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  1. The house where Matthias Corvinus was born in Kolozsvár (present-day Cluj-Napoca, Romania) Matthias Corvinus as young monarch. Museum of Sforza Castle, Milan, Italy. Childhood (1443–1457)

    Matthias Corvinus - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthias_Corvinus
  2. Matthias Corvinus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Matthias_Corvinus

    The house where Matthias Corvinus was born in Kolozsvár (present-day Cluj-Napoca, Romania) Matthias Corvinus as young monarch. Museum of Sforza Castle, Milan, Italy. Childhood (1443–1457)

  3. Matthias Corvinus | Catholic Answers

    www.catholic.com › encyclopedia › matthias-corvinus

    Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary, son of Janos Hunyady (see Janos Hunyady) and Elizabeth Szilagyi of Horogssey, was born at Kolozsvar, February 23, 1440; d. at Vienna, April 6, 1490. In the house of his father he received along with his brother Ladislaus, a careful education under the supervision of Gregor Sanocki, who taught him the humanities.

  4. Matthias Corvinus of Hungary - New World Encyclopedia

    www.newworldencyclopedia.org › entry › Matthias
    • Early Life
    • Rule
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    Matthias (Hungary: Hunyadi Mátyás) was born at Kolozsvár (present-day Cluj-Napoca) in the house currently known as Matthias Corvinus House, the second son of John Hunyadi—a successful military leader of Kuman and Hungarian descent, who had risen through the ranks of the nobility to become regent of Hungary—and Erzsébet Szilágyi, from a Hungarian noble family. The later epithet Corvinus was coined by Matthias' biographer, the Italian Antonio Bonfini, who claimed that the Hunyadi family (whose coat of arms depicts a raven—corvus in Latin) descended from the ancient Roman gens of the Corvini. His tutors were the learned Janos Vitez, bishop of Nagyvarad, whom he subsequently raised to the primacy, and the Polish humanist Gregory of Sanok. The precocious Matthias quickly mastered German, Italian, Romanian, Latin, and principal Slavic languages, frequently acting as his father's interpreter at the reception of ambassadors. His military training proceeded under the eye of his father, whom...

    Early rule

    Thus, on January 20, 1458, Matthias was elected king by the Diet. At this time Matthias was still a hostage of George of Podebrady, who released him under the condition of marrying his daughter Kunhuta (later know as Catherine). On January 24, 1458, 40,000 Hungarian noblemen, assembled on the ice of the frozen Danube, unanimously elected Matthias Hunyadi king of Hungary, and on February 14, the new king made his state entry into Buda. Matthias was 15 when he was elected King of Hungary: At th...

    Wars in central Europe

    Matthias gained independence of and power over the barons by dividing them, and by raising a large royal army, fekete sereg (the King's Black Army of Hungary of mercenaries), whose main force included the remnants of the Hussites from Bohemia. At this time, Hungary reached its greatest territorial extent of the epoch (present-day southeastern Germany to the west, Dalmatia to the south, Eastern Carpathians to the east, and Polandto the north). Soon after his coronation, Matthias turned his att...

    Governance

    Matthias introduced a series of reforms designed to improve internal stability. He abolished tax privileges for large landowners, strengthened the power of the lesser aristocracy to curb that of the barons and commissioned a codification of the legal system. Internally, he relied on diplomacy and negotiation to achieve his goals. He further developed the standing army, an innovation introduced by his father which may in part have imitated the Janissariesagainst whom they fought.

    In the course of his expansion, Matthias strengthened his state's diplomacy. Apart from his regular network of relations with his neighbors, as well as the Pope and Kingdom of Naples, he established regular contacts with France, Burgundy, Switzerland, Florence, most German states, Russia and, occasionally, with Persia and Egypt. Matthias's empire collapsed after his death, since he had no children except for an illegitimate son, János Corvinus, whom the noblemen of the country did not accept as their king. The weak king of Bohemia, Ladislaus II of the Polish/Lithuanian Jagiellon line, followed him—Ladislaus nominally ruled the areas Matthias conquered except Austria—but real power was in the hand of the nobles. In 1514, two years before Ladislaus's death, the nobility crushed the peasant rebellion of György Dózsa with ruthless methods. As central rule degenerated, the stage was set for a defeat at the hands of the Ottoman Empire. In 1521, Belgradefell, and, in 1526, the Hungarian ar...

    Corvinus, Matthias. 1994. Matthias Corvinus and the Humanism in Central Europe. Budapest: Balassi Kiadó. ISBN 9789637873720.
    Feuer-Tóth, Rózsa. 1990. Art and Humanism in Hungary in the Age of Matthais Corvinus. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó. ISBN 9789630556460.
    Sugar, Peter F., Péter Hanák, and Tibor Frank. 1990. A History of Hungary. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. ISBN 9780253355782.
    Tanner, Marcus. 2008. The Raven King: Matthias Corvinus and the Fate of His Lost Library. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. ISBN 9780300120349.

    All links retrieved September 4, 2018. 1. The Squash and the Colt, a folk tale reflecting Matthias' wisdom and sense of justice. 2. Bibliotheca Corviniana Digitalis - National Széchényi Library, Hungary.

  5. Matthias I | king of Hungary | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › biography › Matthias-I

    Apr 02, 2021 · Matthias I, byname Matthias Corvinus, Hungarian Mátyás Corvin, original name Mátyás Hunyadi, (born Feb. 24, 1443, Kolozsvár, Transylvania [now Cluj, Romania]—died April 6, 1490, Vienna), king of Hungary (1458–90), who attempted to reconstruct the Hungarian state after decades of feudal anarchy, chiefly by means of financial, military, judiciary, and administrative reforms.

  6. Matthias Corvinus | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Matthias_Corvinus
    • Names in Other Languages
    • Early Life
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    Medieval Latin: Mattias Corvinus, Romanian: Matia/Matei/Mateiaş Corvin/Corvinul, Croatian: Matija/Matijaš Korvin, Czech: Matyáš Korvín, German: Matthias Corvinus, Italian: Mattia Corvino, Polish: Maciej Korwin, Rusyn:Матяш Корвiн/Matiash Corvin, Serbian: Матија Корвин/Matija Korvin, Slovak: Matej Korvín, Slovene: Matija Korvin, Russian: Матьяш Корвин/Matyash Korvin, Ukrainian: Матвій Корвін.

    Matthias was born in Kolozsvár (Kingdom of Hungary, now Cluj-Napoca, Romania) in a house now known as the Matthias Corvinus House. He was second son of John Hunyadi, a successful general of the Kingdom of Hungary, who had risen through the ranks of the nobility to become regent of Hungary. Matthias' mother was Erzsébet Szilágyi, from a Hungariannoble family. His tutors were the learned János Vitéz, bishop of Várad (now: Oradea), whom he subsequently raised to the primacy, and the Polish humanist Gregory of Sanok. Besides the learned languages, he was acquainted with most of the living tongues of Europe of the time. His military training proceeded under the eye of his father, whom he began to follow on his campaigns when he was only twelve years old. In 1453 he was created count of Beszterce (Bistriţa) in Transylvania, and was knighted at the Siege of Belgradein 1456. The same care for his welfare led his father to choose him a bride from the powerful family of the Counts of Cilli. M...

    Early rule

    This was the first time in the medieval Hungarian kingdom that a member of the nobility, without dynastic ancestry and relationship, mounted the royal throne. Such an election upset the usual course of dynastic succession in the age. In the Bohemian and Hungarian states they heralded a new judiciary era in Europe, characterized by the absolute supremacy of the Parliament, (dietal system) and a tendency to centralization. During his reign, Matthias reduced the power of the feudal lords, and ru...

    Wars in central Europe

    Matthias gained independence of and power over the barons by dividing them, and by raising a large royal army, fekete sereg (the King's Black Army of mercenaries), whose main force included the remnants of the Hussites from Bohemia. At this time Hungary reached its greatest territorial extent of the epoch (present-day southeastern Germany to the west, Dalmatia to the south, Eastern Carpathiansto the east, and southwestern Poland to the north). Soon after his coronation, Matthias turned his at...

    Wars against the Ottoman Empire

    In 1471 Matthias renewed the Serbian Despotate in south Hungary under Vuk Grgurević for the protection of the borders against the Ottomans. In 1479 a huge Ottoman army, on its return home from ravaging Transylvania, was annihilated at Szászváros (modern Orăştie, 13 October 1479) in the so-called Battle of Breadfield. The following year Matthias recaptured Jajce, drove the Ottomans from northern Serbia and instituted two new military banats, Jajce and Srebernik, out from reconquered Bosnian te...

    See also: History of Buda Castle and Visegrád Matthias was educated in Italian, and his fascination with the achievements of the Italian Renaissance led to the promotion of Italian cultural influences in Hungary. Buda, Esztergom, Székesfehérvár and Visegrád were amongst the towns in Hungary that benefited from the establishment of public health and education institutions and a new legal system under Matthias' rule. In 1465, he founded a university in Pressburg (Bratislava), the Universitas Istropolitanawhich was the third university in medieval Hungary. His 1476 marriage to Beatrice, the daughter of the King of Naples, only intensified the influence of the Renaissance. During the long reign of emperor Sigismund of Luxemburg, the so-called Fresh Palace of the Royal residence of Buda became probably the largest Gothic palace of the late Middle Ages. Matthias rebuilt the palace in early Renaissance style and further expanded it. His other favourite residence was the summer palace of Vi...

    In the course of his expansion, Matthias strengthened his state's diplomacy. Apart from his regular network of relations with his neighbours, as well as the Pope and Kingdom of Naples, he established regular contacts with France, Burgundy, Switzerland, Florence, most German states, Russia and, occasionally, with Persia and Egypt. Matthias's empire collapsed after his death, since he had no children except for an illegitimate son, John Corvinus, whom the noblemen of the country did not accept as their king. Matthias' rival as King of Bohemia, Ladislaus II of the Jagiellonline, followed him. High taxes, mostly falling on peasants, to sustain Matthias' lavish lifestyle and the Black Army (cumulated with the fact that the latter went on marauding across the Kingdom after being disbanded upon Matthias's death) could imply that he was not very popular with his contemporaries[citation needed]. But the fact that he was elected king in a small anti-Habsburg popular revolution, that he kept t...

    His titles in the 1486 laws: King of Hungary, Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Rama, Serbia, Lodomeria, Cumania and Bulgaria, Prince of Silesia and Luxembourg, Margrave of Moravia and Lusatia.

    Christian Gastgeber – Ekaterini Mitsiou – Ioan Aurel Pop – Mihailo Popović – Johannes Preiser-Kapeller – Alexandru Simon (Hrsg.): Matthias Corvinus und seine Zeit. Europa am Übergang vom Mittelalte...

  7. CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Matthias Corvinus

    www.newadvent.org › cathen › 10066b

    King of Hungary, son of Janos Hunyady and Elizabeth Szilagyi of Horogssey, was born at Kolozsvar 23 Feb., 1440; d. at Vienna, 6 April, 1490. In the house of his father he received along with his brother Ladislaus, a careful education under the supervision of Gregor Sanocki, who taught him the humanities.

  8. Soldiers: Matthias Corvinus - Warfare History Network

    warfarehistorynetwork.com › 2020/02/16 › soldiers

    Feb 16, 2020 · Hungarian King Matthias Corvinus. Matthias, who was Hunyadi’s second son, was born on February 23, 1443, in Cluj in the principality of Transylvania. He began fighting alongside his father at the young age of 12 and was exposed to the ferocity of the Ottoman army during the Siege of Belgrade in July 1456.

  9. Matthias Corvinus - NNDB

    www.nndb.com › people › 385

    Matthias I Hunyadi, King of Hungary, also known as Matthias Corvinus, a surname which he received from the raven (corvus) on his escutcheon, second son of János Hunyadi and Elizabeth Szilágyi, was born at Kolozsvár, probably on the 24rd of February 1443.

  10. Matthias Corvinus (Civ6) | Civilization Wiki | Fandom

    civilization.fandom.com › wiki › Matthias_Corvinus
    • Intro
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    Mighty Matthias, your feats at arms are matched only by the depths of your knowledge. Let your mighty Black Army serve as your strong hand in the battlefield, both as sword against your enemies and as shield protecting your faithful people, and ages to come will utter your name in awe.

    Matthias Corvinus's unique agenda is Raven Banner. He often Levies unitsfrom city-states and likes leaders who do the same. His leader ability is Raven King. He gains 2 Envoys with a city-state when he Levies units from it, and Levied units receive +2 Movement and +5 Combat Strength and can be upgraded at 25% of the normal resource and Gold costs. It also allows him to produce the Black Army, a unique unit that replaces the Courser, is unlocked with Castles, and gains +3 Combat Strength for each adjacent levied unit.

    Hungary gains Production towards districts and buildings in districts directly across a River from their City Centers. This aids them in developing cities rapidly so that they can spend more time producing military units. Matthias Corvinus gets two unique Cavalry units. The Black Army upgrades into their second unique unit, the Huszár, allowing them to dominate with their powerful military for a long period of the game. Matthias Corvinus' ability towards leveraging City-States gives Hungary’s conquest extra units that help on the path towards victory. The Thermal Bath helps maintain the conquered cities by providing Amenities and preventing revolt.

    Matthias Corvinus harnessed his ambition and thirst for glory in the cause of regenerating the Hungarian crown and kingdom. A true prince of the nascent Renaissance, he was both a patron of humanists and a mighty battlefield commander. At the time of his death, the Kingdom of Hungary was the largest of Europe's kingdoms, but these gains could not be maintained and collapse followed his short and glorious life. Born in Kolozsvár (Cluj in modern Romania) as the second son of the Hungarian nobleman and commander Janos Hunyadi, Matthias inherited the family's holdings upon the death of his father and older brother, who were executed for their involvement in the assassination of an ally of Hungary's then-reigning king, Ladislaus V. But when Ladislaus himself died without heir in 1457, the Diet of Hungary elected the young Matthias to be king, marking the first time a noble had been promoted to the throne. Some nobles of Hungary and the rulers of Europe celebrated this election in the tim...

    Matthias Corvinus's diplomacy screen shows the foothills and wall surrounding Visegrád Castlein Hungary.
    Matthias Corvinus's leader ability and agenda both reference his family name, which derives from corvus(the Latin word for "raven").
    Matthias Corvinus brandishes his daggerwhen making or targeted for a declaration of war.
    Matthias Corvinus wears a laurel wreath like Trajan'son his head.

    https://civilization.com/news/entries/civilization-vi-gathering-storm-hungary-matthias-corvinus-pc-release-date-february-14-2019/

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