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  1. The Bridge at Remagen is a 1969 DeLuxe Color war film starring George Segal, Ben Gazzara and Robert Vaughn in Panavision. The film, which was directed by John Guillermin, was shot on location in Czechoslovakia.

    The Bridge at Remagen - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bridge_at_Remagen
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  3. The Bridge at Remagen (1969) - IMDb

    www.imdb.com/title/tt0064110

    In the last days of World War II, the Allied Army desperately searched for a bridgehead across the impenetrable Rhine River, in order to launch a major assault into the center of Germany. "Bridge at Remagen" tells the true story of the battle for this last bridgehead, from both the German and American perspective.

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    • John Guillermin
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  4. The Bridge at Remagen - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bridge_at_Remagen

    The Bridge at Remagen is a 1969 DeLuxe Color war film starring George Segal, Ben Gazzara and Robert Vaughn in Panavision. The film, which was directed by John Guillermin, was shot on location in Czechoslovakia.

  5. Ludendorff Bridge - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludendorff_Bridge

    The Ludendorff Bridge (sometimes referred to as the Bridge at Remagen) was in early March 1945 a critical remaining bridge across the river Rhine in Germany when it was captured during the Battle of Remagen by United States Army forces during the closing weeks of World War II.

    • 1916
    • Rhine
  6. Watch The Bridge at Remagen | Prime Video

    www.amazon.com/Bridge-at-Remagen-George-Segal/dp/...

    The Bridge at Remagen (541) IMDb 6.7 1 h 56 min 1969 R George Segal, Ben Gazzara, and Robert Vaughn star in this tale of a desperate battle in the waning days of World War II.

  7. Bridge at Remagen in World War II - ThoughtCo

    www.thoughtco.com/world-war-ii-bridge-at-remagen...

    Mar 04, 2019 · The capture of the Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen occurred on March 7-8, 1945, during the closing stages of World War II (1939-1945). In early 1945, American forces pressed towards the west bank of the Rhine River during Operation Lumberjack. In response, German forces were ordered to destroy the bridges over the river.

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  8. Capturing the Bridge at Remagen, 1945

    www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/remagen.htm
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    Winding its way from Switzerland to the North Sea, the Rhine River has historically stood as a natural barrier defending the German heartland that lies beyond it. Since the days of the Roman Empire, the river's cold, wide and swift waters have proven to be a formidable obstacle to any aggressor intending to cross it. These facts were well known to the Allied commanders as their forces continued their assault toward the German interior in March 1945. The crossing of the Rhine would be a difficult and costly task.

    As the Allied armies approached, Hitler ordered the destruction of all the bridges that spanned the Rhine. By March 7, they all had been, except one - the Ludendorff railroad bridge at the little resort town of Remagen a few miles to the southeast of Cologne. On that day Lady Luck smiled on the Allies. At about 1 PM an American reconnaissance patrol reached the wooded hills overlooking the river at Remagen, and to their surprise, discovered the bridge still intact. Then the race began. . . .By nightfall scores of tanks, trucks by the hundreds were moving up and across the Rhine. All roads leading to Remagen were packed with American troops and trucks and armor and guns. Soldiers who had been ready to drop from fatigue stepped on the accelerator, broad grins splitting their begrimed faces. The Ludendorf bridge had become a one-way street, east-bound.\\"

    The Americans quickly launched a full-scale assault on the bridge while the defending Germans scrambled to detonate the explosive charges that had been set to destroy it. The fighting was fierce as both sides realized what was at stake. The American soldiers scrambled under withering gun fire from girder to girder returning fire and ripping the explosives from the bridge's super structure. The German's were successful in detonating some explosives - but not enough to destroy the bridge. By 4 PM - approximately four minutes after the assault began - the Americans had reached the other side of the river and secured the bridge. When informed, 1st Army commander Omar Bradley responded: \\"Hot dog . . .this will bust 'em wide open. Shove everything you can across!\\" Traffic was still moving across the Ludendorf Bridge. On the other side locomotives puffed, awaiting orders to pull out. Lt. Col. Leonard Engemann of Minneapolis, in command of a reconnaissance party, was determined to save this bridge if it was at all possible. So, at 3:50 oclock, a platoon led by Lieut. Emmett Burrows of New York City, sped down the slope to the bridge entrance. There was a flurry of shooting as the Germans, taken completely by surprise, scurried about trying to organize a defense. A German gun was knocked out, some German soldiers killed. Then the Yanks, crouching low against machine gun fire coming from the bridge towers, ran out onto the bridge. Just as they stepped on the span, an explosion occurred three-quarters of the way down the bridge. The Germans were setting off demolition charges, and the men thought surely their chance was gone. But no, only slight damage was done. They raced on.

    \\"While we were running across the bridge. . . I spotted this lieutenant, standing out there completely exposed to the machine gun fire that was pretty heavy by this time. He was cutting wires and kicking the German demolition charges off the bridge with his feet!\\" While we were running across the bridge and, man, it may have been only 250 yards but it seemed like 250 miles to us I spotted this lieutenant, standing out there completely exposed to the machine gun fire that was pretty heavy by this time. He was cutting wires and kicking the German demolition charges off the bridge with his feet! Boy that took plenty of guts. He's the one who saved the bridge and made the whole thing possible the kinda guy I'd like to know.

    Everett Holles was a NBC Radio war correspondent accompanying the troops that made the assault over the Rhine. He describes what happened as the American force approached the bridge:

    Later, from prisoners, the Americans learned that the Germans planned to blow up the span at precisely four oclock. But the German officer assigned the demolition job was drunk when the American tanks reached Remagen. This officer, a lieutenant, had gone into the town of Eprel as the Yanks approached and spread the word boastfully that the bridge goes up at four oclock this afternoon.

    This eye-witness account appears in Holles, Everett, Unconditional Surrender (1945); Hechler, Karl, The Bridge at Remagen (1957); Turner, Barry, Countdown to Victory (2004).

  9. The Bridge at Remagen (1969) - Full Cast & Crew - IMDb

    www.imdb.com/title/tt0064110/fullcredits

    The Bridge at Remagen (1969) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more.

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