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  1. Vasily Vasiliyevich, known as Vasily II the Blind, was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history. At one point, Vasily was captured and blinded by his opponents, yet eventually managed to reclaim the throne. Due to his disability, he made his son, Ivan III the Great, his co-ruler in his late years.

    Vasily II of Moscow - Wikipedia

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_II_of_Moscow
  2. Vasily II of Moscow - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_II_of_Moscow

    Vasily Vasiliyevich, known as Vasily II the Blind, was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history. At one point, Vasily was captured and blinded by his opponents, yet eventually managed to reclaim the throne. Due to his disability, he made his son, Ivan III the Great, his co-ruler in his late years.

  3. Vasily II | grand prince of Moscow | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/biography/Vasily-II

    Vasily II, grand prince of Moscow from 1425 to 1462. Although the 10-year-old Vasily II was named by his father Vasily I (ruled Moscow 1389–1425) to succeed him as the grand prince of Moscow and of Vladimir, Vasily’s rule was challenged by his uncle Yury and his cousins Vasily the Squint-Eyed and

  4. Vasily II of Moscow Biography | Pantheon

    pantheon.world/profile/person/Vasily_II_of_Moscow

    Vasily II of Moscow. Vasily Vasiliyevich (Russian: Василий Васильевич; 10 March 1415 – 27 March 1462), known as Vasily II the Blind (Василий II Тёмный), was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign (1425–1462) was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history.

  5. Vasily II of Moscow - geni family tree

    www.geni.com/people/Vasily-II-of-Moscow/...

    Vasily II was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign (1425-1462) was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history. Vasily II was the youngest son of Vasily I of Moscow by Sophia of Lithuania, the only daughter of Vytautas the Great, and the only son to survive his father (his elder brother Ivan died in 1417 at the age of 22).

    • Vasily I, Grand Prince of Moscow, Sofia, Queen consort of Moscow
  6. Vasily II of Moscow

    hyperleap.com/topic/Vasily_II_of_Moscow

    The Muscovite Civil War, or Great Feudal War, was a prolonged conflict that cast its shadow over the entire reign of Vasily II of Moscow (from 1425 to 1453). After Vasili's death in 1425 she became regent for their ten-year-old son Vasili II. He was the chief orchestrator of the Muscovite Civil War against his nephew, Vasily II, in the course of which he twice took Moscow, in 1433 and 1434.

  7. Vasily Vasiliyevich (Russian: Василий Васильевич; 10 March 1415–27 March 1462), known as Vasily II the Blind (Василий II Темный), was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign (1425–1462) was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history.

  8. May 18, 2019 · Vasily II Vasiliyevich Tyomniy (Blind) (Василий II Васильевич Тёмный in Russian) (10 March 1415 – 27 March 1462, Moscow) was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign (1425–1462) was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history. Later reign and policies

  9. Vasili II Vasilyevich of Moscow (1415-1462) | Familypedia ...

    familypedia.wikia.org/wiki/Vasili_II_Vasilyevich...

    Vasili II Vasilyevich of Moscow (1415-1462) was born on an unknown date. Vasili II Vasiliyevich Tyomniy (the Blind or the Dark) (Russian: Василий II Васильевич Тёмный) (10 March 1415 – 27 March 1462, Moscow) was the Grand Prince of Moscow whose long reign (1425–1462) was plagued by the greatest civil war of Old Russian history. Vasili II was the youngest son of ...

    • 10 March 1415 Moscow, Russia
    • Sophia of Lithuania (1371-1453)
    • 27 March 1462
    • Maria Yaroslavna of Borovsk (c1418-1485)
  10. Vasili II of Moscow | Project Gutenberg Self-Publishing ...

    self.gutenberg.org/articles/Vasili_II_of_Moscow

    Vasili II of Moscow: lt;p|>||||| | | | | Vasily the Blind || | | || || | | |||Grand Prince of Moscow|| || | || | | ... World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of ...

  11. 5 Russian leaders with physical abnormalities - Russia Beyond

    www.rbth.com/history/332071-5-russian-leaders...
    • Vasily II of Moscow – Blindness
    • Peter The Great – Marfan Syndrome
    • Alexander I – Deafness
    • Joseph Stalin – Fused Fingers, Muscle Atrophy
    • Boris Yeltsin – Two Missing Fingers

    Vasily Vasilyevich (1415-1462) was the first Prince who ascended to the princely throne of the Grand Duchy of Vladimir (the most powerful Russian feudal state of the early 15th century) not in Vladimir, but in Moscow, a relatively young city at the time. From his reign Moscow became the principal Russian city – so we can consider Vasily II of Moscow the founder of the Moscow state. During his time, a fierce feudal war was being waged, and Vasily was blinded during this war, earning the moniker “the Blind.” Blinding was an old Byzantine way of taking revenge upon or neutralizing one’s enemy in a feudal war. In 1436, Vasily II himself ordered his servants to poke out the eye of Vasiliy Yuryevich (1421-1448), Prince of Zvenigorod. After that, Vasiliy Yuryevich became known as Vasiliy Kosoy (the Squint). He was maimed because he betrayed Vasily II of Moscow and tried to attack his army out of the blue. Vasily II was blinded by agents of Dmitry Shemyaka (?-1453), Vasiliy Yuryevich’s youn...

    Peter the Great (1672-1725) was 6ft 6 inches tall. Both his parents were a little taller than average. But Peter’s unnatural lankiness turned heads from his youngest days. As an adult, he stood two heads over any crowd. But he wasn’t sturdy built, had narrow shoulders, and his shoe size was US 7 (EU 40, UK 6.5). Not a single popular portrait of Peter reflects his real stature. His overly long arms and legs, and a small head were many times described by the contemporaries. Hypothetically, Peter could have had Marfan syndrome – a genetic disorder of the connective tissue. Asmedics confirm, people with Marfan tend to be tall and thin, with long arms, legs, fingers, and toes. They also typically have flexible joints and scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine. Peter was known to be obsessively active. As a kid, he couldn’t bear to sit on the Moscow tsar’s throne for hours during the court ceremonies. As an adult, he did everything very fast, even ate and walked fast, and kept himse...

    Grand Prince Alexander (1777-1825), son of Pavel I (1754-1801), was the grandson of Catherine the Great, who planned a stellar future for the boy. Almost immediately after birth, Catherine took the baby from his mother and raised him herself at her court. Even the boy's name was chosen by his paternal grandmother. Peter III, Catherine’s husband, murdered in 1762, was afraid of cannon shots even as an adult. On one hand, this was mighty strange for a nobleman who was raised partly in military training, on the other hand… quite explicable – the guy was just afraid of cannons from the very start. This was the subject of clandestine mockery and secret jokes of the entire Russian Imperial Court. Catherine, who had troubles in her family life with Peter, detested his infantile behavior and his playing toy soldiers all the time. That’s why she probably wanted her grandson to be a real man, accustomed to cannon fire. Russian historians are sure this was the reason for Alexander’s famous dea...

    Joseph Stalin really had something to hide. He had syndactyly – his second and third toes were fused. At the age of five, Stalin suffered smallpox, causing extensive pockmarking over his face – and hours of meticulous work for retouchers who edited the General Secretary’s photos for newspaper publications. Vyacheslav Molotov in his book of interviews “140 conversations with Molotov” remembered Stalin telling him that in 1913 while he was in exile in the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai, the villagers there nicknamed him Os’ka (diminutive for Iosif) the Rough – because of the pockmarks and maybe because he had a lame left arm. At the age of six Stalin was hit by a phaeton - a light open carriage - while crossing the street. He suffered severe injuries in his left arm and his head. After this, his left arm was only half as strong as his right one and he couldn’t properly lift it or hold it straight. With age, he also started feeling constant itching and pain in the fingers of h...

    Boris Yeltsin (1931-2007), the first President of the Russian Federation, lost two fingers when he was a teenager. There’s no mystery to how it happened: Yeltsin wrote about it in his autobiography “Confession on a Given Theme” (1990). “During the war (Yeltsin was 10 at the beginning of the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945), all the lads wanted to go to the front lines, but nobody let us, obviously. We made guns, rifles, even a cannon. We decided to procure some grenades and dismantle them, to study and understand what’s inside. So I volunteered to sneak inside the church (where the military warehouse was). After dark, I sneaked through three barbed wire perimeters and, while the sentry was at the other side of the building, I hand sawed the bars over a window. Got inside, took two RGD-33 hand grenades and got away safely. I was lucky – the sentry would have shot without warning. We went to the forest, 60 kilometers away from there, and started dismantling the grenades. I persuaded...