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  1. Vasily I of Moscow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasiliy_I_of_Moscow

    Vasily I Dmitriyevich (Russian: Василий I Дмитриевич; 30 December 1371 – 27 February 1425) was the Grand Prince of Moscow (r. 1389—1425), heir of Dmitry Donskoy (r. 1359—1389). He ruled as a Golden Horde vassal between 1389-1395, and again in 1412-1425.

    • 19 May 1389 – 27 February 1425
    • Dmitry I
  2. Vasily I | grand prince of Moscow | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Vasily-I

    Vasily I, in full Vasily Dmitriyevich, (born 1371—died February 1425, Moscow), grand prince of Moscow from 1389 to 1425.. While still a youth, Vasily, who was the eldest son of Grand Prince Dmitry Donskoy (ruled Moscow 1359–89), travelled to the Tatar khan Tokhtamysh (1383) to obtain the Khan’s patent for his father to rule the Russian lands as the grand prince of Vladimir.

  3. Vasili Mikhailovich of Tver (c1304-1368) | Familypedia | Fandom

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Vasili_Mikhailovich...

    Vasili Mikhailovich of Tver - Василий Михайлович (князь тверской) was born 1304 to Mikhail Yaroslavich of Tver (1271-1318) and Anna Dmitriyevna of Kashin (c1280-1368) and died 1368 of unspecified causes. He married Yelena Ivanovna . Notable ancestors includeCharlemagne (747-814), Alfred the Great (849-899). Ancestors are fromRussia, Ukraine, Sweden, Belarus ...

    • 1304
    • Mikhail Yaroslavich of Tver (1271-1318)
    • 1368
    • Anna Dmitriyevna of Kashin (c1280-1368)
  4. Vasily Mikhailovich I, photo, biography

    persona.rin.ru/eng/view/f/0/23103/vasily-mikhail...

    Vsevolod learned of the deed of his uncle, went to meet him, along with Khan's ambassador and robbed him. Vasili had to go back to Kashin. Only in 1348 the Bishop Theodore managed to reconcile the princes. Vsevolod lost Tver Vasily, and both are stronger with each cross with a kiss.

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  6. Category:Vasily I of Tver - Wikimedia Commons

    commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Vasily_I_of_Tver

    Media in category "Vasily I of Tver" The following 2 files are in this category, out of 2 total. Facial Chronicle - b.07, p.365 - Wedding of Vasily Mikhailovich of Tver.jpg 433 × 794; 391 KB

  7. Tver | historical principality, Russia | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/place/Tver-historical...

    Although Tver suffered from civil war during Vasily’s reign (1346–67), it was strong enough by 1368, under Michael II, son of Alexander, to join Lithuania and challenge Moscow’s dominant position. Dmitry Donskoy decisively defeated Michael in 1375 and forced Tver to acknowledge Moscow’s suzerainty.

  8. Boris of Tver - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_of_Tver

    The year 1425 was devastating for the Principality of Tver. After the sudden death of Vasily I of Moscow, in the same year plague killed three Grand Dukes of Tver: Ivan Mikhailovich, Boris' father Aleksander Ivanovich and brother Jury Aleksandrovich. Thus Boris Aleksandrovich became the ruler of the principality.

  9. Prince of Tver - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_of_Tver

    The title of Prince of Tver was borne by the head of the branch of the Rurikid dynasty that ruled the Principality of Tver. In 1247 Tver was allocated to Grand Prince Alexander Nevsky, and became an independent principality. In 1252, the principality passed to his brother Yaroslav, who became the ancestor of the Tver dynasty of princes.

  10. Vasili IV of Russia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_IV

    Vasili IV (Russian: Василий IV Иванович Шуйский, Vasiliy Ivanovich Shuisky, 22 September 1552 – 12 September 1612), also called Basil IV, was Tsar of Russia between 1606 and 1610 after the murder of False Dmitriy I. His reign fell during the Time of Troubles.

  11. List of Russian monarchs - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Russian_monarchs

    The vast territory known today as Russia covers an area that has been known historically by various names, including Rus', Kievan Rus', the Grand Duchy of Moscow, the Czardom of Russia and the Russian Empire, and the sovereigns of these many nations and throughout their histories have used likewise as wide a range of titles in their positions as chief magistrates of a country.