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  1. John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767, to John and Abigail Adams (née Smith) in a part of Braintree, Massachusetts that is now Quincy. He was named after his mother's maternal grandfather, Colonel John Quincy, after whom Quincy, Massachusetts, is named, who died two days after Adams's birth.

  2. John Brown (May 9, 1800 – December 2, 1859) was an American abolitionist leader. First reaching national prominence for his radical abolitionism and fighting in Bleeding Kansas , he was eventually captured and executed for a failed incitement of a slave rebellion at Harpers Ferry preceding the American Civil War .

  3. In Depth with Peter Baker and Susan Glasser. Peter Baker (New York Times) and Susan Glasser (New Yorker) join Book TV to talk and take calls about Russia, the Trump administration, U.S. foreign ...

  4. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › BB - Wikipedia

    B, or b, is the second letter of the Latin-script alphabet, used in the modern English alphabet, the alphabets of other western European languages and others worldwide.Its name in English is bee (pronounced / ˈ b iː /), plural bees.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › John_HancockJohn Hancock - Wikipedia

    John Hancock (January 23, 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] – October 8, 1793) was an American Founding Father, merchant, statesman, and prominent Patriot of the American Revolution.

  6. William Lloyd Garrison (December 10, 1805 – May 24, 1879) was a prominent American Christian, abolitionist, journalist, suffragist, and social reformer.He is best known for his widely read antislavery newspaper The Liberator, which he founded in 1831 and published in Boston until slavery in the United States was abolished by constitutional amendment in 1865.

  7. The most influential of Adams' final judicial appointments in 1801 was naming John Marshall as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He held that position until his death in 1835 and shaped the court's decisions and dramatically raised its stature. He also defined the basic relationship of the judiciary to the rest of the federal government.

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