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  1. Louis I of Hungary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Louis_I_of_Hungary

    However, Louis's partisans defeated the pretender, and Louis made him abbot of the Pannonhalma Archabbey in Hungary. Louis appointed Vladislaus II of Opole his governor in Poland. [240] In summer 1377, Louis invaded the territories held by the Lithuanian prince, George, in Lodomeria.

  2. Louis I | king of Hungary | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › biography › Louis-I-king-of-Hungary

    Sep 06, 2020 · Louis I, king of Hungary from 1342 and of Poland (as Louis) from 1370, who, during much of his long reign, was involved in wars with Venice and Naples. Louis was crowned king of Hungary in succession to his father, Charles I, on July 21, 1342. In 1346 he was defeated by the Venetians at Zara (now

  3. Louis I of Hungary | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Louis_I_of_Hungary
    • Family
    • Biography
    • Economic and Legislative Activity
    • Domestic, Military and Religious Policy
    • Wars and Campaigns
    • Inheritance of Poland and Death
    • Peace in Hungary in A Turbulent Europe
    • Titles

    Louis was the third son of Charles I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Poland, the daughter of Władysław I the Elbow-high and sister to Casimir III of Poland. In 1342, Louis married his first wife, Margaret (1335 – 1349), underage daughter of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who died while still a minor. He then married his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen II of Bosnia (who became Louis's vassal) and Elizabeth of Kuyavia. Her maternal grandfather was Polish Casimir II of Kuyavia, son of Ziemomysł of Kuyaviaand Salome of Eastern Pomerania. Louis had four daughters by his second wife, three of which survived infancy: 1. Catherine(1370 – 1378) 2. Mary, his successor in Hungary, who married Sigismund, at that time Margrave of Brandenburg (1371 – 1395), who became King of Hungary(1387–1437) and Holy Roman Emperor (1433–1437). 3. Hedwig, his successor as King of Poland (1384-1399), married Jogaila, then Grand Duke of Lithuania.

    Louis, named for his great uncle, Saint Louis of Toulouse.Louis acquired the seven liberal arts (grammar, rhetoric, logic, geometry, arithmetic, music, astronomy).[citation needed]When he was sixteen, Louis understood Latin, German and Italian as well as his mother tongue. He owed his excellent education to the care of his mother, a woman of profound political sagacity, who was his chief counsellor in diplomatic affairs during the greater part of his long reign.[citation needed] In 1342, at the age of sixteen, he succeeded his father as king of Hungary and was crowned at Székesfehérvár on the 21st of July with great enthusiasm. Louis led his armies many times in person.[citation needed] Besides his best known campaigns, he fought in Bulgaria, Bosnia, Wallachia Serbia, Lithuania and against the Golden Horde. The first Ottoman Hungarian clash occurred during his reign.[citation needed] He led assaults personally and climbed city walls together with his soldiers. He shared the privatio...

    Culture of the royal court

    Under the reign of his father (Charles I of Hungary), the Renaissance arrived in Hungary.The Renaissance style came directly from Italy during the Quattrocento to Hungary foremost in the Central European region. The development of the early Hungarian-Italian relationships was a reason of this infiltration, which weren't manifested only in dynastic connections, but in cultural, humanistic and commercial relations. This effect was getting stronger from the 14th century.In the first half of the...

    Monetary and economic background

    Kingdom of Hungary under the Angevins For the new economic taxation and customs system of his father see the Economic policy of Charles Iarticle. One of the primary sources of power of his father was the wealth derived from the gold mines of east and northern Hungary. Eventually itself the gold production of mines reached the remarkable figure of 3,000 pounds (1,400 kg) of gold annually – one third of the total production of the world as then known, and five times as much as that of any other...

    Style of government

    Despite the tradition of the strong parliaments in Hungary, Louis the Great did not want to share the royal power with the diet permanently. He convoked the Diet in 1351 and once again in 1352, but never after. The influence of the noblemen extended only to their county. Counties did not have either a permanent armed force nor other authority than the sedria (Latin: county). There were no local governments in the counties during the remainder of Louis' rule. To judge local criminals and admin...

    Military structure

    During the four decades of his reign, the economic policy and power he inherited from his father was more than enough to carry on his military campaigns. He turned that accumulated economic capital to the uses of power.[citation needed] The Angevins introduced the so-called honor (=office; in old Hungarian becsü) system.[citation needed] Instead of further large donations (fiefdom/feudum) the faithful magnates (the Baron class and above) of the king were given an office.[citation needed] Powe...

    Role as champion of the church

    Their following campaigns "in every directions" (for example, against the Orthodox Serbs, the heretic Bosnians and pagan Lithuanians and Tartars) are in close connection with the political and converting ambitions of the Holy See. Louis the Great often provided military help in the inner fight of Ecclesiastic State of the Popes. Hungarian troops protected the Pope on his return from Avignon to Rome. In 1356 a letter from the Pope called him "Christ's shield, the Lord's athlete". In the meanti...

    During his 40 years-long reign, there were only three years of peace (1342, 1375, 1376).[citation needed]

    In 1370, Louis' maternal uncle, Casimir the Great, died leaving only daughters and illegitimate sons. Since arrangements had been made for Louis's succession as early as 1355, he became king of Poland upon his uncle's death in right of his mother, who held much of the practical power until her death in 1380. Thus, the first union of Hungary and Polandwas achieved. When Louis died in 1382, the Hungarian throne was inherited by his daughter Mary. In Poland, however, the lords of Lesser Poland did not want to continue the personal union with Hungary, nor to accept Mary's fiancé Sigismund as a regent. They therefore chose Mary's younger sister, Hedwig as their new monarch. After two years of negotiations with Louis widow, Elizabeth of Bosnia, who was regent of Hungary, and a civil war in Greater Poland (1383), Hedwig finally came to Kraków and was crowned "King" (not Queen) of Poland on 16 November 1384. The masculine gender in her title was intended to underline the fact that she was a...

    Although he waged a host of campaigns outside Hungary, Louis did keep peace within Hungary itself. In an era when Spain was harassed by the Arabs, France targeted by the English, Germany tormented by the rivalries of its princes, Italy the scene of bloody conflicts among its city-states, Poland and Russia the objects of Lithuanian and Tartar attacks, and Byzantium and the Balkan states subject to Turkish raids and expansion, Hungary flourished as an island of peace. In death as in life, Louis expressed his wish to lie eternally by his idol's side. Accordingly, he was laid to rest in Nagyvárad beside the tomb of King Saint Ladislaus.

    King of Hungary, Dalmatia, Croatia, Rama, Bulgaria, Serbia, Galicia, Lodomeria, Jerusalem and Sicily from 1342, King of Poland from 1370

    • 5 March 1326 Visegrád, Kingdom of Hungary
    • Catholicism
    • Charles I
    • Margaret of Luxembourg Elizabeth of Bosnia
  4. Louis I of Hungary | Historipedia Official Wiki | Fandom

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org › wiki › Louis_I_of

    Louis I, also Louis the Great (Hungarian Nagy Lajos; Croatian Ludovik Veliki; Slovak Ľudovít Veľký) or Louis the Hungarian (Polish Ludwik Węgierski; 5 March 132610 September 1382), was King of Hungary and Croatia from 1342 and King of Poland from 1370. He was the first child of Charles I of Hungary and his wife, Elizabeth of Poland, to survive infancy. A 1338 treaty between his father and ...

    • 5 March 1326 Visegrád, Kingdom of Hungary
    • Elizabeth of Poland
    • 16 September 1382 Székesfehérvár Basilica
    • Roman Catholic
  5. Louis I of Hungary - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge core

    infogalactic.com › info › Louis_I_of_Hungary
    • Childhood and Youth
    • Reign
    • Family
    • Legacy

    Born on 5 March 1326, Louis was the third son of Charles I of Hungary and his wife, Elizabeth of Poland. He was named for his father's uncle, Louis, Bishop of Toulouse, canonized in 1317. The first-born son of his parents, Charles, died before Louis was born.Louis became his father's heir after the death of his brother Ladislaus in 1329. He had a liberal education by the standards of his age and learned French, German and Latin. He showed a special interest in history and astrology. A cleric from Wrocław, Nicholas, taught him the basic principles of Christian faith. However, Louis's religious zeal was due to his mother's influence. In a royal charter, Louis remembered that in his childhood, a knight of the royal court, Peter Poháros, often carried him on his shoulders. His two tutors, Nicholas Drugeth and Nicholas Knesich, saved the lives of both Louis and his younger brother, Andrew, when Felician Záh attempted to assassinate the royal family in Visegrádon 17 April 1330. Louis was...

    First years

    Charles I died on 16 July 1342. Five days later, Csanád Telegdi, Archbishop of Esztergom, crowned Louis king with the Holy Crown of Hungary in Székesfehérvár. Although Louis had attained the age of majority, his mother Elizabeth "acted as a sort of co-regent" for decades, because she exerted a powerful influence on him. Louis inherited a rich treasury from his father, who had strengthened royal authority and ruled without holding Dietsduring the last decades of his reign. Louis introduced a n...

    The Neapolitan campaigns

    Louis's brother, Andrew, was murdered in Aversa on 18 September 1345. Louis and his mother accused Andrew's widow, Queen Joanna I, Robert, Prince of Taranto, Charles, Duke of Durazzo and other members of the Neapolitan branches of the Capetian House of Anjou of plotting against Andrew. In his letter of 15 January 1346 to Pope Clement VI, Louis demanded that the pope dethrone the "husband-killer" queen and grant Naples to Andrew's posthumous son by Joanna, Charles Martel, Duke of Calabria. Lou...

    Expansion

    Casimir III of Poland urged Louis to intervene in his war with the Lithuanians who had occupied Brest, Volodymyr-Volynskyi, and other important towns in Halych and Lodomeria in the previous years. The two monarchs agreed that Halych and Lodomeria would be integrated into the Kingdom of Hungary after Casimir's death. Casimir also authorized Louis to redeem the two realms for 100,000 florins if Casimir fathered a son. Louis led his army to Cracow in June 1351. Because Casimir fell ill, Louis be...

    Louis's first wife, Margaret, was the oldest child of Charles, Margrave of Moravia, and his first wife, Blanche of Valois. Margaret was born in 1335. The exact date of the marriage of Louis and Margaret is unknown, but it occurred between 1342 and 1345.Margaret died childless on 7 September 1349. According to the Chronicle of Parthénope, the Neapolitan princes whom Louis had imprisoned during his first campaign in Southern Italy proposed him to marry Queen Joanna I's younger sister and heir, Mary. She was the widow of Charles of Durazzo, who had been executed on Louis's orders. During the siege of Aversa in the summer of 1350, Louis met her envoy in the nearby Trentola-Ducenta and the terms of their marriage were accepted.However, Mary was forced to marry Robet of Baux after Louis left Southern Italy. Louis married his second wife, Elizabeth, around 20 June 1353. Elizabeth was the daughter of Stephen II, Ban of Bosnia, and Stephen's wife, Elizabeth of Kuyavia. Louis and his new wife...

    Louis was the only Hungarian monarch to receive the epithet "Great". He was mentioned under this byname not only in Hungarian chronicles in the 14th and 15th centuries, but also in a 17th-century genealogy of the Capetians. Both his chivalrous personality and his successful military campaigns contributed to the development of his fame as a "great king". Louis waged wars in almost each year during his reign. Louis "always desired peace at home and war abroad for neither can be made without the other", according to Antonio Bonfini's late 15th-century chronicle. Historian Enikő Csukovits writes that Louis's military actions show that he continued and accomplished his father's policy through recovering Croatia and Dalmatia and waging wars in Southern Italy, in Lithuania and in the Balkan Peninsula. On the other hand, Pál Engel says that Louis's "expeditions often lacked a realistic goal and sometimes even a reasonable pretext ...it was war itself that gave him pleasure". In the age of R...

  6. Louis I of Hungary

    enacademic.com › dic › enwiki

    Louis was the third son of Charles I of Hungary and Elisabeth of Poland, the daughter of Ladislaus the Short and sister to Casimir III of Poland.. In 1342, Louis married his first wife, Margaret (1335 – 1349), underaged daughter of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who died while still a minor.

  7. Louis I of Hungary (1326-1382) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org › wiki › Louis_I_of_Hungary
    • Family
    • Biography
    • Economic and Legislative Activity
    • Domestic, Military and Religious Policy
    • Inheritance of Poland and Death
    • Peace in Hungary in A Turbulent Europe
    • Titles
    • Sources
    • Residences

    Louis was the third son of Charles I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Poland, Queen of Hungary|Elizabeth of Poland, the daughter of Władysław I the Elbow-high and sister to Casimir III of Poland. In 1342, Louis married his first wife, Margaret (1335 – 1349), underage daughter of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who died while still a minor. He then married his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen II of Bosnia, who became Louis's vassal, and Elizabeth of Kuyavia, in 1353 . Her maternal grandfather was Polish Casimir II of Kuyavia, son of Ziemomysł of Kuyavia and Salome of Eastern Pomerania. Louis had four daughters by his second wife, three of which survived infancy: 1. Catherine(1370 – 1378) 2. Mary, his successor in Hungary, who married Sigismund, at that time Margrave of Brandenburg (1371 – 1395), who became King of Hungary (1387–1437) and Holy Roman Emperor(1433–1437). 3. Hedwig, his successor in Poland, who married Jogaila, then Grand Duke of Lithuania

    Louis, named for his great uncle, Saint Louis of Toulouse.Louis acquired the seven liberal arts(grammar, rhetoric, logic, geometry, arithmetic, music, astronomy).When he was sixteen, Louis understood Latin, German and Italian as well as his mother tongue. He owed his excellent education to the care of his mother, a woman of profound political sagacity, who was his chief counsellor in diplomatic affairs during the greater part of his long reign. In 1342, at the age of sixteen, he succeeded his father as king of Hungary and was crowned at Székesfehérvár on the 21st of July with great enthusiasm. Louis led his armies many times in person. Besides his best known campaigns, he fought in Bulgaria, Bosnia, Wallachia, Serbia, Lithuania and against the Golden Horde. The first OttomanHungarian clash occurred during his reign. He led assaults personally and climbed city walls together with his soldiers. He shared the privations and hardships of camp life with his soldiers. Although a few legen...

    Culture of the royal court

    Under the reign of his father (Charles I of Hungary), the Renaissance arrived in Hungary.The Renaissance style came directly from Italy during the Quattrocento to Hungary foremost in the Central European region. The development of the early Hungarian-Italian relationships was a reason of this infiltration, which weren't manifested only in dynastic connections, but in cultural, humanistic and commercial relations. This effect was getting stronger from the 14th century.In the first half of the...

    Monetary and economic background

    Kingdom of Hungary under the Angevins For the new economic taxation and customs system of his father see the Economic policy of Charles Iarticle. One of the primary sources of power of his father was the wealth derived from the gold mines of east and northern Hungary. Eventually itself the gold production of mines reached the remarkable figure of 3,000 pounds (1,400 kg) of gold annually – one third of the total production of the world as then known, and five times as much as that of any other...

    Style of government

    Despite the Hungarian tradition of the strong parliaments, Louis the Great did not want to share his power with the diet permanently. He convoked the Diet in 1351 and once again in 1352, but never after. The influence of the noblemen extended only to their county. Counties did not have either a permanent armed force nor other authority than the sedria (Latin: county). We cannot even talk about local governments in the counties anymore. To judge local criminals and administration of justice in...

    Military structure

    During the four decades of his reign, the economic policy and power he inherited from his father was more than enough to carry on his military campaigns. He turned that accumulated economic capital to the uses of power. The Angevins introduced the so-called honor (=office; in old Hungarian becsü) system. Instead of further large donations (fiefdom/feudum) the faithful magnates (the Baron class and above) of the king were given an office. Powerful officials of the kingdom, like the count palat...

    Role as champion of the church

    Their following campaigns "in every directions" (for example, against the Orthodox Serbs, the heretic Bosnians and pagan Lithuanians and Tartars) are in close connection with the political and converting ambitions of the Holy See. Louis the Great often provided military help in the inner fight of Ecclesiastic State of the Popes. Hungarian troops protected the Pope on his return from Avignon to Rome. In 1356 a letter from the Pope called him "Christ's shield, the Lord's athlete". In the meanti...

    In 1370, Louis' maternal uncle, Casimir the Great, died leaving only daughters and illegitimate sons. Since arrangements had been made for Louis's succession as early as 1355, he became king of Poland upon his uncle's death in right of his mother, who held much of the practical power until her death in 1380. Thus, the first union of Hungary and Polandwas achieved. When Louis died in 1382, the Hungarian throne was inherited by his daughter Mary. In Poland, however, the lords of Lesser Poland did not want to continue the personal union with Hungary, nor to accept Mary's fiancé Sigismund as a regent. They therefore chose Mary's younger sister, Hedwig as their new monarch. After two years of negotiations with Louis widow, Elizabeth of Bosnia, who was regent of Hungary, and a civil war in Greater Poland (1383), Hedwig finally came to Krakówand was crowned "King" (not Queen) of Poland on 16 November 1384. The masculine gender in her title was intended to underline the fact that she was a...

    Although he waged a host of campaigns outside Hungary, Louis did keep peace within Hungary itself. In an era when Spain was harassed by the Arabs, France targeted by the English, Germany tormented by the rivalries of its princes, Italy the scene of bloody conflicts among its city-states, Poland and Russia the objects of Lithuanian and Tartar attacks, and Byzantium and the Balkan states subject to Turkish raids and expansion, Hungary flourished as an island of peace. In death as in life, Louis expressed his wish to lie eternally by his idol's side. Accordingly, he was laid to rest in Nagyvárad beside the tomb of King Saint Ladislaus.

    King of Hungary, Dalmatia, Croatia, Rama, Bulgaria, Serbia, Galicia, Lodomeria, Jerusalem and Sicily from 1342, King of Poland from 1370

    Engel, Pál; Kristó, Gyula; Kubinyi, András (1998). Magyarország története - 1301-1526 (The History of Hungary - 1301-1526). Budapest: Osiris Kiadó. ISBN 963-379-171-5.

    Common ancestors of Louis I of Hungary (1326-1382) and Margaret of Bohemia (1335-1349) 1. Albrecht IV von Habsburg (1188-1239) 2. Andrew II of Hungary (c1177-1235) 3. Blanca of Castile (1188-1252) 4. Burchard V. von Hohenberg (c1201-1253) 5. Béatrice de Savoie (1205-1266) 6. Gertrud Anna von Hohenberg (c1225-1281) 7. Heilwig von Kyburg (c1192-1260) 8. Louis VIII Capet (1187-1226) 9. Ramon Berenguer IV de Provence (1195-1245) 10. Rudolf I von Habsburg (1218-1291) Common ancestors of Louis I of Hungary (1326-1382) and Elizabeth of Bosnia (c1339-1387) 1. Agafia of Rus (c1192-c1248) 2. Casimir I of Kuyavia (c1212-1267) 3. Konrad of Poland (c1188-1247) Warning:Default sort key "Louis 01 Of Hungary" overrides earlier default sort key "Capet, Louis".

    • Charles I of Hungary (1288-1342)
    • Elizabeth of Bosnia (c1339-1387)
    • Margaret of Bohemia (1335-1349)
    • 1342
  8. Louis I of Hungary : definition of Louis I of Hungary and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.comLouis I of Hungary › en-en

    Louis was the third son of Charles I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Poland, the daughter of Władysław I the Elbow-high and sister to Casimir III of Poland.. In 1342, Louis married his first wife, Margaret (1335 – 1349), underage daughter of Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor, who died while still a minor.

  9. Louis I of Hungary - Unionpedia, the concept map

    en.unionpedia.org › i › Louis_I_of_Hungary

    Louis I, also Louis the Great (Nagy Lajos; Ludovik Veliki; Ľudovít Veľký) or Louis the Hungarian (Ludwik Węgierski; 5 March 132610 September 1382), was King of Hungary and Croatia from 1342 and King of Poland from 1370. 550 relations.

  10. Louis II of Hungary - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Louis_II_of_Hungary

    This was disastrous for Louis' kingdom; without the strategically important cities of Belgrade and Šabac, Hungary, including Buda, was open to further Turkish conquests. Joachimsthaler of the Kingdom of Bohemia (1525) was the first thaler (dollar).