Yahoo Web Search

Search results

  1. Signature. Tristan Tzara ( French: [tʁistɑ̃ dzaʁa]; Romanian: [trisˈtan ˈt͡sara]; born Samuel or Samy Rosenstock, also known as S. Samyro; 28 April [ O.S. 16 April] 1896 [1] – 25 December 1963) was a Romanian avant-garde poet, essayist and performance artist. Also active as a journalist, playwright, literary and art critic, composer ...

    • Romanian
    • 1912–1963
  2. 1 day ago · Tristan Tzara (born 1896, Moineşti, Rom.—died December 1963, Paris) was a Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as the founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts, the purpose of which was the demolition of all the values of modern civilization.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
    • Early Period
    • Swiss Period
    • Paris Period
    • Surrealism
    • The Legacy of Tristan Tzara

    Tristan Tzara, born Samuel Rosenstock, came from a Romanian family with Jewish roots. A highly original thinker by nature, his early years were marked by feelings of boredom with the small, agricultural town in which he lived. While attending school in Bucharest he became captivated by Symbolism, and co-founded the magazine Simbolul with Ion Vinea ...

    While Europe exploded into war, Tzara and Marcel Janco linked up with a group of pacifist artists and radicals, including Hugo Ball, Emmy Hennings, Richard Huelsenbeck, Hans (Jean) Arp, and Sophie Taeuber-Arp to form the Dada group. Influenced by a range of avant-garde movements, such as Cubism, Futurism, Constructivism, and Expressionism, they bel...

    Tzara relocated to Paris in 1920, sparking an exciting blitz of ideas, demonstrations, exhibitions, performances, manifestos and journals among the Parisian avant-garde, including Andre Breton, Louis Aragon, Philippe Soupault, Paul Éluard, Jacques Rigaut, and Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, known as the "Dada Spring." He wrote articles for Breton's Li...

    By 1929 Tzara and Breton had reconciled and there is no question that Breton's First Manifesto of Surrealism, promoting the unconscious, the primitive, automatism, chance, and the blurring of imagination and reality, was clearly influenced by Tzara's ideas. After publishing his Second Surrealist Manifesto, Breton noted that their earlier split "was...

    Due to the domination of Surrealism and Breton's dogmatic stance, Dada's reputation waned and by the 1940s it had disappeared completely. As the former Dada member Hans Richter noted: "Surrealism devoured and digested Dada." For a time it seemed that Breton had devoured Tzara too but in the 1950s there was a resurgence of interest in the subject. R...

    • Romanian
    • April 16, 1896
    • Moinesti, Romania
    • December 24, 1963
  3. www.moma.org › artists › 13398Tristan Tzara | MoMA

    Tristan Tzara (French: [tʁistɑ̃ dzaʁa]; Romanian: [trisˈtan ˈt͡sara]; born Samuel or Samy Rosenstock, also known as S. Samyro; 28 April [O.S. 16 April] 1896 – 25 December 1963) was a Romanian avant-garde poet, essayist and performance artist.

  4. Tristan Tzara was born in 1896, in Moineşti, Romania. He is best remembered as a cofounder and theoretician of Dadaism, an intellectual movement of the World War I era whose adherents espoused intentional irrationality and urged individuals to reject traditional artistic, historical, and religious values.

  5. People also ask

  6. Moinesti, Romania, 1896–Paris, 1963. Tristan Tzara’s importance for the history of modern art is split equally between his creative output as a poet, playwright, and performer and his activities as a publisher, manifesto writer, and organizer. As a collector, he acquired large holdings of photographs, drawings, and collages by an ...

  7. The poet Tristan Tzara was a strong advocate of the international Dada movement, but his Dada Manifesto of 1918 (which you can read in full here) appears to be complete nonsense. It is, in fact, just that — but in a really interesting way that perfectly serves the goals of the Dada movement.

  1. People also search for