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  1. Nov 17, 2020 · The big bang is how astronomers explain the way the universe began. It is the idea that the universe began as just a single point, then expanded and stretched to grow as large as it is right now (and it could still be stretching).

    • What Triggered the Big Bang? | How the Universe Works
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    • Origins of the Universe 101 | National Geographic
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    • Best of The Big Bang Theory season 9
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    • Supernatural Season 15 Episode 15 [S15-E15] English Subtitle
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  2. Big Bang - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Bang

    The Big Bang theory is a cosmological model of the observable universe from the earliest known periods through its subsequent large-scale evolution. The model describes how the universe expanded from an initial state of extremely high density and high temperature, and offers a comprehensive explanation for a broad range of observed phenomena, including the abundance of light elements, the ...

  3. May 01, 2006 · Created by Chuck Lorre, Bill Prady. With Johnny Galecki, Jim Parsons, Kaley Cuoco, Simon Helberg. A woman who moves into an apartment across the hall from two brilliant but socially awkward physicists shows them how little they know about life outside of the laboratory.

    • (709.7K)
    • 31 sec
    • TV-14
  4. The Big Bang | Science Mission Directorate

    science.nasa.gov/.../what-powered-the-big-bang
    • Background Radiation
    • Missions Study Cosmic Background Radiation
    • Inflation
    • Dark Energy

    According to the theories of physics, if we were to look at the Universe one second after the Big Bang, what we would see is a 10-billion degree sea of neutrons, protons, electrons, anti-electrons (positrons), photons, and neutrinos. Then, as time went on, we would see the Universe cool, the neutrons either decaying into protons and electrons or combining with protons to make deuterium (an isotope of hydrogen). As it continued to cool, it would eventually reach the temperature where electrons combined with nuclei to form neutral atoms. Before this "recombination" occurred, the Universe would have been opaque because the free electrons would have caused light (photons) to scatter the way sunlight scatters from the water droplets in clouds. But when the free electrons were absorbed to form neutral atoms, the Universe suddenly became transparent. Those same photons - the afterglow of the Big Bang known as cosmic background radiation- can be observed today.

    NASA has launched two missions to study the cosmic background radiation, taking "baby pictures" of the Universe only 400,000 years after it was born. The first of these was the Cosmic Background Explorer(COBE). In 1992, the COBE team announced that they had mapped the primordial hot and cold spots in cosmic background radiation. These spots are related to the gravitational field in the early Universe and form the seeds of the giant clusters of galaxies that stretch hundreds of millions of light years across the Universe. This work earned NASA's Dr. John C. Mather and George F. Smoot of the University of California the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics. The second mission to examine the cosmic background radiation was the Wilkinson Microware Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). With greatly improved resolution compared to COBE, WMAP surveyed the entire sky, measuring temperature differences of the microwave radiation that is nearly uniformly distributed across the Universe. The picture shows a map of...

    One problem that arose from the original COBE results, and that persists with the higher-resolution WMAP data, was that the Universe was toohomogeneous. How could pieces of the Universe that had never been in contact with each other have come to equilibrium at the very same temperature? This and other cosmological problems could be solved, however, if there had been a very short period immediately after the Big Bang where the Universe experienced an incredible burst of expansion called "inflation." For this inflation to have taken place, the Universe at the time of the Big Bang must have been filled with an unstable form of energy whose nature is not yet known. Whatever its nature, the inflationary model predicts that this primordial energy would have been unevenly distributed in space due to a kind of quantum noise that arose when the Universe was extremely small. This pattern would have been transferred to the matter of the Universe and would show up in the photons that began stre...

    During the years following Hubble and COBE, the picture of the Big Bang gradually became clearer. But in 1996, observations of very distant supernovae required a dramatic change in the picture. It had always been assumed that the matter of the Universe would slow its rate of expansion. Mass creates gravity, gravity creates pull, the pulling must slow the expansion. But supernovae observations showed that the expansion of the Universe, rather than slowing, is accelerating. Something, not like matter and not like ordinary energy, is pushing the galaxies apart. This "stuff" has been dubbed dark energy, but to give it a name is not to understand it. Whether dark energy is a type of dynamical fluid, heretofore unknown to physics, or whether it is a property of the vacuum of empty space, or whether it is some modification to general relativity is not yet known.

  5. What Is The Big Bang? - ScienceAlert

    www.sciencealert.com/big-bang

    The Big Bang is a theory describing the expansion of our Universe from a point of origin roughly 13.8 billion years ago.. This hypothetical starting point of everything was an infinite concentration of energy referred to as a singularity.

  6. What Is the Big Bang Theory? | Space

    www.space.com/25126-big-bang-theory.html

    The Big Bang Theory is the leading explanation about how the universe began. At its simplest, it talks about the universe as we know it starting with a small singularity, then inflating over the ...

  7. The Big Bang and the Origin of Everything

    www.thoughtco.com/origin-of-the-universe-3072255

    Jan 10, 2020 · The Big Bang is the name given to the birth event of the universe. The Big Bang is thought to have occurred when something kicked off the expansion of a tiny singularity, some 13.8 billion years ago. Light from shortly after the Big Bang is detectable as the cosmic microwave radiation (CMB).

  8. The Big Bang (2011 film) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Bang_(2011_film)

    The Big Bang is a 2011 American action thriller film written by Erik Jendresen and directed by Tony Krantz, starring Antonio Banderas and Sienna Guillory Contents 1 Synopsis

    • Erik Jendresen, Richard Rionda Del Castro
    • ‹See TfM›, February 3, 2011 (Bahrain), May 13, 2011 (United States)
  9. The Big Bang Theory: How the Universe Began | Live Science

    www.livescience.com/65700-big-bang-theory.html

    Jun 12, 2019 · "The Big Bang is a really bad term," said Paul Steinhardt, a cosmologist at Princeton. "The Big Stretch would capture the right idea." The mental image of an explosion causes all kinds of ...

  10. What happened before the Big Bang? | Live Science

    www.livescience.com/65254-what-happened-before...

    Apr 17, 2019 · The Big Bang is commonly thought of as the start of it all: About 13.8 billion years ago, the observable universe went boom and expanded into being.

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