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  1. Pipe organ - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_organ

    5 days ago · Organ music was seldom written in the Classical era, as composers preferred the piano with its ability to create dynamics. In Germany, the six sonatas op. 65 of Felix Mendelssohn (published 1845) marked the beginning of a renewed interest in composing for the organ.

    • Organ, church organ
  2. Charles-Marie Widor - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles-Marie_Widor

    Sep 20, 2020 · The organ symphonies are his most significant contribution to the organ repertoire. It is unusual for a work written for one instrument to be assigned the term "symphony". However, Widor was at the forefront of a revival in French organ music, which utilized a new organ design pioneered by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll that was "symphonic" in style ...

    • 12 March 1937 (aged 93), Paris, France
  3. People also ask

    What kind of music was played in medieval times?

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    What type of music was used in the Renaissance?

  4. As Slow as Possible - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/As_Slow_as_Possible

    Sep 19, 2020 · Organ 2 /ASLSP (As Slow as Possible) is a musical piece by John Cage and the subject of one of the longest-lasting musical performances yet undertaken. It was originally written in 1987 for organ and is adapted from the earlier work ASLSP 1985; a typical performance of the piano version lasts 20 to 70 minutes.

  5. Theatre organ - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theatre_organ

    A theatre organ (also known as a theater organ, or [especially in the U.K.] a cinema organ) is a distinct type of pipe organ originally developed to provide music and sound effects to accompany silent films during the first 3 decades of the 20th century.

  6. Hammond organ - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B3_organ

    The Hammond Organ on '120 Years Of Electronic Music' – includes original patent diagrams for the instrument; Media "Electric Pipeless Organ Has Millions of Tones". Popular Mechanics. No. April 1936. pp. 569–571. One of the first large, detailed articles on the Hammond Organ and how it worked; Hammond Organ Seventieth (video). BBC.

    • 1935–1975 (tonewheel models), 1967–1985 (transistor models), 1986–present (digital models)
    • $1,193 (Model A, 1935), $2,745 (Model B-3, 1954)
  7. Organ Sonatas (Bach) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_Sonatas_(Bach)

    Sep 20, 2020 · Williams, Peter (2003), The Organ Music of J. S. Bach (2nd ed.), Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-89115-9 Wolff, Christoph (1994), "Bach's Leipzig Chamber Music", Bach: Essays on His Life and Work , Harvard University Press , p. 263, ISBN 0674059263 (a reprint of a 1985 publication in Early Music )

  8. Sep 05, 2020 · The organ is the most important musical instrument in church music, although from time to time many other instruments have been used as well. During many periods in history composers writing for the church used traditional music rather than the newest fashions.

  9. organ - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/organ
    • English
    • Middle English
    • Norwegian Bokmål
    • Norwegian Nynorsk
    • Polish
    • Romanian
    • Serbo-Croatian
    • Swedish

    Etymology

    From Middle English organe, from Old French organe, from Latin organum, from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon, “an instrument, implement, tool, also an organ of sense or apprehension, an organ of the body, also a musical instrument, an organ”), from Proto-Indo-European *werǵ-. Doublet of orgue.

    Pronunciation

    1. (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹ.ɡən/ 2. (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɔː.ɡən/ 3. Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)ɡən 4. Hyphenation: or‧gan

    Noun

    organ (plural organs) 1. A larger part of an organism, composed of tissues that perform similar functions.quotations ▼ 1.1. 2018, Sandeep Jauhar, Heart: a History, →ISBN, page 98: 1.1.1. No matter the extraordinary progress that has been made in heart surgery over the past century, the heart remains a vulnerable organ. 2. (by extension) A body of an organizationdedicated to the performing of certain functions. 3. (music) A musical instrument that has multiple pipes which play when a key is pr...

    Noun

    organ (plural organs) 1. Alternative form of organe

    References

    1. “organ(e (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-02.

    Etymology

    From Latin organum, a borrowing from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon),

    Noun

    organ n (definite singular organet, indefinite plural organ or organer, definite plural organa or organene) 1. (anatomy, biology) an organ 2. an organ (publication which represents an organisation) 3. a body (e.g. an advisory body)

    See also

    1. orgel (musical instrument)

    Etymology

    From Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon), via Latin organum

    Noun

    organ n (definite singular organet, indefinite plural organ, definite plural organa) 1. (anatomy, biology) an organ 2. an organ (publication which represents an organisation) 3. a body (e.g. an advisory body)

    See also

    1. orgel (musical instrument)

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈɔr.ɡan/

    Noun

    organ m inan 1. organ, part of an organism 2. (by extension)unit of government dedicated to a specific function 3. (politics) organ, official publication of a politicalorganization

    Etymology

    From Byzantine Greek ὄργανος (órganos), from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon), partly through the intermediate of Slavic *orъganъ. Some senses also based on French orgue (cf. orgă), Italian organum, Italian organo.

    Noun

    organ n (plural organe) 1. organ (part of organism) 2. (archaic) organ (musical instrument)

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ǒrɡaːn/ 2. Hyphenation: or‧gan

    Noun

    òrgān m (Cyrillic spelling о̀рга̄н) 1. organ(part of an organism)

    Noun

    organ n 1. (anatomy) an organ(a part of the body) 2. (dated) a voice (of a singer or actor) 2.1. Hon förenade med ett utmärkt teateryttre en hög grad af intelligens, en ypperlig organ och en förträfflig deklamationskonst 2.1.1. She combined with excellent theatrical looks a high degree of intelligence, an extraordinary voice and a splendid mastery of declamation 3. an organ; a newspaper(of an organization, i.e. its voice)

    Anagrams

    1. argon

  10. Drone music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drone_music

    Sep 11, 2020 · Drone music, drone-based music, or simply drone, is a minimalist genre that emphasizes the use of sustained sounds, notes, or tone clusters – called drones.It is typically characterized by lengthy audio programs with relatively slight harmonic variations throughout each piece.

  11. Medieval music - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medieval_music

    6 days ago · Medieval music was an era of Western music, including liturgical music (also known as sacred) used for the church, and secular music, non-religious music. Medieval music includes solely vocal music, such as Gregorian chant and choral music (music for a group of singers), solely instrumental music , and music that uses both voices and ...