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  1. Nilo-Saharan languages - Simple English Wikipedia, the free ...

    simple.m.wikipedia.org › wiki › Nilo-Saharan_languages

    The Nilo-Saharan languages are a family of African languages.They are spoken by around 50 million people, who mainly live in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers. The languages go through 17 countries in the northern half of Africa: from Algeria to Benin in the west; from Libya to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the center; and from Egypt to Tanzania in the east.

  2. Category:Nilo-Saharan languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Category:Nilo-Saharan

    Pages in category "Nilo-Saharan languages" The following 8 pages are in this category, out of 8 total. This list may not reflect recent changes ( learn more ).

  3. Languages of Ethiopia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Ethiopian_languages

    Nilo-Saharan. In Ethiopia, the term "Nilotic" is often used to refer to Nilo-Saharan languages and their communities. However, in academic linguistics, "Nilotic" is only part of "Nilo-Saharan", a segment of the larger Nilo-Saharan family. Nilo-Saharan. Anuak language (also in South Sudan) Berta language; Gumuz language

  4. Nilo-Saharan languages - Wikipedia

    static.hlt.bme.hu › wiki › Nilo-Saharan_languages

    The Nilo-Saharan languages are a proposed family of African languages spoken by some 50–60 million people, mainly in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers, including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of the Nile meet.

  5. Languages of Nigeria - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Languages_of_Nigeria

    Nigeria's linguistic diversity is a microcosm of much of Africa as a whole, and the country contains languages from the three major African language families: Afroasiatic, Nilo-Saharan and Niger–Congo.

  6. Nilotic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Nilotic_languages

    Southern Nilotic languages such as Kalenjin and Datooga; Western Nilotic languages such as Luo, Nuer and Dinka; Before Greenberg's reclassification, Nilotic was used to refer to Western Nilotic alone, with the other two being grouped as related "Nilo-Hamitic" languages. Blench (2012) treats the Burun languages as a fourth subgroup of Nilotic.

  7. Languages of Eritrea - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Languages_of_Eritrea

    Nilo-Saharan languages. In addition, languages belonging to the Nilo-Saharan language family are spoken as a mother tongue by the Kunama and Nara Nilotic ethnic minorities that live in the north and northwestern part of the country.

  8. Nilo-Saharan languages - The Reader Wiki, Reader View of ...

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Nilo-Saharan

    Some other important Nilo-Saharan languages under 1 million speakers: Fur (500,000 in 1983, significantly more today). The eponymous language of Darfur Province in western Sudan. Tubu (350,000 to 400,000) One of the northernmost Nilo-Saharan languages, extending from Nigeria, Niger, and Chad into Libya.

  9. Nilo-Saharan languages - en.wikipedia-on-ipfs.org

    en.wikipedia-on-ipfs.org › wiki › Nilo-Saharan

    The Nilo-Saharan languages are a proposed family of African languages spoken by some 50–60 million Nilotic people, mainly in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers, including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of the Nile meet.

  10. Nilo-Saharan languages - Wikiwand

    www.wikiwand.com › simple › Nilo-Saharan_languages

    The Nilo-Saharan languages are a family of African languages. They are spoken by around 50 million people, who mainly live in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers. The languages go through 17 countries in the northern half of Africa: from Algeria to Benin in the west; from Libya to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in the center; and from Egypt to Tanzania in the east.

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