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  1. W. H. Auden war der Sohn eines Arztes und einer Krankenschwester. Am bekanntesten wurde Auden als Lyriker – einige Gedichte schrieb er schon mit 13 Jahren. Daneben verfasste er eine Vielzahl an Kritiken und Essays sowie, zusammen mit seinem Freund Christopher Isherwood , den er mit 18 Jahren kennenlernte, einige Dramen (zwei von Benjamin ...

  2. W H Auden Follow Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York, England, in 1907, he moved to Birmingham with his family during his childhood and was later educated at Christ Church, Oxford. As a young man he was influenced by the poetry of Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, as well as William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Old English verse.

  3. W. H. Auden was admired for his unsurpassed technical virtuosity and ability to write poems in nearly every imaginable verse form; his incorporation of popular culture, current events, and vernacular speech in his work; and also for the vast range of his intellect, which drew easily from an extraordinary variety of literatures, art forms, social and political theories, and scientific and ...

  4. W. H. Auden was admired for his unsurpassed technical virtuosity and ability to write poems in nearly every imaginable verse form; his incorporation of popular culture, current events, and vernacular speech in his work; and also for the vast range of his intellect, which drew easily from an extraordinary variety of literatures, art forms, social and political theories, and scientific and ...

  5. W H Auden Follow Wystan Hugh Auden was born in York, England, in 1907, he moved to Birmingham with his family during his childhood and was later educated at Christ Church, Oxford. As a young man he was influenced by the poetry of Thomas Hardy and Robert Frost, as well as William Blake, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Old English verse.

  6. ‘In Memory of W.B. Yeats’ by W. H. Auden is a three-part poem that is further divided into stanzas of different lengths. The first part of the poem contains six stanzas, the second: one and the third: six again. Auden does not make use of a rhyme scheme in the first two parts of the poem but in the third he does. This makes sense ...

  7. 'Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone' Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone, Silence the pianos and with muffled drum Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

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