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  1. One of the most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, [8] [9] the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore.

    • Overview
    • Early years
    • Discovery of Paris

    Picasso is thought to have made about 50,000 artworks during his lifetime, including paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture, and ceramics. From his extensive production there are many celebrated pieces. Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907) was one of the first Cubist works, and, by rejecting illusionism, which art practice had favoured since the Renaissance, it changed the ways in which people considered the role of art and representation. Guernica (1937), Picasso’s response to the German bombing of Guernica, a city in Spain’s Basque region, was met with mixed criticism when it was first exhibited at the world’s fair in 1937, but it grew in popularity as it toured the world in subsequent decades. A few other famous pieces include a portrait of Gertrude Stein (1905–06), Picasso’s friend and patron; The Old Guitarist (1903–04), a piece from his Blue Period (1901–04); and an untitled sculpture, popularly known as “The Picasso” (1967), located in Chicago, a city which Picasso never visited.

    Read more below: Life and career: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon

    Guernica

    Learn more about Guernica, one of Picasso’s most political and famous paintings.

    Why is Picasso important?

    For nearly 80 of his 91 years, Picasso devoted himself to an artistic production that contributed significantly to the whole development of modern art in the 20th century, notably through the invention of Cubism (with the artist Georges Braque) about 1907. Building on the work of 19th-century art movements, Cubism radically changed the course of representation by acknowledging the illusionistic tricks required to depict three-dimensional objects on a flat canvas. In rejecting the naturalism that Western artists had favoured since the Renaissance, Cubism consequently changed the ways in which people think about the role of art. It ushered in the abstract movements of the 20th century and continues to influence the art of the 21st. Picasso never kept within stylistic boundaries, and he continued to experiment with different approaches and media into the last decade of his life.

    Pablo Picasso was the son of José Ruiz Blasco, a professor of drawing, and Maria Picasso López. His unusual adeptness for drawing began to manifest itself early, around the age of 10, when he became his father’s pupil in A Coruña, where the family moved in 1891. From that point his ability to experiment with what he learned and to develop new expressive means quickly allowed him to surpass his father’s abilities. In A Coruña his father shifted his own ambitions to those of his son, providing him with models and support for his first exhibition there at age 13.

    The family moved to Barcelona in the autumn of 1895, and Pablo entered the local art academy (La Llotja), where his father had assumed his last post as professor of drawing. The family hoped that their son would achieve success as an academic painter, and in 1897 his eventual fame in Spain seemed assured; in that year his painting Science and Charity, for which his father modeled for the doctor, was awarded an honourable mention in Madrid at the Fine Arts Exhibition.

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    Artists, Painters, & Architects

    The Spanish capital was the obvious next stop for the young artist intent on gaining recognition and fulfilling family expectations. Pablo Ruiz duly set off for Madrid in the autumn of 1897 and entered the Royal Academy of San Fernando. But finding the teaching there stupid, he increasingly spent his time recording life around him, in the cafés, on the streets, in the brothels, and in the Prado, where he discovered Spanish painting. He wrote: “The Museum of paintings is beautiful. Velázquez first class; from El Greco some magnificent heads, Murillo does not convince me in every one of his pictures.” Works by those and other artists would capture Picasso’s imagination at different times during his long career. Goya, for instance, was an artist whose works Picasso copied in the Prado in 1898 (a portrait of the bullfighter Pepe Illo and the drawing for one of the Caprichos, Bien tirada está, which shows a Celestina [procuress] checking a young maja’s stockings). Those same characters reappear in his late work—Pepe Illo in a series of engravings (1957) and Celestina as a kind of voyeuristic self-portrait, especially in the series of etchings and engravings known as Suite 347 (1968).

    Picasso fell ill in the spring of 1898 and spent most of the remaining year convalescing in the Catalan village of Horta de Ebro in the company of his Barcelona friend Manuel Pallarès. When Picasso returned to Barcelona in early 1899, he was a changed man: he had put on weight; he had learned to live on his own in the open countryside; he spoke Catalan; and, most important, he had made the decision to break with his art-school training and to reject his family’s plans for his future. He even began to show a decided preference for his mother’s surname, and more often than not he signed his works P.R. Picasso; by late 1901 he had dropped the Ruiz altogether.

    One of Picasso’s principal artistic discoveries on that trip (October–December) was colour—not the drab colours of the Spanish palette, the black of the shawls of Spanish women, or the ochres and browns of the Spanish landscape but brilliant colour—the colour of Vincent van Gogh, of new fashion, of a city celebrating a world’s fair. Using charcoal, pastels, watercolours, and oils, Picasso recorded life in the French capital (Lovers in the Street [1900]). In Moulin de la Galette (1900) he paid tribute to French artists such as Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and the Swiss Théophile Alexandre Steinlen as well as his Catalan compatriot Ramon Casas.

    After just two months Picasso returned to Spain with Casagemas, who had become despondent about a failed love affair. Having tried unsuccessfully to amuse his friend in Málaga, Picasso took off for Madrid, where he worked as an art editor for a new journal, Arte Joven. Casagemas returned to Paris, attempted to shoot the woman he loved, and then turned the gun on himself and died. The impact on Picasso was deep: it was not just that he had lost his loyal friend and perhaps felt a sense of guilt for having abandoned him; more important, he had gained the emotional experience and the material that would stimulate the powerful expressiveness of the works of the so-called Blue Period. Picasso made two death portraits of Casagemas several months later in 1901 as well as two funeral scenes (Mourners and Evocation), and in 1903 Casagemas appeared as the artist in the enigmatic painting La Vie.

  2. Apr 3, 2014 · (1881-1973) Who Was Pablo Picasso? Pablo Picasso was a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist and stage designer considered one of the greatest and most influential artists of the...

  3. www.pablopicasso.org › picasso-biographyPablo Picasso Biography

    As a significant influence on 20th-century art, Pablo Picasso was an innovative artist who experimented and innovated during his 92-plus years on earth. He was not only a master painter but also a sculptor, printmaker, ceramics artist, etching artist and writer.

  4. Pablo Picasso was the most dominant and influential artist of the first half of the 20 th century. Associated most of all with pioneering Cubism, alongside Georges Braque, he also invented collage and made major contributions to Symbolism and Surrealism.

    • Spanish
    • October 25, 1881
    • Malaga, Spain
    • April 8, 1973
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  6. Series - 12 artworks. Pablo Picasso lived in the XIX – XX cent., a remarkable figure of Spanish Cubism and Post-Impressionism. Find more works of this artist at Wikiart.org – best visual art database.

  7. Pablo Picasso. “Variation does not mean evolution,” Pablo Picasso said in 1923. 1 “If an artist varies his mode of expression this only means that he has changed his manner of thinking, and in changing, it may be for the better or it may be for the worse.” 2 With these words, Picasso shed light on two central principles of his artistic ...

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