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  1. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Simon_de_Montfort,_6th

    Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (c. 1205 – 4 August 1265), later sometimes referred to as Simon V de Montfort to distinguish him from his namesake relatives, was a nobleman of French origin and a member of the English peerage, who led the baronial opposition to the rule of King Henry III of England, culminating in the Second Barons' War.

  2. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (c.1208 - 1265 ...

    www.geni.com › people › Simon-de-Montfort-6th-Earl
    • Contents
    • Family and Early Life
    • Royal Marriage
    • Crusade and Turning Against The King
    • War Against The King
    • Death
    • Legacy
    • Family
    • Bibliography
    • References
    1 Family and early life
    2 Royal marriage
    3 Crusade and turning against the king
    4 War against the king

    He was the youngest son of Simon de Montfort, a French nobleman and crusader, and Alix de Montmorency. His paternal grandmother was Amicia de Beaumont, the senior co-heiress to the Earldom of Leicester and a large estate owned by her father Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester in England, but King John of England would not allow a French subject to take ownership of such an estate in England. As a boy, de Montfort accompanied his parents during his father's campaigns against the Cathars. He was with his mother at the siege of Toulouse in 1218, where his father was killed after being struck on the head by a stone pitched by a mangonel. On the death of their father, de Montfort's elder brother Amaury succeeded him. Another brother, Guy, was killed at the siege of Castelnaudary in 1220. As a young man, Montfort probably took part in the Albigensian Crusades of the early 1220s. In 1229 the two surviving brothers (Amaury and Simon) came to an arrangement whereby Simon gave up his ri...

    In January 1238 de Montfort married Eleanor of England, daughter of King John and Isabella of Angoulême and sister of King Henry III. While this marriage took place with the king's approval, the act itself was performed secretly and without consulting the great barons, as a marriage of such importance warranted. Eleanor had previously been married to William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, and she swore a vow of perpetual chastity upon his death, when she was sixteen, which she broke by marrying de Montfort. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Rich, condemned the marriage for this reason. The English nobles protested the marriage of the King's sister to a foreigner of modest rank; most notably, Eleanor's brother Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall rose up in revolt when he learned of the marriage. King Henry eventually bought off Richard with 6,000 marks and peace was restored. Relations between King Henry and de Montfort were cordial at first. Henry lent him his support when de Montfort...

    Shortly after Prince Edward's birth, however, there was a falling out. Simon owed a great sum of money to Thomas II of Savoy, uncle of Queen Eleanor, and named Henry as security for his repayment. King Henry had evidently not been told of this, and when he discovered that Montfort had used his name, he was enraged. On 9 August 1239 Henry confronted Montfort, called him an excommunicant and threatened to imprison him in the Tower of London. "You seduced my sister", King Henry said, "and when I discovered this, I gave her to you, against my will, to avoid scandal." Most historians perceive this to be the outbursts of an angry monarch, rather than fact[citation needed]. Simon and Eleanor fled to France to escape Henry's wrath. Having announced his intention to go on crusade two years before, Simon raised funds and travelled to the Holy Land, but does not seem to have ever faced combat there. That autumn, he left Syria and joined King Henry's campaign in Poitou. The campaign was a failu...

    Simon de Montfort returned in 1263, at the invitation of the barons, who were now convinced of the king's hostility to all reform; and raised a rebellion with the avowed object of restoring the form of government which the Provisions had ordained. For a few weeks it seemed as though the royalists were at his mercy; but he made the mistake of accepting Henry's offer to abide by the arbitration of Louis IX of France. At Amiens, in January 1264, the French king decided that the Provisions were unlawful and invalid. De Montfort, who had remained in England to prepare for the ruling, at once resumed the war, and thus exposed himself to accusations of perjury, from which he can only be defended on the hypothesis that he had been led to hope for a genuine compromise. Though merely supported by the towns and a few of the younger barons, he triumphed by superior generalship at the Battle of Lewes on 14 May 1264, where the king, Prince Edward, and Richard of Cornwall fell into his hands. De M...

    Simon de Montfort died on 4 August 1265 at the battle of Evesham, and was buried at the nearby Evesham Abbey. De Montfort and his army were awaiting the army led by his second son, Simon. He saw his son's banners flying high and began to hope, with the two armies they had a fighting chance to claim England. However, his son had been ambushed, and Prince Edward, Henry's son, led the army carrying de Montfort's stolen banners. From within the church of Evesham, de Montfort and his army led a final charge to their death. After a charge uphill against superior forces, Simon's army was completely destroyed; the battle was described as the "murder of Evesham, for battle it was none". Simon's body was cut up and different parts sent to the Lords who had accomplished the most. His head was sent to Wigmore Castle by Roger de Mortimer, 1st Baron Wigmore as a gift to his wife, Maud. Such remains as could be found were buried under the altar of Evesham Abbey by some clerks. It was visited as ho...

    In the years that followed his death, Simon de Montfort's grave was frequently visited by pilgrims. There was an attempt to canonise him; this was not carried out however, due to opposition by the English monarchy at the time[citation needed]. Today, de Montfort is mostly remembered for calling the first directly elected parliament and is regarded as one of the fathers of modern democracy. He may have a more romantic legacy; Roger Godberd, one of de Montfort's captains who survived Evesham, fought on until his capture in 1272 as a bandit or rebel in and around the Sherwood Forest area. Godberd is one candidate for being the character around whom the Robin Hood legend is based. Napoleon Bonaparte described Simon de Montfort as "one of the greatest Englishmen". Various local honors were dedicated to his memory, and he has become eponymous several times over. De Montfort Hall, a concert venue in Leicester, is named after de Montfort, as is the nearby De Montfort University. A statue of...

    Simon de Montfort and Eleanor of England had seven children, many of whom were notable in their own right: 1. Henry de Montfort (November 1238–1265) 2. Simon the Younger de Montfort (April 1240–1271) 3. Amaury de Montfort, Canon of York (1242/1243-1300) 4. Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola (1244–1288). Elizabeth Woodville, Queen Consort of Edward IV of England, was one of Guy's descendants. 5. Joanna de Montfort (born and died in Bordeaux between 1248 and 1251). 6. Richard de Montfort (d.1266). Date of death is not certain. 7. Eleanor de Montfort (1252–1282). She married Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales, honouring an agreement that had been made between Earl Simon and Llywelyn. Eleanor, Lady of Wales, died on 19 June 1282 at the royal Welsh home Garth Celyn, Aber Garth Celyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, giving birth to a daughter, Gwenllian of Wales. After Llywelyn's death on 11 December 1282, Gwenllian was captured by King Edward I and spent the rest of her life in a convent....

    Labarge, Margaret Wade. Simon de Montfort (London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1962)
    Maddicott, J. R. Simon de Montfort, 1996
    1. Thomas B. Costain, The Magnificent Century, p. 308
    2. For example see BBC website, accessed 11 May 2008 on the Godberd theory.
    3. Maurice Hugh Keen The Outlaws of Medieval England, 1987, Routledge
    4. Napoleon Bonaparte, Napoleon's Notes on English History made on the Eve of the French Revolution, illustrated from Contemporary Historians and referenced from the findings of Later Research by H...
  3. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester | Military Wiki | Fandom

    military.wikia.org › wiki › Simon_de_Montfort,_6th
    • Family
    • Early Life
    • Royal Marriage
    • Crusade and Turning Against The King
    • War Against The King
    • Death
    • Legacy
    • in Fiction
    • Descendants
    • Bibliography

    De Montfort was a younger son of Simon de Montfort, a French nobleman and crusader, and Alix de Montmorency. His paternal grandmother was Amicia de Beaumont, the senior co-heiress to the Earldom of Leicester and a large estate owned by her brother Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester, in England. With the irrevocable loss of Normandy, King John of England refused to allow the elder Simon to succeed to the earldom of Leicester and instead placed the estates and title into the hands of Montfort senior's cousin Ranulf, the earl of Chester. The elder Simon had also acquired vast domains during the Albigensian Crusade, but was killed during the siege of Toulouse in 1218 and his eldest son Amaury was not able to retain them. When Amaury was rebuffed in his attempt to get the earldom back, he agreed to allow his younger brother Simon to claim it in return for all family possessions in France. Simon arrived in England in 1229, with some education but no knowledge of English, and receiv...

    Since he was a younger son, little attention was paid to him during his youth and the date of birth remains unknown. He is first mentioned when his mother made a grant to him in 1217. As a boy, Montfort accompanied his parents during his father's campaigns against the Cathars. He was with his mother at the siege of Toulouse in 1218, where his father was killed after being struck on the head by a stone pitched by a mangonel. In addition to Amaury, Simon had another older brother, Guy, who was killed at the siege of Castelnaudary in 1220. As a young man, Montfort probably took part in the Albigensian Crusadesof the early 1220s. In 1229, the two surviving brothers (Amaury and Simon) came to an arrangement with King Henry whereby Simon gave up his rights in France and Amaury gave up his rights in England. Thus free from any allegiance to the King of France, de Montfort successfully petitioned for the English inheritance, which he received the next year, although he did not take full pos...

    In January 1238, Montfort married Eleanor of England, daughter of King John and Isabella of Angoulême and sister of King Henry III. While this marriage took place with the king's approval, the act itself was performed secretly and without consulting the great barons, as a marriage of such importance warranted. Eleanor had previously been married to William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, and she swore a vow of perpetual chastity upon his death, when she was sixteen, which she broke by marrying Montfort. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Rich, condemned the marriage for this reason. The English nobles protested the marriage of the King's sister to a foreigner of modest rank. Most notably, Eleanor's brother Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall, rose up in revolt when he learned of the marriage. King Henry eventually bought off Richard with 6,000 marks and peace was restored. The marriage brought the manor of Sutton Valence in Kent into de Montfort's possession. Relations between King Henry...

    Shortly after Prince Edward's birth, however, there was a falling out between the brothers-in-law. Simon owed a great sum of money to Thomas II of Savoy, uncle of Queen Eleanor, and named King Henry as security for his repayment. The King evidently had not approved this, and was enraged when he discovered that de Montfort had used his name. On 9 August 1239, Henry is reported to have confronted de Montfort, called him an excommunicant and threatened to imprison him in the Tower of London. "You seduced my sister", King Henry said, "and when I discovered this, I gave her to you, against my will, to avoid scandal." Most historians perceive this to be an angry outburst rather than a factual statement.[citation needed]Simon and Eleanor fled to France to escape Henry's wrath. Having announced his intention to go on crusade two years before, Simon raised funds and travelled to the Holy Land, but does not seem to have faced combat there. In autumn 1241, he left Syria and joined King Henry's...

    Simon de Montfort returned to England in 1263, at the invitation of the barons who were now convinced of the King's hostility to all reform and raised a rebellion with the avowed object of restoring the form of government which the Provisions had ordained. Henry quickly gave in and allowed de Montfort to take control of the council. His son Edward, however, began using patronage and bribes to win over many of the barons. Their disruption of parliament in October led to a renewal of hostilities, which saw the royalists able to trap Simon in London. With few other options available, de Montfort agreed to allow Louis IX of France to arbitrate their dispute. Simon was prevented from presenting his case to Louis directly on account of a broken leg, but little suspected that the King of France, known for his innate sense of justice, would completely annul the Provisions in his Mise of Amiens in January 1264. Civil war broke out almost immediately, with the royalists again able to confine...

    An ominous black cloud hung over the field of Evesham as Montfort led his army in a desperate assault on 4 August 1265. Charging uphill against superior forces, his army was eventually destroyed; the battle was described as the "murder of Evesham, for battle it was none".[citation needed] His last words were said to have been "Thank God". Simon de Montfort died on 4 August 1265 at the battle of Evesham, and his remains were buried secretly at the nearby Evesham Abbey. On hearing that his son Henry had been killed, he replied "Then it is time to die." He was then hemmed in and slain along with other leaders of his movement, including Peter de Montfort and Hugh Despenser. Simon's body was mutilated in an unparalleled frenzy by the royalists. His head was sent to Wigmore Castle by Roger Mortimer, 1st Baron Mortimer as a gift to his wife, Maud. Such remains as could be found were buried under the altar of Evesham Abbey by the canons. It was visited as holy ground by many commoners until...

    In the years that followed his death, Simon de Montfort's grave was frequently visited by pilgrims. There was an attempt to canonise him; this was not carried out however, due to opposition by the English monarchy at the time[citation needed]. Today, Montfort is mostly remembered as one of the fathers of modern democracy. He may have a more romantic legacy; Roger Godberd, one of Montfort's captains who survived Evesham, fought on until his capture in 1272 as a bandit or rebel in and around the Sherwood Forest area. Godberd is one candidate for being the character around whom the Robin Hood legend is based. Napoleon Bonapartedescribed Simon de Montfort as "one of the greatest Englishmen". Various local honours were dedicated to his memory, and he has become eponymous several times over. De Montfort University in Leicester is named after him, as is the nearby De Montfort Hall, a concert venue. A statue of de Montfort is one of four to adorn the Haymarket Memorial Clock Tower in Leices...

    Sharon Penman's novel, Falls the Shadow, is a fictional retelling of de Montfort's life from his arrival in England to his death. The Montfort story is the focus of the second part of The Brothers of Gwynedd Quartet by Edith Pargeter (who also wrote as Ellis Peters). The four books tell the story of Llewellyn Prince of Wales, who married Simon's daughter Eleanor, and his three brothers. More recently are the four speculative novels, Montfort, Vol. I-IV, by Katherine Ashe.

    Simon de Montfort and Eleanor of Leicesterhad seven children, many of whom were notable in their own right: 1. Henry de Montfort(November 1238 – 1265) 2. Simon the Younger de Montfort(April 1240 – 1271) 3. Amaury de Montfort, Canon of York(1242/1243-1300) 4. Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola (1244–1288). Elizabeth Woodville, Queen Consort of Edward IV of England, was one of Guy's descendants through his daughter, Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola. 5. Joanna de Montfort (born and died in Bordeaux between 1248 and 1251). 6. Richard de Montfort (d.1266). Date of death is not certain. 7. Eleanor de Montfort (1252–1282). She married Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Prince of Wales, honouring an agreement that had been made between Earl Simon and Llywelyn. Eleanor, Lady of Wales, died on 19 June 1282 at the royal Welsh home at Abergwyngregyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, giving birth to a daughter, Gwenllian of Wales. After Llywelyn's death on 11 December 1282, Gwenllian was captured by King Ed...

    Goldstone, Nancy (2009). Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe. Phoenix Paperbacks, London.
    Labarge, Margaret Wade. Simon de Montfort(London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1962)
    Maddicott, John Robert. Simon de Montfort.1996, Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-37493-6
    This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911) Encyclopædia Britannica(11th ed.) Cambridge University Press
  4. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester | Rankin Family Tree ...

    rankinfamilytree.fandom.com › wiki › Simon_de
    • Family and Early Life
    • Royal Marriage
    • Crusade and Turning Against The King
    • War Against The King
    • Death
    • Legacy
    • Family

    De Monfort was the youngest son of Simon de Montfort, a French nobleman and crusader, and Alix de Montmorency. His paternal grandmother was Amicia de Beaumont, the senior co-heiress to the Earldom of Leicester and a large estate owned by her father Robert de Beaumont, 3rd Earl of Leicester in England, but King John of Englandwould not allow a French subject to take ownership of such an estate in England. As a boy, de Monfort accompanied his parents during his father's campaigns against the Cathars. He was with his mother at the siege of Toulouse in 1218, where his father was killed after being struck on the head by a stone pitched by a mangonel. On the death of their father, de Monfort's elder brother Amaurysucceeded him. Another brother, Guy, was killed at the siege of Castelnaudary in 1220. As a young man, Montfort probably took part in the Albigensian Crusades of the early 1220s. In 1229 the two surviving brothers (Amaury and Simon) came to an arrangement whereby Simon gave up hi...

    In January 1238 de Monfort married Eleanor of England, daughter of King John and Isabella of Angouleme and sister of King Henry III. While his marriage took place with the king's approval, the act itself was performed secretly and without consulting the great barons, as a marriage of such importance warranted. Eleanor had previously been married to William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, and she swore a vow of perpetual chastity upon his death, when she was sixteen, which she broke by marrying de Monfort. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Rich, condemned the marriage for this reason. The English nobles protested the marriage of the King's sister to a foreigner of modest rank; most notably, Eleanor's brother Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwallrose up in revolt when he learned of the marriage. King Henry eventually bought off Richard with 6,000 marks and peace was restored. The marriage brought the manor of Sutton Valence in Kent into de Monfort's possession. Relations between King Henry...

    Shortly after Prince Edward's birth, however, there was a falling out. Simon owed a great sum of money to Thomas II of Savoy, uncle of Queen Eleanor, and named Henry as security for his repayment. King Henry had evidently not been told of this, and when he discovered that Monfort had used his name, he was enraged. On August 9, 1239 Henry confronted Monfort, called him a excommunicant and threatened to imprison him in the Tower of London. "You seduced my sister", King Henry said, "and when I discovered this, I gave her to you, against my will, to avoid scandal." Most historians perceive this to be the outbursts of an angry monarch, rather than fact. Simon and Eleanor fled to France to escape Henry's wrath. Having announced his intention to go on crusade two years before, Simon raised funds and travelled to the Holy Land, but does not seem to have ever faced combat there. That autumn, he left Syria and joined King Henry's campaign in Poitou. The campaign was a failure, and an exaspera...

    Simon de Monfort returned in 1263, at the invitation of the barons, who were now convinced of the king's hostility to all reform; and raised a rebellion with the avowed object of restoring the form of government which the Provisions had ordained. For a few weeks it seemed as though the royalists were at his mercy; but he made the mistake of accepting Henry's offer to abide by the arbitration of Louis IX of France. At Amiens, in January 1264, the French king decided that the Provisions were unlawful and invalid. De Montfort, who had remained in England to prepare for the ruling, at once resumed the war, and thus exposed himself to accusations of perjury, from which he can only be defended on the hypothesis that he had been led to hope for a genuine compromise. Though merely supported by the towns and a few of the younger barons, he triumphed by superior generalship at the Battle of Leweson May 14, 1264, where the king, Prince Edward and Richard of Cornwall fell into his hands. De Mon...

    Simon de Montfort died on August 4, 1265 at the battle of Evesham, and was buried at the nearby Evesham Abbey. De Montfort and his army were awaiting the army led by his second son, Simon. He saw his son's banners flying high and began to hope, with the two armies they had a fighting chance to claim England. However, his son had been ambushed, and Prince Edward, Henry's son, led the army carrying de Montfort's stolen banners. When de Montfort realized the truth, he said "May God have mercy on our souls because our bodies are theirs." On hearing that his son Henry had been killed, he replied, "Then it is time to die." From within the church of Evesham, de Montfort and his army led a final charge to their death. After a charge uphill against superior forces, Simon's army was completely destroyed; the battle was described as the "murder of Evesham, for battle it was none". His last words were said to have been "Thank God". Simon's body was cut up and different parts sent to the Lords w...

    In the years that followed his death, Simon de Montfort's grave was frequently visited by pilgrims. There was an attempt to canonize him; this was not carried out however, due to opposition by the English monarchy at the time. Today, de Montfort is mostly remembered for calling the first directly elected parliament and is regarded as one of the fathers of modern democracy. He may have a more romantic legacy; Roger Godberd, one of de Montfort's captains who survived Evesham, fought on until his capture in 1272 as a bandit or rebel in and around the Sherwood Forest area. Godberd is one candidate for being the character around whom the Robin Hood legend is based. Napoleon Bonaparte described Simon de Montfort as "one of the greatest Englishmen". Various local honors were dedicated to his memory, and he has become eponymous several times over. De Monfort University in Leicester is named after him, as is the nearby De Montfort Hall, a concert venue. A statue of de Montfort is one of four...

    Simon de Montfort and Eleanor of Leicesterhad seven children, many of whom were notable in their own right 1. Henry de Montfort- (November 1238 - 1265) 2. Simon the Younger de Montfort- (April 1240 - 1271) 3. Amaury de Montfort, Canon of York- (1242/43 - 1300) 4. Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola - (1244 - 1288) Elizabeth Woodville, Queen Consort of Edward IV of England, was one of Guy's descendants through his daughter, Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola. 5. Joanna de Montfort - (born and died in Bordeaux between 1248 - 1251) 6. Richard de Montfort- (died 1266) 7. Eleanor de Montfort - (1252 - 1282) She married Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of Wales, honoring an agreement that had been made between Earl Simon and Llywelyn. Eleanor, Lady of Wales, died on June 19, 1282 at the royal Welsh home at Abergwyngregyn, on the north coast of Gwynedd, giving birth to a daughter, Gwenllian of Wales. After Llywelyn's death on December 11, 1282, Gwenllian was captured by King Edward I and spent...

  5. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester | Historica Wiki ...

    historica.fandom.com › wiki › Simon_de_Montfort,_6th

    Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester (1208-4 August 1265) was a French-English nobleman who led the rebellion against King Henry III of England during the Second Barons' War of 1263-64. He was briefly the de facto ruler of England, and he called two Parliaments, the first of which stripped the King of unlimited authority, and the second of which included ordinary citizens from the towns ...

  6. Simon de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester (1208–1265 ...

    ancestors.familysearch.org › en › LZGP-4VJ

    When Simon de Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester was born on 30 May 1208, in Montfort-l'Amaury, Yvelines, Île-de-France, France, his father, Simon IV de Monfort, was 33 and his mother, Alix de Montmorency, was 34. He married Eleanor of England, Countess of Leicester on 7 January 1238, in Palace of Westminster, Westminster, Middlesex, England.

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  7. Who was Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester? Everything ...

    www.thefamouspeople.com › profiles › simon-de

    Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, was born in 1208 in Montfort-l'Amaury, a commune located near Paris, France. His father, Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester, was the lord of Montfort and a well-known crusader. His mother, Alix de Montmorency, was a devout woman. Simon was his parents’ fourth child and third son, having three ...

  8. Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester - English Monarchs

    www.englishmonarchs.co.uk › plantagenet_58

    Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester On the loss of the Duchy of Normandy, King John granted the Leicester estates and title to Simon's father's cousin Ranulf, Earl of Chester. De Montfort's eldest son Amaury attempted to regain the earldom but finally agreed to allow his younger brother Simon to claim it in return for all family ...

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  10. Simon de Montfort (c.1175 - 1218) - Genealogy

    www.geni.com › people › Simon-IV-de-Montfort-5th

    May 05, 2020 · Not to be confused with Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. Simon IV de Montfort, Seigneur de Montfort-l'Amaury, 5th Earl of Leicester (1160 – 25 June 1218), also known as Simon de Montfort the elder, was a French nobleman who took part in the Fourth Crusade (1202 - 1204) and was a prominent leader of the Albigensian Crusade.

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