Yahoo Web Search

  1. Mieszko the Younger - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mieszko_the_Younger

    Mieszko the Younger (also known as of Kalisz) (Polish: Mieszko Młodszy (kaliski)) (between 1160 and 1165 – 2 August 1193) was a Duke of Kalisz since 1191 until his death. He was the second child (but fourth-born son) of Mieszko III the Old , Duke of Greater Poland and since 1173 High Duke of Poland , by his second wife Eudoxia , daughter of ...

  2. Mieszko III the Old - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mieszko_III

    The first major conflict with the high duke took place during 1140–1141, when his younger half-brothers Bolesław IV the Curly and Mieszko III together with their mother but without Władysław's knowledge divided between them the lands of Łęczyca, which were held only as a wittum by Bolesław's widow Salomea for life and should revert to ...

    • c. 1126/1127
    • Cathedral of Saint Paul the Apostle, Kalisz
    • 1173–1177, 1191, 1198–1199, 1201
    • 13 March 1202 (aged 76), Kalisz
  3. Mieszko I of Poland | Historipedia Official Wiki | Fandom

    historipediaofficial.wikia.org/wiki/Mieszko_I_of...
    • Date of Birth
    • Origin and Meaning of His Name
    • His Reign
    • Organization of The Polish State
    • Accomplishments
    • Marriages and Issue
    • Bibliography
    • See Also

    There is no certain information on Mieszko I's life before he took control over his lands. Only the Lesser Poland Chronicle gives the date of his birth as somewhere between the years 920–931 (depending on the version of the manuscript), however, modern researchers don't recognize the Chronicle as a reliable source. Several historians on the basis of their investigations postulated the date of Mieszko I's birth to have been between 922–945; the activity of the Duke in his final years of life p...

    There are three major theories concerning the origin and meaning of Mieszko I's name. The most popular theory, proposed by Jan Długosz, explains that Mieszko is a diminutive of Mieczysław, a combination of two elements or lexemes: Miecz meaning sword and Sław meaning famous. Today, this theory is rejected by the majority of Polish historians, who consider the name Mieczysław to have been invented by Długosz to explain the origin of the name Mieszko. Today, we know that ancient Slavs never for...

    Mieszko I took over the tribal rule after his father's death ca. 950–960, probably closer to the latter date. Due to the lack of sources it is not possible to determine exactly which lands he inherited. Certainly among them were the areas inhabited by the Polans and Goplans, as well as the Sieradz-Łęczyca lands and Kuyavia. It is possible that this state included also Masovia and Gdańsk Pomerania. Soon the new ruler had faced the task of integrating the relatively large, ethnically and cultur...

    Template:Unreferenced sectionThe basic structure of the early Polish state was Mieszko's military force. The ruler managed to create an army composed of about 3,000 mounted warriors. Perhaps among them were the Varangians, which is indicated by archaeological findings in the vicinity of Poznań. This increasingly powerful force allowed the Polans to attack weaker neighboring tribes and conquer their lands. A key factor promoting cohesion of the growing state was fear of the invaders impressed...

    1. Unification of Polish lands. Mieszko's state was the first state that could be called Poland. He is often considered the founder, the principal creator and builder of the Polish state. 1. Acceptance of Roman Catholicism and therefore inclusion of his country in the mainstream civilization and political structures of Roman Catholic Europe. 1. Erection of churches. The Gniezno Cathedral was constructed during Mieszko's rule. Very likely the Duke also founded the church at Ostrów Tumski and...

    According to Gallus Anonymus, before becoming a Roman Catholic Mieszko had seven pagan wives, whom he had to get rid of as he married Dobrawa. Nothing is known for sure of any children from these relationships. In 965, before his baptism, Mieszko married Dobrawa (b. 940/45 – d. 977), daughter of Boleslav I the Cruel, Duke of Bohemia. They had two children: 1. Bolesław I the Brave (Chrobry) (b. 967 – d. 17 June 1025). 2. Świętosława (Sigrid) (b. 968/72 – d. ca. 1016), married first to Eric the...

    1. Jasiński K., Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Warszawa-Wrocław (1992), p. 54–70. 2. Labuda G., Mieszko I, (in) Polski Słownik Biograficzny, vol. 21, 1976. 3. Labuda G., Mieszko I, Wyd. Ossolineum, Wrocław 2002, ISBN 83-04-04619-9 4. Labuda G., Pierwsze państwo polskie, Krajowa Agencja Wydawnicza, Kraków 1989, ISBN 83-03-02969-X 5. Philip Earl Steele Nawrócenie i Chrzest Mieszka I 2005, ISBN 83-922344-8-0 6. Szczur S., Historia Polski średniowiecze, chap. 2.2.1 Państwo gnieźnieńskie Mieszka I (...

    1. Prehistory and protohistory of Poland 2. Poland in the Early Middle Ages 3. History of Poland (966–1385) 4. List of Poles

    • ca. 940
    • Piast dynasty
    • 25 May 992 Poznań, Poland
    • Siemomysł
  4. Prince Mieszko Bolesławowic, High Duke of Poland (1126 - 1202 ...

    www.geni.com/people/Mieszko-III-the-Old-High...

    In 1173 Mieszko was promoted to the throne of Kraków and became High Duke of Poland (Latin: dux maximus, dux totius Poloniae); but he was soon expelled from Kraków by his younger brother, Casimir II, and from Greater Poland by his son. Mieszko III never abdicated his rights or ambitions, and returned to Kraków four times before he died in 1202.

  5. mieszko iii the old : definition of mieszko iii the old and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/mieszko iii the old/en-en

    By 1154, Mieszko married secondly with Eudoxia (b. ca. 1131 – d. aft. 1187), daughter of Grand Prince Izjaslav II of Kiev. [3] They had five children: Bolesław (b. 1159 – killed in the Battle of Mozgawą, 13 September 1195). Mieszko the Younger (b. ca. 1160/65 – d. 2 August 1193). Władysław III Spindleshanks (b. ca. 1161/67 – d. 3 ...

  6. Mieszko of Poland, I (c.930 - 992) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com/people/Mieszko-of-Poland-I/...

    Wichmann the Younger, a Saxon nobleman who was then a leader of a band of Polabian Slavs, defeated Mieszko twice, and around 963 a brother of Mieszko, whose name is unknown, was killed in the fighting.

  7. Mieszko I of Poland : definition of Mieszko I of Poland and ...

    dictionary.sensagent.com/Mieszko I of Poland/en-en
    • Date of Birth
    • Origin and Meaning of His Name
    • His Reign
    • Organization of The Polish State
    • Accomplishments
    • Marriages and Issue
    • Bibliography
    • See Also

    There is no certain information on Mieszko I's life before he took control over his lands. Only the Lesser Poland Chronicle gives the date of his birth as somewhere between the years 920–931 (depending on the version of the manuscript), however, modern researchers don't recognize the Chronicle as a reliable source. Several historians on the basis of their investigations postulated the date of Mieszko I's birth to have been between 922–945;[4] the activity of the Duke in his final years of life puts the date of his birth closer to the latter year.[5]

    There are three major theories concerning the origin and meaning of Mieszko I's name. The most popular theory, proposed by Jan Długosz, explains that Mieszko is a diminutive of Mieczysław, a combination of two elements or lexemes: Miecz meaning sword and Sław meaning famous. Today, this theory is rejected by the majority of Polish historians, who consider the name Mieczysław to have been invented by Długosz to explain the origin of the name Mieszko. Today, we know that ancient Slavs never formed their names using either animal names or weapon names. Ancient Slavic names were abstract in nature. The same explanation rules out another theory about the origin of the name Mieszko, which links the name with the Polish word miś/miśko meaning bear, as no animal names were used to form honorable Polish names among Polish nobility.[6] The second most popular theory about the origin and sense of Mieszko's name can be traced to the very old legend, firstly described by Gallus Anonymus, accordi...

    Early reign

    Mieszko I took over the tribal rule after his father's death ca. 950–960, probably closer to the latter date.[9] Due to the lack of sources it is not possible to determine exactly which lands he inherited. Certainly among them were the areas inhabited by the Polans and Goplans,[10] as well as the Sieradz-Łęczyca lands and Kuyavia.[11] It is possible that this state included also Masovia[12] and Gdańsk Pomerania.[13] Soon the new ruler had faced the task of integrating the relatively large, et...

    Margrave Gero's war; Mieszko's homage to the Emperor

    The chronicle of Thietmar poses some problems of interpretation of the information regarding the attack of Margrave Gero on the Slavic tribes, as a result of which he purportedly subordinated to the authority of the Emperor Lusatia and the Selpuli (meaning the Słupian tribes) and also Mieszko with his subjects. According to the majority of modern historians,[17] Thietmar made an error summarizing the chronicle of Widukind, placing the Gero raid there instead of the fighting that Mieszko condu...

    Marriage and conversion to Christianity

    Probably in 964 Mieszko began negotiations with the Bohemian ruler Boleslav I the Cruel. As a result, in 965 Mieszko I married his daughter Dobrawa (also named Dobrava, Doubravka or Dąbrówka).[21] The initiative of the alliance is likely to have come from the Polish ruler. It is probable that the marriage was officially arranged in February 965.[22] The next step was the baptism of Mieszko. There are different hypotheses concerning this event. Most often it is assumed that it was a political...

    The basic structure of the early Polish state was Mieszko's military force. The ruler managed to create an army composed of about 3,000 mounted warriors. Perhaps among them were the Varangians, which is indicated by archaeological findings in the vicinity of Poznań. This increasingly powerful force allowed the Polans to attack weaker neighboring tribes and conquer their lands. A key factor promoting cohesion of the growing state was fear of the invaders impressed by them among local populations. The first Piasts reinforced their rule by burning local strongholds and replacing them with new larger fortresses, located in strategic positions. Archaeological studies show that this practice was abandoned only at the end of Mieszko's reign, when his position was already well-established. The largest social group in Mieszko's state were free peasants (kmiecie), who cultivated their own land. They had to support the state by levies collected from them and by supporting the duke and his atte...

    Unification of Polish lands. Mieszko's state was the first state that could be called Poland. He is often considered the founder, the principal creator and builder of the Polish state.[69]

    According to Gallus Anonymus, before becoming a Christian Mieszko had seven pagan wives, whom he had to get rid of as he married Dobrawa. Nothing is known for sure of any children from these relationships.[73] Some sources show the possibility that Adelajda or Adleta (b. 950/60 – d. aft. 997), first wife of Duke Mihály of Gran (Esztergom) and then wife of her brother-in-law Géza, Grand Prince of the Magyars, was Mieszko's daughter (born from a chronological point of view from one of the pagan wives) and not his sister as is given in the majority of web sources.[1][74] In 965, before his baptism, Mieszko married Dobrawa (b. 940/45 – d. 977), daughter of Boleslav I the Cruel, Duke of Bohemia. They had two children: 1. Bolesław I the Brave (Chrobry)(b. 967 – d. 17 June 1025). 2. Świętosława (Sigrid) (b. 968/72 – d. ca. 1016), married first to Eric the Victorious, King of Sweden and later to Sweyn Forkbeard, King of Denmark. From her second marriage, she probably was the mother of Cnut...

    Jasiński K., Rodowód pierwszych Piastów, Warszawa-Wrocław (1992), p. 54–70.
    Labuda G., Mieszko I, (in) Polski Słownik Biograficzny, vol. 21, 1976.
    Labuda G., Mieszko I, Wyd. Ossolineum, Wrocław 2002, ISBN 83-04-04619-9
    Labuda G., Pierwsze państwo polskie, Krajowa Agencja Wydawnicza, Kraków 1989, ISBN 83-03-02969-X
  8. Mieszko III the Old of Poland (c1126-1202) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Mieszko_III_the_Old...

    Mieszko III the Old Piast of Poland, Duke of Greater Poland, High Duke of Poland, was born circa1126 to Bolesław III Wrymouth of Poland (1086-1138) and Salomea von Berg-Schelklingen (c1099-1144) and died 13 March 1202 of unspecified causes. He married Elisabeth of Hungary (c1129-bef1155) circa1136 JL . He married Evdokiya Izyaslavna of Kiev (c1136-c1187) 1154 JL . Notable ancestors ...

  9. Mieszko I of Poland - Timenote

    timenote.info/en/Mieszko-I-I-of-Poland

    Mieszko I (ca. 940 – 25 May 992), was the ruler of the Polans from about 960 until his death. A member of the Piast dynasty, he was son of Siemomysł; grandchild of Lestek; father of Bolesław I the Brave, the first crowned King of Poland; likely father of Świętosława (Sigrid), a Nordic Queen; and grandfather of her son, Cnut the Great.

  10. Mieszko II Lambert of Poland (c990-1034) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Mieszko_II_Lambert_of...
    • Life
    • Marriage and Issue
    • Notes
    • Footnotes

    Early years

    Since Mieszko II was politically active before his father's death, Bolesław I appointed him as his successor. He participated mainly in German politics, both as a representative of his father and the commander of the Polish troops. In 1013 Mieszko II went to Magdeburg, where he paid homage to the Emperor Henry II. A few months later Bolesław I paid homage in person. The real purpose of Mieszko's visit is unclear, especially since soon after his father paid homage to the Holy Roman Empire. Pre...

    In Merseburg ca. 1013, Mieszko II married with Richeza (b. bef. 1000 – d. Saalfeld, 21 March 1063), daughter of Count Palatine Ezzo of Lotharingia. They had at least three children, and possibly four: 1. Ryksa (b. 22 September 1013 – d. 21 May 1075), married by 1039/42 to King Béla I of Hungary. 2. Casimir I the Restorer(b. 25 July 1016 – d. 19 March 1058). 3. Gertruda (b. 1025 – d. Kiev, 4 January 1108), married by 1043 to Grand Prince Iziaslav I of Kiev. 4. possibly Agatha, wife of Edward the Exile, whose origins are unknown. One theory that has been put forward is that she was daughter of Mieszko II and Richeza.

    ^ The Catholic Church in Poland: Saints. Quote: "Blessed Rycheza (Ryksa) (+1063), Queen, wife of [the] King Mieszko II [21.5]"
    ^ In the literature appears different dates of this conquest: 1017 (Norman Davies, Boże igrzysko, t. I, Wydawnictwo ZNAK, Kraków 1987, ISBN 83-7006-052-8), 1019 (this date is supported virtually al...

    Warning:Default sort key "Mieszko II Lambert" overrides earlier default sort key "Piast, Mieszko Lambert".