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  1. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maximilian_I,_Holy_Roman...

    Maximilian I was Holy Roman Emperor from 1508 until his death. He was never crowned by the Pope, as the journey to Rome was always too risky. He was instead proclaimed emperor elect by Pope Julius II at Trent, thus breaking the long tradition of requiring a Papal coronation for the adoption of the Imperial title. Maximilian was the son of Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor, and Eleanor of Portugal. He ruled jointly with his father for the last ten years of the latter's reign, from c. 1483 to his

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  2. Maximilian I | Holy Roman emperor | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Maximilian-I-Holy...

    Maximilian I, (born March 22, 1459, Wiener Neustadt, Austria—died January 12, 1519, Wels), archduke of Austria, German king, and Holy Roman emperor (1493–1519) who made his family, the Habsburgs, dominant in 16th-century Europe. He added vast lands to the traditional Austrian holdings, securing the Netherlands by his own marriage, Hungary and Bohemia by treaty and military pressure, and Spain and the Spanish empire by the marriage of his son Philip.

  3. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor | Historipedia Official Wiki ...

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org/wiki/Maximilian_I...
    • Background and Childhood
    • Reign in Burgundy and The Netherlands
    • Reign in The Holy Roman Empire
    • Tu Felix Austria Nube
    • Succession
    • Death and Legacy
    • Official Style
    • Marriages and Offspring
    • See Also
    • Bibliography

    Maximilian was born at Wiener Neustadt on 22 March 1459. His father, Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor, named him for an obscure saint who Frederick believed had once warned him of imminent peril in a dream. In his infancy, he and his parents were besieged in Vienna by Albert of Austria. One source relates that, during the siege's bleakest days, the young prince would wander about the castle garrison, begging the servants and men-at-arms for bits of bread.The young prince was an excellent hunter, his favorite hobby was the hunting for birds as a horse archer. At the time, the Dukes of Burgundy, a cadet branch of the French royal family, with their sophisticated nobility and court culture, were the rulers of substantial territories on the eastern and northern boundaries of modern-day France. The reigning duke of Burgundy, Charles the Bold, was the chief political opponent of Maximilian's father Frederick III. Frederick was concerned about Burgundy's expansive tendencies on the wester...

    Maximilian's wife had inherited the large Burgundian domains in France and the Low Countries upon her father's death in the Battle of Nancy on 5 January 1477. Already before his coronation as the King of the Romans in 1486, Maximilian decided to secure this distant and extensive Burgundian inheritance to his family, the House of Habsburg, at all costs. The Duchy of Burgundy was also claimed by the French crown under Salic Law, with Louis XI, King of France vigorously contesting the Habsburg claim to the Burgundian inheritance by means of military force. Maximilian undertook the defence of his wife's dominions from an attack by Louis XI and defeated the French forces at Guinegate, the modern Enguinegatte, on 7 August 1479. The wedding contract between Maximilian and Mary stipulated that only the children of bride and groom had a right to inherit from each, not the surviving parent. Mary tried to bypass this rule with a promise to transfer territories as a gift in case of her death, b...

    Maximilian was elected King of the Romans on 16 February 1486 in Frankfurt-am-Main at his father's initiative and crowned on 9 April 1486 in Aachen. He became emperor of the Holy Roman Empireupon the death of his father in 1493. Much of Austria was under Hungarian rule when he took power, as they had occupied the territory under the reign of Frederick. In 1490, Maximilian reconquered the territory and entered Vienna.

    As part of the Treaty of Arras, Maximilian betrothed his three-year-old daughter Margaret to the Dauphin of France (later Charles VIII), son of his adversary Louis XI. Under the terms of Margaret's betrothal, she was sent to Louis to be brought up under his guardianship. Despite Louis's death in 1483, shortly after Margaret arrived in France, she remained at the French court. The Dauphin, now Charles VIII, was still a minor, and his regent until 1491 was his sister Anne. Dying shortly after signing the Treaty of Le Verger, Francis II, Duke of Brittany, left his realm to his daughter Anne. In her search of alliances to protect her domain from neighboring interests, she betrothed Maximilian I in 1490. About a year later, they married by proxy. However, Charles and his sister wanted her inheritance for France. So, when the former came of age in 1491, and taking advantage of Maximilian and his father's interest in the succession of their adversary Mathias Corvinus, King of Hungary,Charl...

    Maximilian's policies in Italy had been unsuccessful, and after 1517 Venice reconquered the last pieces of their territory. Maximilian began to focus entirely on the question of his succession. His goal was to secure the throne for a member of his house and prevent Francis I of France from gaining the throne; the resulting "election campaign" was unprecedented due to the massive use of bribery.[citation needed] The Fugger family provided Maximilian a credit of one million gulden, which was used to bribe the prince-electors.[citation needed] However, the bribery claims have been challenged.At first, this policy seemed successful, and Maximilian managed to secure the votes from Mainz, Cologne, Brandenburg and Bohemia for his grandson Charles V. The death of Maximilian in 1519 seemed to put the succession at risk, but in a few months the election of Charles V was secured.

    In 1501, Maximilian fell from his horse and badly injured his leg, causing him pain for the rest of his life. Some historians have suggested that Maximilian was "morbidly" depressed: from 1514, he travelled everywhere with his coffin. Maximilian died in Wels, Upper Austria, and was succeeded as Emperor by his grandson Charles V, his son Philip the Handsome having died in 1506. For penitential reasons, Maximilian gave very specific instructions for the treatment of his body after death. He wanted his hair to be cut off and his teeth knocked out, and the body was to be whipped and covered with lime and ash, wrapped in linen, and "publicly displayed to show the perishableness of all earthly glory". Although he is buried in the Castle Chapel at Wiener Neustadt, an extremely elaborate cenotaph tomb for Maximilian is in the Hofkirche, Innsbruck, where the tomb is surrounded by statues of heroes from the past.Much of the work was done in his lifetime, but it was not completed until decades...

    Maximilian I, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King of Germany, of Hungary, Dalmatia, Croatia, etc. Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, Brabant, Lorraine, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Limburg, Luxembourg, Gelderland, Landgrave of Alsace, Prince of Swabia, Count Palatine of Burgundy, Princely Count of Habsburg, Hainaut, Flanders, Tyrol, Gorizia, Artois, Holland, Seeland, Ferrette, Kyburg, Namur, Zutphen, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire, the Enns, Burgau, Lord of Frisia, the Wendish March, Pordenone, Salins, Mechelen, etc. etc.[citation needed]

    Maximilian was married three times, but only the first marriage produced offspring: 1. Mary of Burgundy (1457–1482). They were married in Ghenton 18 August 1477, and the marriage was ended by Mary's death in a riding accident in 1482. The marriage produced three children: 1. Philip I of Castile (1478–1506) who inherited his mother's domains following her death, but predeceased his father. He married Joanna of Castile, becoming King-consort of Castile upon her accession in 1504, and was the father of the Holy Roman Emperors Charles V and Ferdinand I 2. Margaret of Austria (1480–1533), who was first engaged at the age of 2 to the French Dauphin (who became Charles VIII of France a year later) to confirm peace between France and Burgundy. She was sent back to her father in 1492 after Charles repudiated their betrothal to marry Anne of Brittany. She was then married to the Crown Prince of Castile and Aragon John, Prince of Asturias, and after his death to Philibert II of Savoy, after wh...

    Family tree of the German monarchs. He was related to every other king of Germany.
    First Congress of Vienna- The First Congress of Vienna was held in 1515, attended by the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, and the Jagiellonian brothers, Vladislaus II, King of Hungary and King of...
    Landsknecht- The German Landsknechts, sometimes also rendered as Landsknechte were colorful mercenary soldiers with a formidable reputation, who became an important military force through late 15th...
    Hermann Wiesflecker: Kaiser Maximilian I.5 vols. Munich 1971–1986.
    Manfred Hollegger: Maximilian I., 1459–1519, Herrscher und Mensch einer Zeitenwende.Stuttgart 2005.
    Larry Silver, Marketing Maximilian: The Visual Ideology of a Holy Roman Emperor(Princeton / Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2008).
    • Wiener Neustadt, Austria
    • Habsburg
    • 12 January 1519 (aged 59) Wels, Upper Austria
    • Eleanor of Portugal
  4. Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I - 1493-1519

    www.holyromanempireassociation.com/holy-roman-emperor...

    Maximilian I (22 March 1459 – 12 January 1519) was King of the Romans (also known as King of the Germans) from 1486 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1493 until his death, though he was never crowned by the Pope, as the journey to Rome was always too risky. He was the son of Frederick III, Holy Roman Emperor, and Eleanor of Portugal.

  5. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor Biography - Childhood, Life ...

    www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/maximilian-i...

    Maximilian I was the King of Romans who served as the Holy Roman Emperor from 1508 until his death in 1519. He was the first to be the Elected Roman Emperor and not crowned, as the journey to Rome proved to be a risky affair.

  6. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor — Wikipedia Republished ...

    wiki2.org/en/Maximilian_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Background and Childhood
    • Reign in Burgundy and The Netherlands
    • Reign in The Holy Roman Empire
    • Tu Felix Austria Nube
    • Succession
    • Death and Legacy
    • Official Style
    • Marriages and Offspring
    • See Also
    • Bibliography

    Max­i­m­il­ian was born at Wiener Neustadt on 22 March 1459. His fa­ther, Fred­er­ick III, Holy Roman Em­peror, named him for an ob­scure saint who Fred­er­ick be­lieved had once warned him of im­mi­nent peril in a dream. In his in­fancy, he and his par­ents were be­sieged in Vi­enna by Al­bert of Aus­tria. One source re­lates that, dur­ing the siege's bleak­est days, the young prince would wan­der about the cas­tle gar­ri­son, beg­ging the ser­vants and men-at-arms for bits of bread.The young prince was an ex­cel­lent hunter, his fa­vorite hobby was the hunt­ing for birds as a horse archer. At the time, the Dukes of Bur­gundy, a cadet branch of the French royal fam­ily, with their so­phis­ti­cated no­bil­ity and court cul­ture, were the rulers of sub­stan­tial ter­ri­to­ries on the east­ern and north­ern bound­aries of mod­ern-day France. The reign­ing duke of Bur­gundy, Charles the Bold, was the chief po­lit­i­cal op­po­nent of Max­i­m­il­ian's fa­ther Fred­er­ick III. Fred­er­ick...

    Max­i­m­il­ian's wife had in­her­ited the large Bur­gun­dian do­mains in France and the Low Coun­tries upon her fa­ther's death in the Bat­tle of Nancy on 5 Jan­u­ary 1477. Al­ready be­fore his coro­na­tion as the King of the Ro­mans in 1486, Max­i­m­il­ian de­cided to se­cure this dis­tant and ex­ten­sive Bur­gun­dian in­her­i­tance to his fam­ily, the House of Hab­s­burg, at all costs. The Duchy of Bur­gundy was also claimed by the French crown under Salic Law, with Louis XI, King of France vig­or­ously con­test­ing the Hab­s­burg claim to the Bur­gun­dian in­her­i­tance by means of mil­i­tary force. Max­i­m­il­ian un­der­took the de­fence of his wife's do­min­ions from an at­tack by Louis XI and de­feated the French forces at Guinegate, the mod­ern En­guinegatte, on 7 Au­gust 1479. The wed­ding con­tract be­tween Max­i­m­il­ian and Mary stip­u­lated that only the chil­dren of bride and groom had a right to in­herit from each, not the sur­viv­ing par­ent. Mary tried to by­pass thi...

    Max­i­m­il­ian was elected King of the Ro­mans on 16 Feb­ru­ary 1486 in Frank­furt-am-Main at his fa­ther's ini­tia­tive and crowned on 9 April 1486 in Aachen. He be­came em­peror of the Holy Roman Em­pireupon the death of his fa­ther in 1493. Much of Aus­tria was under Hun­gar­ian rule when he took power, as they had oc­cu­pied the ter­ri­tory under the reign of Fred­er­ick. In 1490, Max­i­m­il­ian re­con­quered the ter­ri­tory and en­tered Vi­enna.

    As part of the Treaty of Arras, Max­i­m­il­ian be­trothed his three-year-old daugh­ter Mar­garet to the Dauphin of France (later Charles VIII), son of his ad­ver­sary Louis XI. Under the terms of Mar­garet's be­trothal, she was sent to Louis to be brought up under his guardian­ship. De­spite Louis's death in 1483, shortly after Mar­garet ar­rived in France, she re­mained at the French court. The Dauphin, now Charles VIII, was still a minor, and his re­gent until 1491 was his sis­ter Anne. Dying shortly after sign­ing the Treaty of Le Verger, Fran­cis II, Duke of Brit­tany, left his realm to his daugh­ter Anne. In her search of al­liances to pro­tect her do­main from neigh­bor­ing in­ter­ests, she be­trothed Max­i­m­il­ian I in 1490. About a year later, they mar­ried by proxy. How­ever, Charles and his sis­ter wanted her in­her­i­tance for France. So, when the for­mer came of age in 1491, and tak­ing ad­van­tage of Max­i­m­il­ian and his fa­ther's in­ter­est in the suc­ces­sion of th...

    Max­i­m­il­ian's poli­cies in Italy had been un­suc­cess­ful, and after 1517 Venice re­con­quered the last pieces of their ter­ri­tory. Max­i­m­il­ian began to focus en­tirely on the ques­tion of his suc­ces­sion. His goal was to se­cure the throne for a mem­ber of his house and pre­vent Fran­cis I of France from gain­ing the throne; the re­sult­ing "elec­tion cam­paign" was un­prece­dented due to the mas­sive use of bribery.[citation needed] The Fug­ger fam­ily pro­vided Max­i­m­il­ian a credit of one mil­lion gulden, which was used to bribe the prince-electors.[citation needed] How­ever, the bribery claims have been challenged.At first, this pol­icy seemed suc­cess­ful, and Max­i­m­il­ian man­aged to se­cure the votes from Mainz, Cologne, Bran­den­burg and Bo­hemia for his grand­son Charles V. The death of Max­i­m­il­ian in 1519 seemed to put the suc­ces­sion at risk, but in a few months the elec­tion of Charles V was secured.

    In 1501, Max­i­m­il­ian fell from his horse and badly in­jured his leg, caus­ing him pain for the rest of his life. Some his­to­ri­ans have sug­gested that Max­i­m­il­ian was "mor­bidly" de­pressed: From 1514, he trav­elled every­where with his coffin. Max­i­m­il­ian died in Wels, Upper Aus­tria, and was suc­ceeded as Em­peror by his grand­son Charles V, his son Philip the Hand­some hav­ing died in 1506. For pen­i­ten­tial rea­sons, Max­i­m­il­ian gave very spe­cific in­struc­tions for the treat­ment of his body after death. He wanted his hair to be cut off and his teeth knocked out, and the body was to be whipped and cov­ered with lime and ash, wrapped in linen, and "pub­licly dis­played to show the per­ish­able­ness of all earthly glory". Al­though he is buried in the Cas­tle Chapel at Wiener Neustadt, an ex­tremely elab­o­rate ceno­taph tomb for Max­i­m­il­ian is in the Hofkirche, Inns­bruck, where the tomb is sur­rounded by stat­ues of he­roes from the past.Much of the work was...

    Max­i­m­il­ian I, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Em­peror, for­ever Au­gust, King of Ger­many, of Hun­gary, Dal­ma­tia, Croa­tia, etc. Arch­duke of Aus­tria, Duke of Bur­gundy, Bra­bant, Lor­raine, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Lim­burg, Lux­em­bourg, Gelder­land, Land­grave of Al­sace, Prince of Swabia, Count Pala­tine of Bur­gundy, Princely Count of Hab­s­burg, Hain­aut, Flan­ders, Tyrol, Go­rizia, Ar­tois, Hol­land, See­land, Fer­rette, Ky­burg, Namur, Zut­phen, Mar­grave of the Holy Roman Em­pire, the Enns, Bur­gau, Lord of Frisia, the Wendish March, Por­de­none, Salins, Meche­len, etc. etc.[citation needed]

    Max­i­m­il­ian was mar­ried three times, but only the first mar­riage pro­duced off­spring: 1. Mary of Burgundy (1457–1482). They were married in Ghenton 18 August 1477, and the marriage was ended by Mary's death in a riding accident in 1482. The marriage produced three children: 1. Philip I of Castile (1478–1506) who inherited his mother's domains following her death, but predeceased his father. He married Joanna of Castile, becoming King-consort of Castile upon her accession in 1504, and was the father of the Holy Roman Emperors Charles V and Ferdinand I 2. Margaret of Austria (1480–1533), who was first engaged at the age of 2 to the French Dauphin (who became Charles VIII of France a year later) to confirm peace between France and Burgundy. She was sent back to her father in 1492 after Charles repudiated their betrothal to marry Anne of Brittany. She was then married to the Crown Prince of Castile and Aragon John, Prince of Asturias, and after his death to Philibert II of Savoy,...

    Hermann Wiesflecker: Kaiser Maximilian I.5 vols. Munich 1971–1986.
    Manfred Hollegger: Maximilian I., 1459–1519, Herrscher und Mensch einer Zeitenwende.Stuttgart 2005.
    Larry Silver, Marketing Maximilian: The Visual Ideology of a Holy Roman Emperor(Princeton / Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2008).
  7. Amazon.com: Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor (9780548165645 ...

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    Maximilian I, Holy Roman ... has been added to your Cart Add to Cart. Buy Now More Buying Choices 2 new from $36.95 1 used from $10.95. 3 used & new from $10.95.

  8. Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor | Project Gutenberg Self ...

    self.gutenberg.org/articles/Maximilian_I,_Holy_Roman_Emperor
    • Background and Childhood
    • Reign in Burgundy and The Netherlands
    • Reign in The Holy Roman Empire
    • Tu Felix Austria Nube
    • Succession
    • Death and Legacy
    • Official Style
    • Marriages and Offspring
    • See Also
    • Bibliography

    Maximilian was born at Wiener Neustadt on 22 March 1459. His father, Frederick III, named him for an obscure saintwhom Frederick believed had once warned him of imminent peril in a dream. In his infancy, he and his parents were besieged in Vienna by Albert of Austria. One source relates that, during the siege's bleakest days, the young prince would wander about the castle garrison, begging the servants and men-at-arms for bits of bread . At the time, the Dukes of Burgundy, a cadet branch of the French royal family, with their sophisticated nobility and court culture, were the rulers of substantial territories on the eastern and northern boundaries of modern-day France. The reigning duke of Burgundy, Charles the Bold, was the chief political opponent of Maximilian's father Frederick III. Frederick was concerned about Burgundy's expansive tendencies on the western border of his Holy Roman Empire and, to forestall military conflict, he attempted to secure the marriage of Charles's only...

    Maximilian's wife had inherited the large Burgundian domains in France and the Low Countries upon her father's death in the Battle of Nancy on 5 January 1477. Already before his coronation as the King of the Romans in 1486, Maximilian decided to secure this distant and extensive Burgundian inheritance to his family, the House of Habsburg, at all costs. The Duchy of Burgundy was also claimed by the French crown under Salic Law, with Louis XI, King of France vigorously contesting the Habsburg claim to the Burgundian inheritance by means of military force. Maximilian undertook the defence of his wife's dominions from an attack by Louis XI and defeated the French forces at Guinegate, the modern Enguinegatte, on 7 August 1479. The wedding contract between Maximilian and Mary stipulated that only the children of bride and groom had a right to inherit from each, not the surviving parent. Mary tried to bypass this rule with a promise to transfer territories as a gift in case of her death, b...

    Elected King of the Romans 16 February 1486 in Frankfurt-am-Main at his father's initiative and crowned on 9 April 1486 in Aachen, Maximilian also stood at the head of the Holy Roman Empireupon his father's death in 1493.

    As part of the Treaty of Arras, Maximilian betrothed his three-year-old daughter Margaret to the Dauphin of France (later Charles VIII), son of his adversary Louis XI. Under the terms of Margaret's betrothal, she was sent to Louis to be brought up under his guardianship. Despite Louis's death in 1483, shortly after Margaret arrived in France, she remained at the French court. The Dauphin, now Charles VIII, was still a minor, and his regent until 1491 was his sister Anne. Dying shortly after signing the Treaty of Le Verger, Francis II, Duke of Brittany, left his realm to his daughter Anne. In her search of alliances to protect her domain from neighboring interests, she betrothed Maximilian I in 1490. About a year later, they married by proxy. However, Charles and his sister wanted her inheritance for France. So, when the former came of age in 1491, and taking advantage of Maximilian and his father's interest in the succession of their adversary Mathias Corvinus, King of Hungary,Charl...

    After it became clear that Maximilian's policies in Italy had been unsuccessful, and after 1517 Venice reconquered the last pieces of their territory from Maximilian, the emperor now started to focus entirely on the question of his succession. His goal was to secure the throne for a member of his house and prevent Francis I of France from gaining the throne; the resulting "election campaign" was unprecedented due to the massive use of bribery. The Fuggerfamily provided Maximilian a credit of 1 million gulden, which was used to bribe the prince-electors. At first, this policy seemed successful, and Maximilian managed to secure the votes from Mainz, Cologne, Brandenburg and Bohemia for his grandson Charles V. The death of Maximilian in 1519 seemed to put the succession at risk, but in a few months the election of Charles V was secured.

    In 1501, Maximilian fell from his horse, an accident that badly injured his leg and caused him pain for the rest of his life. Some historians have suggested that Maximilian was "morbidly" depressed: From 1514, he travelled everywhere with his coffin. Maximilian died in Wels, Upper Austria, and was succeeded as Emperor by his grandson Charles V, his son Philip the Handsome having died in 1506. Although he is buried in the Castle Chapel at Wiener Neustadt, a cenotaph tomb for Maximilian is located in the Hofkirche, Innsbruck. Maximilian was a keen supporter of the arts and sciences, and he surrounded himself with scholars such as Joachim Vadian and Andreas Stoberl (Stiborius), promoting them to important court posts. His reign saw the first flourishing of the Renaissance in Germany. He commissioned a series of three monumental woodblock prints – The Triumphal Arch (1512–18, 192 woodcut panels, 295 cm wide and 357 cm high – approximately 9'8" by 11'8½"), and a Triumphal Procession (151...

    Maximilian I, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King of Germany, of Hungary, Dalmatia, Croatia, etc. Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, Brabant, Lorraine, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Limburg, Luxembourg, Gelderland, Landgrave of Alsace, Prince of Swabia, Count Palatine of Burgundy, Princely Count of Habsburg, Hainaut, Flanders, Tyrol, Gorizia, Artois, Holland, Seeland, Ferrette, Kyburg, Namur, Zutphen, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire, the Enns, Burgau, Lord of Frisia, the Wendish March, Pordenone, Salins, Mechelen, etc. etc.

    Maximilian was married three times, of which only the first marriage produced offspring: 1. Mary of Burgundy (1457–1482). They were married in Ghenton 18 August 1477, and the marriage was ended by Mary's death in a riding accident in 1482. The marriage produced three children: 1. Philip the Handsome (1478–1506) who inherited his mother's domains following her death, but predeceased his father. He married Joanna of Castile, becoming King-consort of Castile upon her accession in 1504, and was the father of the Holy Roman Emperors Charles V and Ferdinand I 2. Margaret of Austria, (1480–1533), who was first engaged at the age of 2 to the French Dauphin (who became Charles VIII of France a year later) to confirm peace between France and Burgundy. She was sent back to her father in 1492 after Charles repudiated their betrothal to marry Anne of Brittany. She was then married to the Crown Prince of Castile and Aragon John, Prince of Asturias, and after his death to Philibert II of Savoy, af...

    Thomas Schauerte, Die Ehrenpforte für Kaiser Maximilian I. Dürer und Altdorfer im Dienst des Herrschers(München / Berlin, 2001) (Kunstwissenschaftliche Studien, 95).
    Larry Silver, Marketing Maximilian: The Visual Ideology of a Holy Roman Emperor(Princeton / Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2008).
  9. Maximilian I - NNDB

    www.nndb.com/people/399/000096111

    Maximilian I, Holy Roman emperor, son of the emperor Frederick III and Leonora, daughter of Edward, King of Portugal, was born at Vienna Neustadt on the 22nd of March 1459.

  10. Maximilian I, 'the last knight' | Die Welt der Habsburger

    www.habsburger.net/en/persons/habsburg-emperor/...

    With his policies of war and marriage, Emperor Maximilian I laid the foundations upon which the Habsburgs rose to become a great power. His principal residence was at Innsbruck, which was expanded during his reign. In addition to extending his power base, he promoted science and the arts. He also dictated two autobiographical works which attest to his stylization of himself as the ‘last knight’.