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  1. Richard, Earl of Cornwall crowned King of the Romans ...

    www.historytoday.com/archive/richard-earl...

    May 05, 2007 · Richard, Earl of Cornwall, was the second son of King John and the younger brother of Henry III. Far more forceful and competent than his brother, he was Frederick II’s brother-in-law, one of the richest men in Europe and one of the few English barons of the time who actually spoke English.

  2. King of the Romans | Historica Wiki | Fandom

    historica.fandom.com/wiki/King_of_the_Romans

    King of the Romans was a title used by the kings of Germany during the Middle Ages. The title was first used under Emperor Henry II in 1014-1024, and the King of the Romans would usually head to Italy to be crowned King of Italy before receiving papal confirmation as Holy Roman Emperor.

  3. Henry VII Hohenstaufen, king of the Romans (1211 - c.1242 ...

    www.geni.com/people/Henry-VII-Hohenstaufen-king...

    Genealogy for Henry VII Hohenstaufen, king of the Romans (1211 - c.1242) family tree on Geni, with over 200 million profiles of ancestors and living relatives. People Projects Discussions Surnames

  4. King of the Romans | Corner by Corner

    cornerbycorner.wordpress.com/tag/king-of-the-romans

    The Wenceslaus who drowned Saint John of Nepomuk in the river was King Wenceslaus IV, a member of the House of Luxembourg and King of Bohemia (by inheritance) as well as the German King (by election – by a bunch of princes, not the common people) and ruling under the name King of the Romans, which I believe means he was a Holy Roman Emperor ...

  5. The Romans: The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire - History

    www.historyonthenet.com/romans-the-rise-and-fall...

    Prasatugas, King of the Iceni tribe who had signed a peace treaty with the Romans, died. His wife, Boudicca intended to honour the treaty, but after the local Roman authorities seized Prasatugas’s property and raped his two daughters, Boudicca retaliated by signing a treaty with Trinovantes who were hostile to the Romans.

  6. Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans - 2nd ...

    www.routledge.com/Herod-King-of-the-Jews-and...

    Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans examines the life, work, and influence of this controversial figure, who remains the most highly visible of the Roman client kings under Augustus. Herod’s rule shaped the world in which Christianity arose and his influence can still be seen today. In this expanded second edition, additions to the original text include discussion of the ...

  7. Roman England, the Roman in Britain 43 - 410 AD

    www.historic-uk.com/.../The-Romans-in-England

    The Romans quickly established control over the tribes of present day southeastern England. One British chieftain of the Catuvallauni tribe known as Caractacus , who initially fled from Camulodunum (Colchester) to present day south Wales, stirred up some resistance until his defeat and capture in 51 AD.

  8. Herod the Great: Friend of the Romans and Parthians ...

    www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/people...

    Often we think of Herod the Great in relation to ancient Rome. We understand the king as steadfast in his loyalty to this western imperial power—and rightly so. Herod’s behavior routinely betrayed his Roman interests, and inscriptions attest to and advertise this allegiance by identifying him with such titles as “Friend of the Romans.”

  9. The Beginnings of Rome - Rome under the Monarchy

    www.penfield.edu/webpages/jgiotto/onlinetextbook...

    As these two cultures blended, it was agreed that the king would alternate between a Roman king and a Sabine king, and so the first king of Rome, Romulus was a Roman, the second, a Sabine, the third, a Roman, and the fourth, a Sabine. The People who Influenced Rome. The Romans were influenced by other civilizations and people living in Italy.

  10. BBC - Religions - Christianity: King Herod

    www.bbc.co.uk/.../christianity/history/herod.shtml

    Sep 18, 2009 · King Herod Herod was a king appointed by the Romans ©. The Romans appointed King Herod as King of Judea in 37 BC. Historians agree that in many respects Herod had a hugely successful reign.