered the retinue of Sigismund, who appreciated his qualities. He also loaned the king money on several occasions. A document describing a loan agreement of 1.200 gold florins, dated from 1434 refers to him "Johannes dictus Olah". He accompanied the monarch to Frankfurt in Sigismund's quest for the Imperial crown in 1410, took an active part in the Hussite Wars in 1420, and in 1437 was sent south to successfully raise the Turkish siege of Semendria. The young knight served many powerful magnates and strategists of Sigismund, including Stefan Lazarević and Philippo Scolari. Between 1431 and 1433 he made the acquaintance of the condottiere (mercenary captain) Francesco Sforza at the court of prince Filippo Maria Visconti. In Milan Hunyadi studied the new military art of Italy. Later he received numerous landed estates and a privileged position in the royal council of Hungary. His star was soon in the ascendant and in 1438 King Albert found Hunyadi pr...

    Brief personal rule

    As the anarchy resulting from the division became unmanageable, Hunyadi was elected regent of Hungary (Regni Gubernator) on 5 June 1446 in the name of Ladislaus V and given the powers of a regent. His first act as regent was to proceed against the German king Frederick III, who refused to release Ladislaus V. After ravaging Styria, Carinthia, and Carniolaand threatening Vienna, Hunyadi's difficulties elsewhere compelled him to make a truce with Frederick for two years. In 1448 he received a g...

    Belgrade victory and death

    Meanwhile, the Ottoman issue had again become acute, and, after the fall of Constantinople in 1453, it seemed natural that Sultan Mehmed II was rallying his resources in order to subjugate Hungary. His immediate objective was Nándorfehérvár (today Belgrade). Nándorfehérvár was a major castle-fortress, and a gate keeper of south Hungary. The fall of this stronghold would have opened a clear way to the heart of Central Europe. Hunyadi arrived at the siege of Nándorfehérvár at the end of 1455, a...

    Along with his son Matthias Corvinus, Hunyadi is considered a Hungarian national hero and praised as its defender against the Ottoman threat. He was born into and ably served the Kingdom of Hungary and the Catholic Church. Hunyadi was a member of the Hungarian aristocracy and a subject of the Hungarian crown. He is mentioned in Szózat, a poem which is considered a "second anthem" of Hungary. Romanian historiography gives Hunyadi a place of importance in the history of Romania too. He is remembered in Romania as a national hero mostly due to his Romaniannote 1 origin and his role as Voivode of Transylvania (a region at the time part of the Kingdom of Hungary and now part of Romania). Hunyadi was also responsible for establishing the careers of both Stephen III of Moldavia and the controversial Vlad III of Wallachia. Pope Pius II writes that Hunyadi did not increase so much the glory of the Hungarians, but especially the glory of the Romanians among whom he was born. The French writer...

    ^According to the majority of references, modern historians and mainstream sources. There are also alternative researches suggesting other origin as it is already explained in the article.

    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911) Encyclopædia Britannica(11th ed.) Cambridge University Press
    Sources cited by the Encyclopædia Britannica:
    Enea Silvius Piccolomini (Pope Pius II) In Europa - Historia Austrialis, BAV, URB, LAT. 405, ff.245, IIII kal. Aprilis MCCCCLVIII, Ex Urbe Roma Bilanguical (German-Latin) edition:
    Camil Mureşanu, John Hunyadi. Defender of Christendom, Iaşi-Oxford-Portland 2001

    In English: 1. Held, Joseph (1985). Hunyadi: Legend and Reality. Columbia University Press. ISBN [[Special:BookSources/0-88033-070-1|0-88033-070-1]]. 2. Engel, Pál (2001). The Realm of St Stephen: A History of Medieval Hungary, 895-1526. I.B. Tauris Publishers. ISBN 1-86064-061-3. 3. Muresanu, Camil (Trans. by Laura Treptow) (2000). John Hunyadi: Defender of Christendom. Center for Romanian Studies. ISBN 973-9432-18-2. Additional Books that Mention John Hunyadi: 1. Florescu, Radu and Raymond T. McNally (1990). Dracula, Prince of Many Faces: His Life and His Times. Back Bay Books. ISBN 0-316-28656-7. 2. Lord Kinross, Patrick Balfour (1979). The Ottoman Centuries: The Rise and Fall of the Turkish Empire. Harper Perennial. ISBN 0-688-08093-6. In Hungarian: 1. Benedek, Elek. Nagy Magyarok Élete: Hunyadi János - Hunyadi Mátyás. Pannon-Literatúra Kft.. ISBN 963-9355-94-1. 2. Czuczor, Gergely. Hunyadi János és három más történet. Unikornis Kiadó. ISBN 963-427-462-5. 3. Darvas, József (2004...

  4. The White Knight of Wallachia. John Hunyadi, the White Knight of Wallachia, was born in the year 1407. He was a mighty Catholic warrior who led the forces of the Kingdom of Hungary to halt the advances of the Ottoman Empire into Christendom. A military genius, his entire life was spent in this noble cause.

  5. Aug 07, 2021 · János Hunyadi, English John Hunyadi or John Huniades, (born 1407?, Hunyad, Transylvania—died August 11,1456, Belgrade), Hungarian general and governor of the kingdom of Hungary from 1446 to 1452, who was a leading commander against the Turks in the 15th century.

  1. People also search for