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  1. Sirimavo Bandaranaike, in full Sirimavo Ratwatte Dias Bandaranaike, also called Sirimavo R.D. Bandaranaike, (born April 17, 1916, Ratnapura, Ceylon [now Sri Lanka]—died October 10, 2000, Colombo, Sri Lanka), stateswoman who, upon her party’s victory in the 1960 general election in Ceylon (later Sri Lanka ), became the world’s first woman prime …

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  2. Bandaranaike was at home in Rosmead Place on the morning of 25 September 1959, when S.W.R.D. Bandaranaike was shot multiple times by a Buddhist monk, disgruntled over what he believed to be lack of support for traditional medicine. [21] [32] [28] Bandaranaike accompanied her husband to hospital, where he succumbed to his wounds the following day.

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    Sirimavo was raised in a wealthy Sinhalese family. In 1940, she married the politician Solomon Bandaranaike, leader of the Sri Lanka Freedom Party and Prime Minister between 1956 and his assassination in 1959. At the request of senior party members, Mrs Bandaranaike accepted the leadership of the party and the following year won the general electio...

    A staunch socialist, Bandaranaike continued her husband's policies of nationalizing key sectors of the economy, such as banking and insurance. Unfortunately, she was on a roller-coaster ride from the moment she took office and within a year of her 1960 election victory she declared a state of emergency. This followed a civil disobedience campaign b...

    Known to her fellow Sri Lankans as "Mrs. B," she could skillfully use popular emotion to boost her support, frequently bursting into tears as she pledged to continue her dead husband's policies. He, Prime Minister Solomon Bandaranaike, was shot dead by a man dressed as a Buddhist monk in 1959. Her opponents and critics called her the "weeping widow...

    By 1976, Bandaranaike was more respected abroad than at home. Her great triumph that year was to become chairman of the Non-Aligned Movement and host the largest heads of state conference the country had ever seen. Despite her high standing internationally, she was losing Sri Lankan support rapidly amid allegations of corruption and against the bac...

    Bandaranaike is mainly remembered for policies that alienated that Tamil minority and fueled the confict that has waged in Sri Lanka since 1983. However, she can not solely be blamed for causing the civil war, since her policies were widely supported by a majority of the population through the electoral ballot. The wish to promote and strengthen he...

    Liswood, Laura A. Women World Leaders: Fifteen Great Politicians Tell Their Stories. London: Pandora, 1995. ISBN 9780044409045
    Manor, James. The Expedient Utopian: Bandaranaike and Ceylon. Cambridge [England]: Cambridge University Press, 1989. ISBN 0521371910
    Opfell, Olga S. Women Prime Ministers and Presidents. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co, 1993. ISBN 9780899507903
  3. Sirimavo Bandaranaike was born in April 17, 1916 as the eldest child of Mr. Barnes Ratwatte, the Disawe of Sabaragamuwa and Mrs Mahawalathenna Kumarihamy, a traditional Kandyan elitist family that enjoyed a profound social command in the area. She had four brothers and two sisters and was educated at St. Bridget’s Convent in Colombo.

  4. Biography Sirimavo Ratwatte Dias Bandaranaike Sirimavo Bandaranaike was born in April 17, 1916 as the eldest child of Mr. Barnes Ratwatte, the Disawe of Sabaragamuwa and Mrs Mahawalathenna Kumarihamy, a traditional Kandyan elitist family that enjoyed a profound social command in the area. She had four brothers and two sisters and was educated at…

  5. Nov 21, 2020 · Sirimavo Bandaranaike was elected the modern world's first female head of government in 1960 when she became prime minister of Sri Lanka, or Ceylon as it was known then.

  6. Sirimavo Bandaranaike was born on 17 April 1916, as Sirimavo Ratwatte. Her family was part of the aristocracy. She was a Buddhist, but went to school at a convent in Colombo, Sri Lanka, where she was taught by Roman Catholic nuns. In 1940, she married Solomon Bandaranaike, who was a member of parliament at the time.

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