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  1. Valdemar II of Denmark - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valdemar_II_of_Denmark

    Valdemar II (9 May 1170 – 28 March 1241), called Valdemar the Victorious or Valdemar the Conqueror (Valdemar Sejr), was the King of Denmark from 1202 until his death in 1241. The nickname Sejr is a later invention and was not used during the King's own lifetime.

  2. Valdemar II | king of Denmark | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Valdemar-II

    Valdemar II, king of Denmark (1202–41) who, between 1200 and 1219, extended the Danish Baltic empire from Schleswig in the west to include lands as far east as Estonia. In his later years he worked to unify Denmark’s legal and administrative systems. The son and brother, respectively, of the Danish

  3. Valdemar II "The Victorious", King of Denmark

    www.geni.com/people/Valdemar-II-The-Victorious...

    May 16, 2020 · Valdemar II (9 May 1170 or 28 June 1170 – 28 March 1241), called Valdemar the Victorious or Valdemar the Conqueror (Valdemar Sejr), was the King of Denmark from 1202 until his death in 1241. The nickname Sejr is a later invention and was not used during the King's own lifetime.

  4. Bishop Valdemar was an ambitious man and disguised his own ambitions as young Valdemar's. When in 1192 Bishop Valdemar was named Prince-Archbishop of Bremen, his plot to overthrow King Canute VI with the help of German nobility and sit on Denmark's throne himself was revealed.

    • 9 May 1170, Ribe, Esbjerg Kommune, Syddanmark, Denmark
    • Sankt Bendts Kirke, Ringsted, Ringsted Kommune, Sjælland, Denmark
    • 29 Mar 1241 (aged 70), Vordingborg, Vordingborg Kommune, Sjælland, Denmark
    • 96905003 · View Source
    • Background
    • Reign
    • Marriages
    • in Memoriam
    • External Links

    He was the sec­ond son of King Valde­mar I of Den­mark and Sophia of Minsk, the daugh­ter of Richeza of Poland, Queen Dowa­ger of Swe­den and Volo­dar Giebovich, Prince of Minsk. When his fa­ther died, young Valde­mar was only twelve years old. He was named Duke of South­ern Jut­land (Latin: dux slesvicensis, lit­er­ally Duchy of Schleswig duke), rep­re­sented by the re­gent Bishop Valde­mar Knud­sen, the il­le­git­i­mate son of King Canute V of Den­mark. Bishop Valde­mar was an am­bi­tious man and dis­guised his own am­bi­tions as young Valde­mar's. When Bishop Valde­mar was named Prince-Arch­bishop of Bre­men in 1192, his plot to over­throw King Canute VI of Den­mark(elder brother of Duke Valde­mar) with the help of the Ger­man no­bil­ity and place him­self on Den­mark's throne, was re­vealed. Duke Valde­mar re­al­ized the threat Bishop Valde­mar rep­re­sented. He thus in­vited the Arch­bishop to meet him in Aaben­raa in 1192. The Bishop then fled to Swedish Nor­way to avoid ar­re...

    Duke Valde­mar was sub­se­quently pro­claimed king at the Jut­land As­sem­bly (land­st­ing). The nearby Holy Roman Em­pire was torn by civil war due to hav­ing two ri­vals con­test­ing for its throne, Otto IV, House of Guelf, and King Philip, House of Ho­hen­staufen. Valde­mar II al­lied him­self with Otto IV against Phillip. In 1203 Valde­mar in­vaded and con­quered Ly­beck and Hol­stein, adding them to the ter­ri­to­ries con­trolled by Den­mark. In 1204 he at­tempted to in­flu­ence the out­come of the Nor­we­gian suc­ces­sion by lead­ing a Dan­ish fleet and army to Viken in Nor­way in sup­port of Er­ling Stein­vegg, the pre­tender to the Nor­we­gian throne. This re­sulted in the sec­ond BaglerWar which lasted until 1208. The ques­tion of the Nor­we­gian suc­ces­sion was tem­porar­ily set­tled and the Nor­we­gian king owed al­le­giance to the king of Den­mark. In 1207, a ma­jor­ity of Bremian ca­pit­u­lars again elected Bishop Valde­mar as Prince-Arch­bishop, while a mi­nor­ity, le...

    Be­fore his first mar­riage, Valde­mar had been be­trothed to Rixa of Bavaria, daugh­ter of the Duke of Sax­ony. When that arrange­ment failed, he mar­ried first Dag­mar of Bo­hemia, also known as Mar­garet of Bo­hemia, in 1205. She was the daugh­ter of King Ot­tokar I of Bo­hemia by his first wife, Ade­laide of Meis­sen, who quickly won over the hearts of the Danes. By this mar­riage, Valde­mar had a son, Valde­mar the Young, whom he el­e­vated as co-king at Schleswig in 1218. Un­for­tu­nately, Prince Valde­mar was ac­ci­den­tally shot while hunt­ing at Refsnæs in North Jut­land in 1231. Queen Dag­mar died in child­birth in 1212. Old folk bal­lads say that on her death bed, she begged Valde­mar to marry Kirsten, the daugh­ter of Karl von Rise, and not the "beau­ti­ful flower", Beren­garia of Por­tu­gal (Bengerd). In other words, she pre­dicted Beren­garia's sons' fight over the throne would bring trou­ble to Den­mark. After Mar­garet's death, in order to build good re­la­tions with...

    Valde­mar en­joys a cen­tral po­si­tion in Dan­ish his­tory be­cause of his po­si­tion as "the king of Dan­nebrog" and as a leg­is­la­tor. To pos­ter­ity, the civil wars and dis­so­lu­tion that fol­lowed his death made him ap­pear to be the last king of a golden age. Since 1912, June 15 has of­fi­cially been called Valde­mars­dag (Valde­mar's Day). The date now be­longs to the group of 33 Dan­ish an­nual Flag Days where Dan­nebrog is raised in celebration.[citation needed] The 1997 film Eye of the Eagle was about a fic­tional story about Valde­mar the Young. His fa­ther Valde­mar was played by Lars Lohmann. In the film Arn: The Knight Tem­plar Valde­mar was por­trayed by actor Mads Mikkelsen.[citation needed] In Es­ton­ian cap­i­tal Tallinn at Toom­pea lo­cated Dan­ish King's gar­den, mark­ing place where Dan­ish flag Dan­nebrog was born. Every year on 15 June, Dan­nebrog or the Day of the Dan­ish Flagis cel­e­brated in the garden.

    Media related to Valdemar II of Denmarkat Wikimedia Commons
    Valdemar II garden in Tallinn, Estonia
  5. Valdemar II of Denmark - Infogalactic: the planetary ...

    infogalactic.com/info/Valdemar_II_of_Denmark

    Valdemar II (9 May 1170 or 28 June 1170 – 28 March 1241), called Valdemar the Victorious or Valdemar the Conqueror (Valdemar Sejr), was the King of Denmark from 1202 until his death in 1241. The nickname Sejr is a later invention and was not used during the King's own lifetime.

  6. Valdemar II of Denmark | Historica Wiki | Fandom

    historica.fandom.com/wiki/Valdemar_II_of_Denmark

    Valdemar II "the Conqueror" of Denmark (9 May 1170-28 March 1241) was King of Denmark from 12 November 1202 to 28 March 1241, succeeding Canute VI and preceding Eric IV. Biography . Valdemar Sejr was born in Ribe, Jutland, Denmark on 9 May 1170, the second son of King Valdemar I of Denmark and the brother of Canute VI of Denmark.

  7. Valdemar II of Denmark (d. 1241) - The Crusades

    erenow.net/postclassical/crusades/936.php

    Valdemar II of Denmark (d. 1241) Valdemar II Sejr (the Victorious) was king of Denmark (1202-1241) in succession to his brother Knud VI. Valdemar was born around 1168, the second son of King Valdemar I and Sophia of Minsk.

  8. Valdemar II of Denmark - WikiMili, The Best Wikipedia Reader

    wikimili.com/en/Valdemar_II_of_Denmark

    Valdemar II (9 May 1170 – 28 March 1241), called Valdemar the Victorious or Valdemar the Conqueror (Valdemar Sejr), was the King of Denmark from 1202 until his death in 1241. The nickname Sejr is a later invention and was not used during the King's own lifetime. Sejr means victory in Danish.

  9. Valdemar the Great, King of Denmark - geni family tree

    www.geni.com/people/Valdemar-the-Great-King-of...

    Notes : Valdemar 'the Great' was allied to Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa of Germany. He defeated the heathen Wends in Estonia and on the island of Ruegen (the destruction of the city-fortress of Arkona and the four-faced god Svantevit in 1169) and gained for Denmark her first Baltic possessions.