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  1. Sappho - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Sappho

    Sappho was a prolific poet, probably composing around 10,000 lines. Her poetry was well-known and greatly admired through much of antiquity, and she was among the canon of Nine Lyric Poets most highly esteemed by scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria. Sappho's poetry is still considered extraordinary and her works continue to influence other writers.

  2. About Sappho | Academy of American Poets

    poets.org › poet › sappho

    Sappho's school devoted itself to the cult of Aphrodite and Eros, and Sappho earned great prominence as a dedicated teacher and poet. A legend from Ovid suggests that she threw herself from a cliff when her heart was broken by Phaon, a young sailor, and died at an early age. Other historians posit that she died of old age around 550 B.C.

  3. Sappho | Poetry Foundation

    www.poetryfoundation.org › poets › sappho

    In antiquity Sappho was regularly counted among the greatest of poets and was often referred to as "the Poetess," just as Homer was called "the Poet." Plato hailed her as "the tenth Muse," and she was honored on coins and with civic statuary.

  4. Sappho is not only one of the few women poets we know of from antiquity, but also is one of the greatest lyric poets from any age. Most of her poems were meant to be sung by one person to the accompaniment of the lyre (hence the name, "lyric" poetry).

  5. Sappho | LGBT Info | Fandom

    lgbt.wikia.org › wiki › Sappho
    • Life
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    No contemporary historical sources exist for Sappho's life—only her poetry. While it is natural to suppose some commonality of experience between Sappho's poetic personaand the historical Sappho, scholars have rejected a biographical reading of the poetry and have cast grave doubts on the reliability of the later biographical traditions from which all more detailed accounts derive. Sappho is believed to have been the daughter of Scamander and Cleïs and to have had three brothers. She was married (Attic comedy says to a wealthy merchant, but that is apocryphal), the name of her husband being in dispute. Some translators have interpreted a poem about a girl named Cleïs as being evidence that she had a daughter by that name. It was a common practice of the time to name daughters after grandmothers, so there is some basis for this interpretation. But the actual Aeolic word pais was more often used to indicate a slave or any young girl, rather than a daughter. In order to avoid misrepres...

    Template:Wikisource authorAncient sources state that Sappho produced nine volumes of poetry, but only a small proportion of her work survives. Papyrus fragments, such as those found in the ancient rubbish heaps of Oxyrhynchus, are an important source. One substantial fragment is preserved on a potsherd. The rest of what we know of Sappho comes through citations in other ancient writers, often made to illustrate grammar, vocabulary, or meter. There is a single complete poem, Fragment 1, Hymn to Aphrodite.There is another modern translation of that ode, and translations of two more virtually complete poems (16 and 31 in the standard numeration) and three shorter fragments, including one whose authorship is uncertain (168b). The most recent addition to the corpus is a virtually complete poem on old age. The line-ends were first published in 1922 from an Oxyrhynchus papyrus, no. 1787 (fragment 1: see the third pair of images on this page), but little could be made of them, since the ind...

    Greek Lyric 1: Sappho and Alcaeus, D. A. Campbell (ed.), Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., (1982) ISBN 0-674-99157-5(Contains complete Greek text and English translation, including refere...
    If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho by Anne Carson (Translator) Knopf (2002) ISBN 0-375-41067-8; also Virago Press Ltd, UK, ISBN 1-84408-081-1 (A modern bilingual edition for general readers as wel...
    Poetarum Lesbiorum fragmenta, E. Lobel, D. L. Page (eds.), Oxford, Clarendon Press, (1955).
    Sappho: 100 Lyrics by Carman Bliss (1907) Public domain text available from Project Gutenberg
  6. Sappho - Greek Poet in Ancient / Classical History

    www.thoughtco.com › profile-of-sappho-120941

    Mar 08, 2017 · The dates of Sappho or Psappho are not known. She is thought to have been born around 610 B.C. and to have died in about 570. This was the period of the sages Thales, considered, by Aristotle, the founder of natural philosophers, and Solon, the lawgiver of Athens. In Rome, it was the time of the legendary kings.

  7. Sappho: The Poetess — Making Queer History

    www.makingqueerhistory.com › articles › sappho

    Mar 04, 2016 · Sappho lived sometime in the early seventh century on the island of Lesbos. She mentioned multiple women with whom she had varying relationships. She names them: her companions Anaktoria, Atthis, Gongyla, her friends Mika, Telesippa, Anagora, and two people she had falling outs with Gorgo and Andromeda.

  8. Sappho of Lesbos - World History Encyclopedia

    www.worldhistory.orgSappho_of_Lesbos

    Jun 10, 2021 · Sappho of Lesbos (l. c. 620-570 BCE) was a lyric poet whose work was so popular in ancient Greece that she was honored in statuary, coinage, and pottery centuries after her death. Little remains of her work, and these fragments suggest she was gay. Her name inspired the terms 'sapphic' and 'lesbian', both referencing female same-sex relationships.

    • Joshua J. Mark
  9. How Gay Was Sappho? | The New Yorker

    www.newyorker.com › magazine › 2015/03/16

    Mar 09, 2015 · The dialect, diction, and metre of these Greek verses were all typical of the work of Sappho, the seventh-century-B.C. lyric genius whose sometimes playful, sometimes anguished songs about her...

    • Daniel Mendelsohn
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