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  1. Philip IV (April–June 1268 – 29 November 1314), called Philip the Fair ( French: Philippe le Bel ), was King of France from 1285 to 1314. By virtue of his marriage with Joan I of Navarre, he was also King of Navarre as Philip I from 1284 to 1305, as well as Count of Champagne.

  2. Philip IV, byname Philip the Fair, French Philippe le Bel, (born 1268, Fontainebleau, France—died November 29, 1314, Fontainebleau), king of France from 1285 to 1314 (and of Navarre, as Philip I, from 1284 to 1305, ruling jointly with his wife, Joan I of Navarre).

  3. (King of France (1285 - 1314) and King of Navarre (1284 - 1305)) Philip IV, also known as Philip the Fair, was the king of France from 1285 to 1314 and became the king of Navarre and the count of Champagne through his marriage to Joan I of Navarre.

    • Early Life
    • Ascension
    • Pope Boniface VIII
    • The Knights Templar
    • Final Year
    • Conclusion
    • Sources

    His desire to always maintain his authority led him into many conflicts. Philip IV was born in Fontainebleu, France in 1268. At the time of his birth, Philip’s father, Prince Philip, hadn’t yet ascended to the throne. However, that all changed when his father, King Louis IX, died on August 25, 1270. Shortly after Louis’s death, Philip III’s wife Is...

    In October 1285, Philip III died. Consequently, the 17-year-old prince became King Philip IV. The young king’s initial focus was on reforming his government. To ensure that laws were being followed, Philip dispatched his administrators throughout France. Despite his good intentions, the king alienated many French citizens in the process. The French...

    Until the late 1290s, Philip IV had genuinely followed Louis IX’s Christian example. The king donated to religious organizations, adhered to church policies, and considered church official’s advice. Philip also strongly supported the French church and, it in turn, supported him. However, the king refused to have anyone, including a pope, challenge ...

    After the papacy’s move to Avignon, European Christians felt scandalized. The struggle between Philip IV and Boniface VIII had been distasteful. However, Clement V’s willing capitulation to please Philip damaged France’s reputation. Despite the damage, the French king wasn’t yet done. Instead, Philip began to focus on the Knights Templar. The Knigh...

    After the Knights Templar fell, Philip IV gained possession of their wealth and lands. The king justified his actions by claiming the order had committed heresy and deserved to be destroyed. In turn, a weak Clement V defended Philip’s actions. During 1314, the king fell from his horse and broke his leg. The injury became infected, and Philip’s heal...

    Philip IV began his reign by attempting to emulate Louis IX’s example. However, his desire to always maintain his authority made him stray. Instead of seeking peace, Philip indulged in conflict. Instead of being an ally of the church, Philip sought its submission to him. By the end of his reign, Flanders had been subjugated, the papacy resided in A...

    Bradbury, J. (2010). The Capetians: Kings of France, 987-1328. London: Hambledon Continuum. Brown, E. A. R. (2020, January 1). Philip IV. Retrieved February 7, 2020, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Philip-IV-king-of-France Daugherty, G. (2019, February 21). In 1303 the French King Sent Goons to Attack and Kidnap the Pope. Retrieved Februa...

  4. Philip's duty to God and to his people was to strengthen the Kingdom of France, and anyone who interefered with this task, baron or emperor, bishop or pope, was to be swept aside. He and his advisers had a fairly clear concept of sovereignty. Everyone who was "in and of the kingdom" owed obedience to the king. But what was the kingdom?

  5. Philip IV (April–June 1268 – 29 November 1314), called Philip the Fair (French: Philippe le Bel), was King of France from 1285 to 1314. By virtue of his marriage with Joan I of Navarre, he was also King of Navarre as Philip I from 1284 to 1305, as well as Count of Champagne.

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