Yahoo Web Search

    • Monastery of Yuste - Wikipedia
      • The Monastery of Yuste is a monastery in the small village now called Cuacos de Yuste (in older works San Yuste or San Just) in the province of Cáceres in the autonomous community of Extremadura, Spain. The monastery was founded by the Hieronymite Order of monks in 1402.
      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monastery_of_Yuste
  1. People also ask

    How did the Yuste monastery get its name?

    Where is the monastery in Cuacos de Yuste?

    How is the monastery divided into two cloisters?

  2. Monastery of Yuste - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Monastery_of_Yuste

    The Monastery of Yuste is a monastery in the small village now called Cuacos de Yuste (in older works San Yuste or San Just) in the province of Cáceres in the autonomous community of Extremadura, Spain. The monastery was founded by the Hieronymite Order of monks in 1402.

  3. The place chosen as his retreat is the Monastery of Yuste, in Extremadura. Carlos V built a residential palace annexed to the Monastery, decorated with tapestries and paintings by Titian.

  4. Yuste Monastery (Cáceres). Renaissance. Information | spain ...

    www.spain.info › en › places-of-interest

    Yuste Monastery has its origins in a small shrine that was extended thanks to some land donated in the early 15th century. The monastery itself was founded by a group of monks in 1408. Its international fame derives from the fact that in 1557 the emperor Carlos V went there to live out his last months, after passing the crown to his son Philip II.

  5. MONASTERY | FUNDACIÓN YUSTE

    www.fundacionyuste.org › monastery

    Though the founding origins of the Saint Geronimo Royal Monastery of Yuste can be found in Plasencia and in the hermitage of San Salvador de la Sierra, situated between Cuacos and Garganta la Olla, the first construction of the complex, that we can still see today, dates back to 1402 when the owner of the land between Gilona and Vercelejo creeks (also known by the name of Yuste) gave it to the “ermitaños de la pobre vida” [hermits devoted to a life of poverty] so that they could build a ...

  6. The Monastery of Yuste can be visited from Tuesday to Sunday at different times in summer and winter. Access for visitors is through the main facade. The ticket office closes one hour before the monastery closes. The monastery will be closed every Monday of the year as well as on December 24, 25 and 31.

  7. Monasterio de Yuste - Extremadura Turismo

    www.turismoextremadura.com › Monasterio-de-Yuste

    The Royal Monastery of Yuste forms part of Spain's National Heritage and is the headquarters of the European Yuste Academic Foundation, which has the mission of fostering the spirit of union in Europe.

  8. The Monastery of Yuste is a monastery in the small village now called Cuacos de Yuste in the province of Cáceres in the autonomous community of Extremadura, Spain.

  9. The Yuste Monastery and the last trip of Emperor Charles V ...

    www.piggytraveller.com › blog › yuste-monastery-emperor
    • About Charles V
    • About The Monastery
    • What to Do Before Or After The Visit

    Charles V was the most powerful man of his time. Born in Ghent in 1500 to Philip I the Handsome and Joan the Mad, he was Holy Roman emperor, king of Spain (as Charles I) and king of Germany (as Charles V). He inherited an enormous empire that extended from Spain to Austria and the Netherlands and included the Spanish America. With such a vast territory to rule no wonder he had to face many wars during his life. He fought against the French, against Protestantism, against the Ottoman Empire and faced open revolts in Spain and in his native city. In 1555, sick and afflicted by gout he abdicated in favour of his son Philip II and later retired to the Yuste Monastery, where he died in 1558. He married his own cousin Isabella of Portugal out of purely political reasons, as he was away for long periods and needed somebody to govern Castile and Aragon during his absences. Isabella died after complications with her sixth pregnancy. Charles was deeply affected by the loss and never remarried...

    The Monasterio de San Jerónimo de Yuste was originally built by locals to shelter hermits and monks and comprised a church and two cloisters. The structure of the ensemble was later modified in order to accommodate Charles V. They built a house-palace that was moderately decorated, taking into account who it was for. The church is a Late Gothic temple that also displays a few Renaissance-style elements from the 16thcentury. Its structure is pretty simple, with only one nave which leads to the Gothic cloister, a rectangular open space surrounded by an elegant arcade. The new cloister is lavishly decorated compared to the Gothic one but, unlike the Gothic cloister, this one is bigger. The columns of its arcade are Renaissance-style, decorated with volutes and garlands. It’s a nice little space with a fountain in the middle and trees, truly peaceful and quiet. The house-palace From the second cloister and via an arcade facing a garden you will arrive at the building that housed Charles...

    I would recommend getting there as early as you can to visit the place at your own pace, taking as long as you want without feeling a bit rushed. If you are staying in the area for a few days you might consider: 1. Doing the emperor Charles V walking tour.It’s a 10-km route from Jarandilla de la Vera to the Yuste Monastery. It’s part of the own route Charles V took during his last trip to the Monastery and has recently been designated (together with other Charles V European routes) European Cultural Route by the Council of Europe. 2. Visiting Garganta la Olla. The village is only 7 km away from the Monastery via the Camino Rural (CCV-913), a narrow single-track country road that will take you to Garganta la Olla via a beautiful lookout point (mirador de la serrana). Drive slowly and enjoy the views to the mountains. Location on a map © Piggy Traveller. All rights reserved.

  1. Ad
    related to: Monastery of Yuste