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  1. Richard Whately (1 February 1787 – 8 October 1863) was an English academic, rhetorician, logician, philosopher, economist, and theologian who also served as a reforming Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin.

    Richard Whately - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Whately
  2. Richard Whately - Wikipedia

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    Richard Whately (1 February 1787 – 8 October 1863) was an English academic, rhetorician, logician, philosopher, economist, and theologian who also served as a reforming Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin.

    • 5Philosophy career
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  3. Richard Whately - New World Encyclopedia

    www.newworldencyclopedia.org › entry › Richard_Whately
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    Richard Whately was born on February 1, 1787, in London, England, the youngest of nine children of the Rev. Dr. Joseph Whately. As a child, he spent most of his days in his grandfather's garden, daydreaming and studying insects. At the age of nine, his parents sent him to a private school outside Bristol, and in April 1805, Whately was accepted into Oriel College, Oxford, under the tutelage of Edward Copleston. He obtained double second-class honors and the prize for the English essay; in 1811, Whately’s diligence as a student resulted in what he viewed as his highest personal achievement, being elected a fellow of Oriel College. In 1814, he took holy orders. While at Oxford, he wrote his satiric Historic Doubts Relative to Napoleon Bonaparte (1819), a clever jeu d'ésprit directed against excessive skepticismtowards Gospel history. After his marriage in 1821, he settled in Oxford, and in 1822, was appointed Bampton lecturer. The lectures, On the Use and Abuse of Party Spirit in Matt...

    Whately was a great talker, and during his early life he loved to argue, using others as instruments on which to hammer out his own views. As he advanced in life, he adopted a style of didactic monologue. His keen wit frequently inflicted wounds which he never deliberately intended, and he loved punning. Whately often offended people by the extreme unconventionality of his manners. When at Oxford, his white hat, rough white coat, and huge white dog earned for him the sobriquet of the “White Bear,” and he outraged the conventions of Oxford by exhibiting the exploits of his climbing dog in Christchurch Meadow. He had a fair and lucid mind, but was opinionated, and his outspokenness on points of difference alienated many. Having no tendency towards mysticism, he found the Tractarian movement incomprehensible and regarded it with dislike and contempt. The doctrines of the Low Church party also seemed to him tinged with superstition. He took a practical, almost business-like view of Chri...

    Akenson, Donald H. A Protestant in Purgatory: Richard Whately, Archbishop of Dublin (The Conference on British Studies Biography Series). Archon Books, 1981. ISBN 978-0208019172
    Bacon, Francis. Bacon's Essays, with Annotations by Richard Whately and Notes and a Glossarial Index, by Franklin Fiske Heard. Scholarly Publishing Office, University of Michigan Library, 2006. ISB...
    Parton, Craig. Richard Whately: A Man for All Seasons. Canadian Institute for Law, 1997. ISBN 978-1896363073
    Patokorpi, Erkki. Rhetoric, Argumentative and Divine: Richard Whately and His Discursive Project of the 1820s. Peter Lang Publishing, 1996. ISBN 978-0820431918

    All links retrieved July 28, 2019. 1. Works by Richard Whately. Project Gutenberg. 2. Introductory Lectures on Political Economy.

  4. Richard Whately | English author and archbishop | Britannica

    www.britannica.com › biography › Richard-Whately

    Richard Whately, (born Feb. 1, 1787, London, Eng.—died Oct. 8, 1863, Dublin, Ire.), Anglican archbishop of Dublin, educator, logician, and social reformer. The son of a clergyman, Whately was educated at Oriel College, Oxford, and took holy orders.

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    He was born in London, the son of the Rev. Dr. Joseph Whately (17 March 1730 – 13 March 1797). He was educated at a private school near Bristol, and at Oriel College, Oxford. Richard Whately obtained double second-class honours and the prize for the English essay; in 1811 he was elected Fellow of Oriel, and in 1814 took holy orders. After his marriage in 1821 he settled in Oxford. In August 1823 he moved to Halesworth in Suffolk, but in 1825, having been appointed principal of St. Alban Hall, he returned to Oxford. He found much to reform there, and left it a different place. He was initially on friendly terms with John Henry Newman, but they fell out as the divergence in their views became apparent; Newman later spoke of his Catholic University as continuing in Dublin the struggle against Whately which he had commenced at Oxford. In 1829 Whately was elected to the professorship of political economy at Oxford in succession to Nassau William Senior. His tenure of office was cut short...

    During his residence at Oxford Whately wrote his tract, Historic Doubts relative to Napoleon Bonaparte, a jeu d'ésprit directed against excessive scepticism as applied to the Gospel history. In 1822 he was appointed Bampton lecturer. The lectures, On the Use and Abuse of Party Spirit in Matters of Religion, were published in the same year. In 1825 he published a series of Essays on Some of the Peculiarities of the Christian Religion, followed in 1828 by a second series On some of the Difficulties in the Writings of St Paul, and in 1830 by a third On the Errors of Romanism traced to their Origin in Human Nature. While he was at St Alban Hall (1826) the work appeared which is perhaps most closely associated with his name—a treatise on logic entitled Elements of Logic. In the preface to the Elements of Logic, Whately wrote that the substance of the treatise was drawn from an article written by himself, entitled Logic, which had already been published in the Encyclopædia Metropolitana....

    Whately was a great talker, much addicted in early life to argument, in which he used others as instruments on which to hammer out his own views, and as he advanced in life much given to didactic monologue. He had a keen wit, whose sharp edge often inflicted wounds never deliberately intended by the speaker, a healthy appetite and a wholly uncontrollable love of punning. Whately often offended people by the extreme unconventionality of his manners. When at Oxford his white hat, rough white coat, and huge white dog earned for him the sobriquet of the White Bear, and he outraged the conventions of the place by exhibiting the exploits of his climbing dog in Christchurch Meadow. Whately was a devout Christian, but opposed to mere outward displays of faith. While sharing the Evangelical belief in Scripture as the sole instrument of salvation, and also like the Evangelicals being a Biblical literalist, he disagreed with the Evangelical party on the applicability of the Mosaic laws to Chri...

    A modern biography is Richard Whately: A Man for All Seasons by Craig Parton ISBN 1-896363-07-5. See also Donald Harman Akenson A Protestant in Purgatory: Richard Whately, Archbishop of Dublin(South Bend, Indiana 1981) 1. Einhorn, Lois J. "Consistency in Richard Whately: The Scope of His Rhetoric." Philosophy & Rhetoric14 (Spring 1981): 89–99. 2. Einhorn, Lois J. "Richard Whately's Public Persuasion: The Relationship between His Rhetorical Theory and His Rhetorical Practice." Rhetorica4 (Winter 1986): 47–65. 3. Einhorn, Lois J. "Did Napoleon Live? Presumption and Burden of Proof in Richard Whately's Historic Doubts Relative to Napoleon Boneparte." Rhetoric Society Quarterly16 (1986): 285–97. 4. Giustino, David de. "Finding an archbishop: the Whigs and Richard Whately in 1831." Church History64 (1995): 218–36. 5. McKerrow, Ray E. "Richard Whately: Religious Controversialist of the Nineteenth Century." Prose Studies: 1800–19002 (1979): 160–87. 6. McKerrow, Ray E. "Archbishop Whately:...

  5. Richard Whately Quotes - BrainyQuote

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    Richard Whately Man Birth Far As one may bring himself to believe almost anything he is inclined to believe, it makes all the difference whether we begin or end with the inquiry, 'What is truth?'

    • October 8, 1863
  6. Richard Whately - hetwebsite.net

    hetwebsite.net › het › profiles

    Richard Whately was educated in Bristol and Oriel College, Oxford, Whately was a leader of the "Noetic" generation at Oriel.

  7. TOP 25 QUOTES BY RICHARD WHATELY (of 115) | A-Z Quotes

    www.azquotes.com › author › 15546-Richard_Whately
    • To know your ruling passion, examine your castles in the air. Richard Whately. Passion, Air, Words Of Wisdom.
    • Curiosity is as much the parent of attention, as attention is of memory. Richard Whately. Memories, Parent, Curiosity.
    • Manners are one of the greatest engines of influence ever given to man. Richard Whately. Men, Influence, Manners.
    • To teach one who has no curiosity to learn, is to sow a field without ploughing it. Richard Whately. Science, Curiosity, Ploughing.
  8. Richard Whately (Whately, Richard, 1787-1863) | The Online ...

    onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu › webbin › book

    Richard Whately (Whately, Richard, 1787-1863) An online book about this author is available, as is a Wikipedia article. Whately, Richard, 1787-1863, contrib.: Account of an Expedition to the Interior of New Holland (London: R. Bentley, 1837), by Mary Fox. multiple formats at archive.org; page images at HathiTrust

  9. Richard Whately's theory of argument and its influence on the ...

    pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu › cgi › viewcontent

    of argument, was Richard Whately, the Anglican Archbishop and rhetorical theorist of the early nineteenth century.

    • Robert Allan Vogel
    • 1986
  10. Richard Whateley - Historical records and family trees ...

    www.myheritage.com › names › richard_whateley

    Richard Bithell Whateley was born on month day 1864, at birth place, to Richard Whateley and Emily Smith (born Bitthell). Richard was born on February 25 1825, in Packwood, Warwickshire, England. Emily was born circa 1840, in Birmingham, Warwickshire, England. Richard was baptized on month day 1866, at baptism place.

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