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  1. Lucy (2014) - IMDb

    www.imdb.com/title/tt2872732

    Jul 25, 2014 · Directed by Luc Besson. With Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-sik Choi, Amr Waked. A woman, accidentally caught in a dark deal, turns the tables on her captors and transforms into a merciless warrior evolved beyond human logic.

    • (435.5K)
    • Luc Besson
    • R
    • 3 min
  2. Lucy (2014 film) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_(2014_film)

    Lucy is a 2014 French science fiction action film written and directed by Luc Besson and produced by his wife Virginie Besson-Silla for his company EuropaCorp. It is an English-language film shot in Taipei, Paris, and New York City. It stars Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Choi Min-sik, and Amr Waked.

  3. Lucy (Australopithecus) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_(Australopithecus)

    Lucy is the common name of AL 288-1, several hundred pieces of fossilized bone representing 40 percent of the skeleton of a female of the hominin species Australopithecus afarensis. In Ethiopia , the assembly is also known as Dinkinesh , which means "you are marvelous" in the Amharic language.

    • 3.2 million years
    • Lucy
  4. Lucy (2014) - Rotten Tomatoes

    www.rottentomatoes.com/m/lucy_2014

    When a boyfriend tricks Lucy (Scarlett Johansson) into delivering a briefcase to a supposed business contact, the once-carefree student is abducted by thugs who intend to turn her into a drug mule ...

    • (236)
    • mystery and thriller, sci fi, action
    • R
  5. Lucy | fossil hominin | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/topic/Lucy-fossil

    Lucy, nickname for a remarkably complete (40 percent intact) hominin skeleton found by Donald Johanson at Hadar, Eth., on Nov. 24, 1974, and dated to 3.2 million years ago. The specimen is usually classified as Australopithecus afarensis and suggests—by having long arms, short legs, an apelike

  6. Lucy's Story | Institute of Human Origins

    iho.asu.edu/about/lucys-story
    • Discovery
    • Taxonomy
    • Evolution
    • Cause
    • Characteristics
    • Geology
    • Details

    Lucy was found by Donald Johanson and Tom Gray on November 24, 1974, at the site of Hadar in Ethiopia. They had taken a Land Rover out that day to map in another locality. After a long, hot morning of mapping and surveying for fossils, they decided to head back to the vehicle. Johanson suggested taking an alternate route back to the Land Rover, through a nearby gully. Within moments, he spotted a right proximal ulna (forearm bone) and quickly identified it as a hominid. Shortly thereafter, he saw an occipital (skull) bone, then a femur, some ribs, a pelvis, and the lower jaw. Two weeks later, after many hours of excavation, screening, and sorting, several hundred fragments of bone had been recovered, representing 40 percent of a single hominid skeleton. Later in the night of November 24, there was much celebration and excitement over the discovery of what looked like a fairly complete hominid skeleton. There was drinking, dancing, and singing; the Beatles song Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds was playing over and over. At some point during that night, no one remembers when or by whom, the skeleton was given the name Lucy. The name has stuck.

    The term hominid refers to a member of the zoological family Hominidae. Hominidae encompasses all species originating after the human/African ape ancestral split, leading to and including all species of Australopithecus and Homo. While these species differ in many ways, hominids share a suite of characteristics that define them as a group. The most conspicuous of these traits is bipedal locomotion, or walking upright.

    Evidence now strongly suggests that the Hadar material, as well as fossils from elsewhere in East Africa from the same time period, belong to a single, sexually dimorphic species known as Australopithecus afarensis. At Hadar, the size difference is very clear, with larger males and smaller females being fairly easy to distinguish. Lucy clearly fits into the smaller group.

    No cause has been determined for Lucys death. One of the few clues we have is the conspicuous lack of postmortem carnivore and scavenger marks. Typically, animals that were killed by predators and then scavenged by other animals (such as hyaenas) will show evidence of chewing, crushing, and gnawing on the bones. The ends of long bones are often missing, and their shafts are sometimes broken (which enables the predator to get to the marrow). In contrast, the only damage we see on Lucy's bones is a single carnivore tooth puncture mark on the top of her left pubic bone. This is what is called a perimortem injury, one occurring at or around the time of death. If it occurred after she died but while the bone was still fresh, then it may not be related to her death.

    There are several indicators which give a fair idea of her age. Her third molars (wisdom teeth) are erupted and slightly worn, indicating that she was fully adult. All the ends of her bones had fused and her cranial sutures had closed, indicating completed skeletal development. Her vertebrae show signs of degenerative disease, but this is not always associated with older age. All these indicators, when taken together, suggest that she was a young, but fully mature, adult when she died.

    The hominid-bearing sediments in the Hadar formation are divided into three members. Lucy was found in the highest of thesethe Kada Hadar or KHmember. While fossils cannot be dated directly, the deposits in which they are found sometimes contain volcanic flows and ashes, which can now be dated with the 40Ar/39Ar (Argon-Argon) dating technique. Armed with these dates and bolstered by paleomagnetic, paleontological, and sedimentological studies, researchers can place fossils into a dated framework with accuracy and precision. Lucy is dated to just less than 3.18 million years old.

    Although several hundred fragments of hominid bone were found at the Lucy site, there was no duplication of bones. A single duplication of even the most modest of bone fragments would have disproved the single skeleton claim, but no such duplication is seen in Lucy. The bones all come from an individual of a single species, a single size, and a single developmental age. In life, she would have stood about three-and-a-half feet tall, and weighed about 60 to 65 pounds.

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  8. I Love Lucy - Watch Full Episodes - CBS.com

    www.cbs.com/shows/i_love_lucy

    Lucy Ricardo is the wacky wife of Cuban bandleader Ricky Ricardo. Living in New York, Ricky tries to succeed in show business while Lucy -- always trying to help -- usually manages to get in some kind of trouble that drives Ricky crazy.

  9. Lucy - Trailer (Official - HD) - YouTube

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=bN7ksFEVO9U

    Lucy - July 25 http://www.LucyMovie.com/ From La Femme Nikita and The Professional to The Fifth Element, writer/director Luc Besson has created some of the t...

    • 3 min
    • 5M
    • Universal Pictures
  10. Lucille Ball - IMDb

    www.imdb.com/name/nm0000840

    Lucille Ball, Actress: I Love Lucy. The woman who will always be remembered as the crazy, accident-prone, lovable Lucy Ricardo was born Lucille Desiree Ball on August 6, 1911 in Jamestown, New York. Her father died before she was four, and her mother worked several jobs, so she and her younger brother were raised by their grandparents. Always willing to take responsibility for her ...

    • Actress, Production Manager, Soundtrack
    • April 26, 1989
    • August 6, 1911
  11. St. Lucy | History & Feast Day | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Saint-Lucy

    St. Lucy is venerated on her feast day, December 13, by a variety of ceremonies. In Sweden , St. Lucia’s Day marks the beginning of the Christmas celebration. On that day the eldest daughter of the family traditionally dresses in a white robe and wears as a crown an evergreen wreath studded with candles.