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  1. The Program and System Information Protocol (PSIP) is the MPEG (a video and audio industry group) and privately defined program-specific information originally defined by General Instrument for the DigiCipher 2 system and later extended for the ATSC digital television system for carrying metadata about each channel in the broadcast MPEG transport stream of a television station and for ...

  2. The Program and System Information Protocol (PSIP) is the MPEG (a video and audio industry group) and privately defined program-specific information originally defined by General Instrument for the DigiCipher 2 system and later extended for the ATSC digital television system for carrying metadata about each channel in the broadcast MPEG transport stream of a television station and for ...

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    What is the program and System Information Protocol?

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    How is a networking protocol implemented in a computer?

    What are the different versions of Internet Protocol?

    • PSIP For Dummies, Please
    • Time
    • Needs Summary of STDs, and Criticism Section

    Please, would someone explain to me, simplified, why a TV station needs to have a "virtual channel", and how it works. Okay, for example WGPR-TV Detroit, Channel 62 analogue. When analogue shuts off early in 2009, it will be on Channel 44, but it will be identified as 62. So, if I punch in 62 on my TV remote, I should get a blank channel and snow, right? But if the TV is programmed to go to 44 instead, but show 62, then what if I move to Los Angeles, another city that used to have a Channel 62, but in that city, the station is now on Channel 35, but PSIPed as 62? Therefore, the set will go to 44 and find nothing, right? I'd have to reprogram it to find 62 on 35 instead of finding 62 on 44. It sounds so stupid. GBC (talk) 08:24, 2 November 2008 (UTC) 1. So stations won't have to change their numbers (and can maintain the same numbers for their analog and digital broadcasts during the transition period, and can identify their main channel and sub channels with the same basic number)....

    In my area, the time signals broadcast by some stations appear to be off by minutes! -- AnonMoos (talk) 13:18, 19 January 2009 (UTC)

    to be more comprehensive, the article needs to have a bit more than a one sentence summary of the relevant standards and a criticism section (to discuss the horrible data quality of most markets PSIP data - this.tv and WMFP in Boston, for example) 208.54.36.229 (talk) 11:04, 1 February 2012 (UTC)

  4. Dec 21, 2020 · The Program and System Information Protocol (PSIP) is the MPEG (a video and audio industry group) and privately defined program-specific information originally defined by General Instrument for the DigiCipher 2 system and later extended for the ATSC digital television system for carrying metadata about each channel in the broadcast MPEG ...

  5. A communication protocol is a system of rules that allows two or more entities of a communications system to transmit information via any kind of variation of a physical quantity.

    • Function
    • Reliability
    • History

    The Internet Protocol gets information from a source computer to a destination computer. It sends this information in the form of packets. There are two versions of the Internet Protocol currently in use: IPv4 and IPv6, with IPv4 being the version most used. IP also gives computers an IP addressto identify each other, much like a typical physical address. IP is the primary protocol in the Internet Layer of the Internet Protocol Suite, which is a set of communications protocols consisting of seven abstraction layers (see OSI model), The main purpose and task of IP is the delivery of datagrams from the source host (source computer) to the destination host (receiving computer) based on their addresses. To achieve this, IP includes methods and structures for putting tags (address information, which is part of metadata) within datagrams. The process of putting these tags on datagrams is called encapsulation.Think of an anology with the postal system. IP is similar to the U.S. Postal Syst...

    ARPANET, the early ancestor of the internet, was designed to survive a nuclear war. If one computer was destroyed, communication between all the other computers would still work. Computer networks still follow this same design. Computers talking to each other handle the "smart" functions to simplify computer networks. The end nodes will check for errors instead of a central authority. Keeping the "smart" things on the end computers or nodesfollows the end-to-end principle. The Internet Protocol sends packets out without ensuring they arrive safely. This is best-effort delivery, and is unreliable. Packets could get messed up, lost, duplicated, or received out of order. Higher level protocols like the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) ensure packets are delivered correctly. IP is also connectionless, so it does not keep track of communications. Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4) uses a checksumto check for errors in an IP header. Every checksum is unique to a source/destination comb...

    In 1974, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers published a paper called "A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication". The paper described a way for computers to talk to each other using Packet Switching. A big part of this idea was the "Transmission Control Program". The Transmission Control Program was too big, so it split into TCP and IP. This model is now called the DoD Internet Model and Internet Protocol Suite, or the TCP/IP Model. Versions 0 to 3 of IP were experimental, and used between 1977 and 1979. IPv4 addresses will run out, because the number of possible addresses is finite. To fix this, the IEEE made IPv6 which had even more addresses. While IPv4 has 4.3 Billion addresses, IPv6 has 340 undecillionof them. This means we will never run out of IPv6 addresses. IPv5 was reserved for the Internet Stream Protocol, which was only used experimentally.

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