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  2. organ - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org › wiki › organ
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    Etymology

    From Middle English organe, from Old French organe, from Latin organum, from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon, “an instrument, implement, tool, also an organ of sense or apprehension, an organ of the body, also a musical instrument, an organ”), from Proto-Indo-European *werǵ-. Doublet of orgue.

    Pronunciation

    1. (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹ.ɡən/ 2. (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɔː.ɡən/ 3. Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)ɡən 4. Hyphenation: or‧gan

    Noun

    organ (plural organs) 1. A larger part of an organism, composed of tissues that perform similar functions.quotations ▼ 1.1. 2018, Sandeep Jauhar, Heart: a History, →ISBN, page 98: 1.1.1. No matter the extraordinary progress that has been made in heart surgery over the past century, the heart remains a vulnerable organ. 2. (by extension) A body of an organizationdedicated to the performing of certain functions. 3. (music) A musical instrument that has multiple pipes which play when a key is pr...

    Noun

    organ (plural organs) 1. Alternative form of organe

    References

    1. “organ(e (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-02.

    Etymology

    From Latin organum, a borrowing from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon),

    Noun

    organ n (definite singular organet, indefinite plural organ or organer, definite plural organa or organene) 1. (anatomy, biology) an organ 2. an organ (publication which represents an organisation) 3. a body (e.g. an advisory body)

    See also

    1. orgel (musical instrument)

    Etymology

    From Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon), via Latin organum

    Noun

    organ n (definite singular organet, indefinite plural organ, definite plural organa) 1. (anatomy, biology) an organ 2. an organ (publication which represents an organisation) 3. a body (e.g. an advisory body)

    See also

    1. orgel (musical instrument)

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ˈɔr.ɡan/

    Noun

    organ m inan 1. organ, part of an organism 2. (by extension)unit of government dedicated to a specific function 3. (politics) organ, official publication of a politicalorganization

    Etymology

    From Byzantine Greek ὄργανος (órganos), from Ancient Greek ὄργανον (órganon), partly through the intermediate of Slavic *orъganъ. Some senses also based on French orgue (cf. orgă), Italian organum, Italian organo.

    Noun

    organ n (plural organe) 1. organ (part of organism) 2. (archaic) organ (musical instrument)

    Pronunciation

    1. IPA(key): /ǒrɡaːn/ 2. Hyphenation: or‧gan

    Noun

    òrgān m (Cyrillic spelling о̀рга̄н) 1. organ(part of an organism)

    Noun

    organ n 1. (anatomy) an organ(a part of the body) 2. (dated) a voice (of a singer or actor) 2.1. Hon förenade med ett utmärkt teateryttre en hög grad af intelligens, en ypperlig organ och en förträfflig deklamationskonst 2.1.1. She combined with excellent theatrical looks a high degree of intelligence, an extraordinary voice and a splendid mastery of declamation 3. an organ; a newspaper(of an organization, i.e. its voice)

    Anagrams

    1. argon

  3. Aryan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Aryan

    2 days ago · The meaning of 'Aryan' that was adopted into the English language in the late 18th century was the one associated with the technical term used in comparative philology, which in turn had the same meaning as that evident in the very oldest Old Indo-Aryan usage, i.e. as a (self-) identifier of "(speakers of) Indo-Aryan languages".

  4. Bagpipes - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Bagpipes

    3 days ago · Bagpipes are a woodwind instrument using enclosed reeds fed from a constant reservoir of air in the form of a bag. The Scottish Great Highland bagpipes are the best known examples in the Anglophone world, but people have played bagpipes for centuries throughout large parts of Europe, Anatolia, the Caucasus, Northern Africa, Western Asia, and around the Persian Gulf.

    • 422.112, (Reed aerophone with conical bore)
  5. Borg - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Borg

    3 days ago · The origin of the Borg is never made clear, though they are portrayed as having existed for hundreds of thousands of years (as attested by Guinan and the Borg Queen). In Star Trek: First Contact , the Borg Queen merely states that the Borg were once much like humanity, "flawed and weak", but gradually developed into a partially synthetic ...

  6. United Nations - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › United_Nations

    6 days ago · Below the six organs sit, in the words of the author Linda Fasulo, "an amazing collection of entities and organizations, some of which are actually older than the UN itself and operate with almost complete independence from it". These include specialized agencies, research, and training institutions, programs and funds, and other UN entities.

  7. Octopus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Octopus

    6 days ago · Octopus (standard plural octopuses) relates to approximately 300 species of soft-bodied, eight-limbed molluscs of the order Octopoda (/ ɒ k ˈ t ɒ p ə d ə /, ok-TO-pə-də).The order is grouped within the class Cephalopoda with squids, cuttlefish, and nautiloids.

  8. Transsexual - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Transsexual

    Apr 07, 2021 · The word transsexual is most often used as an adjective rather than a noun – a "transsexual person" rather than simply "a transsexual". [citation needed] As of 2018, use of the noun form (e.g. referring to people as transsexuals) is often deprecated by those in the transsexual community.

  9. Street performance - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Street_performance

    2 days ago · The verb to busk, from the word busker, comes from the Spanish root word buscar, with the meaning "to seek". The Spanish word buscar in turn evolved from the Indo-European word *bhudh-skō ("to win, conquer"). It was used for many street acts, and was the title of a famous Spanish book about one of them, El Buscón. Today, the word is still ...

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