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  1. Margaret of Sicily (also called Margaret of Hohenstaufen or Margaret of Germany) (1 December 1241, in Foggia – 8 August 1270, in Frankfurt-am-Main) was a Princess of Sicily and Germany, and a member of the House of Hohenstaufen.

    Margaret of Sicily - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_of_Sicily
  2. Margaret of Sicily (also called Margaret of Hohenstaufen or Margaret of Germany) (1 December 1241, in Foggia – 8 August 1270, in Frankfurt-am-Main) was a Princess of Sicily and Germany, and a member of the House of Hohenstaufen.

  3. Margaret of Sicily or Margherita di Sicilia-Aragona (1331 in Palermo – 1377 in Neustadt) was a Sicilian princess, daughter of the King Frederick III of Sicily and his wife Eleanor of Anjou. In 1348 she married Rudolf II, Count Palatine of the Rhine , and was Countess Palatine of the Rhine until 1353, year of the husband's death.

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    The date of her birth is difficult to ascertain because there is controversy over the exact number of children borne by her mother. Some sources say that she was the first or second child, born by the end of 1237; others say that she was the last child, born in December 1241, when Isabella died in childbirth. Historians commonly accept the latter date.

    Shortly after her birth (1242), Margaret was betrothed to Albert "the Degenerate", eldest son and heir of Henry III "the Illustrious", Margrave of Meissen. The marriage took place in June 1255, the bride receiving Pleissnerland (the towns of Altenburg, Zwickau, Chemnitz and Leisnig) as her dowry. The couple settled at his residence in Eckartsberga and later moved to Wartburg, where she bore five children: three sons (Henry, Frederick and Dietzmann) and two daughters (Margaret and Agnes). Through her second son Frederick – later Margrave of Meissen – Margaret was the direct ancestor of the Electors and Kings of Saxony and English Queen consorts Margaret of Anjou and Anne of Cleves. In 1265 her husband received the titles of Landgrave of Thuringia and Count Palatine of Saxony (German: Pfalzgräf von Sachsen) after the abdication of his father, who retained control of Meissen. After the execution of her nephew Conradin (29 October 1268), Margaret, as the next legitimate relative, became...

    Margaret and Albert had five children: 1. Henry (b. 21 March 1256 - d. 25 January/23 July? 1282), inherited the Pleissnerlandin 1274. 2. Frederick(b. 1257 - d. Wartburg, 16 November 1323), Margrave of Meissen. 3. Theodoric, called Dietzmann (b. 1260 - murdered Leipzig, 10 December 1307), Margrave of Lusatia. 4. Margaret (b. 1262 - d. young, after 17 April 1273). 5. Agnes of Meissen (b. 1264 - d. September 1332), married before 21 July 1282 to Henry I, Duke of Brunswick-Grubenhagen.

  4. Margaret of Sicily (also called Margaret of Hohenstaufen or Margaret of Germany) (1 December 1241, in Foggia – 8 August 1270, in Frankfurt-am-Main ) was a Princess of Sicily and Germany, and a member of the House of Hohenstaufen. By marriage she was Landgravine of Thuringia and Countess Palatine of Saxony (German: Landgräfin von Thüringen und Pfalzgräfin von Sachsen).

  5. Queen Margaret rests in Monreale Abbey. The Story of Sicily's Greatest Medieval Queen, Margaret of Navarre, Regent from 1166 until 1171. For five eventful years Margaret – who died in 1183 – was the most power­ful woman in Europe and the Mediter­ranean, governing a polyglot realm of some two mil­lion subjects living on Sicily and in peninsular Italy south of Rome in the regions of ...

  6. Margaret, Queen of Sicily. Sometimes it takes just one strong woman to tame a pack of zealous men. Meet Margaret of Sicily. For five years during the twelfth century, Margaret of Navarre, Queen of Sicily, was the most powerful woman in Europe and the Mediterranean.

  7. Sicily is lively and interesting, and Alio succeeds in her effort to “shed some light on the experience of a woman too often considered little more than a footnote to history” (3). Margaret, Queen of Sicily should easily become the first point of reference for scholars of Margaret working in English and for general readers

    • Misty Urban
    • 2019
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