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  1. Gauge | railroad track | Britannica

    www.britannica.com/technology/gauge-railroad-track

    The gauge, or distance between the inside faces of the running rails, can affect the cost of building and equipping a railroad. About 60 percent of the world’s railroad mileage has been built to standard gauge, 1,435 mm (4 feet 8.5 inches). However, a considerable mileage…

  2. Fw: The standard railroad gauge - Google Groups

    groups.google.com/d/topic/tokyo1964/BPw_jL65bAk

    The standard railroad gauge (distance between the rails) used most often internationally is 4 feet, 8.5 inches. That's an exceedingly odd number. Why was that gauge used? Because that's the way they built them in England, and English expatriates designed the U.S. Railroads.

  3. Record Railroad Routes: Highest, Steepest & Longest

    www.railserve.com/stats_records/highest_steepest...

    Standard gauge is used for most railroads in North America, Australia, China, and Europe (except Ireland, Spain, Portugal & Finland), plus most high speed rail applications worldwide. What is the world's widest track gauge in use today?

  4. The Railroad Gauge - Overland Trail

    www.over-land.com/rrgauge.html

    The United States standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches derives from the original specification for an Imperial Roman army war chariot. Specs and Bureaucracies live forever. So, the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what horse's Ass came up with it, you may be exactly right.

  5. What was the ultimate feat that brought down the German ...

    www.quora.com/What-was-the-ultimate-feat-that...

    Lack of captured Soviet rolling stock. The standard railroad track gauge is 1435 mm in Europe, but in the Soviet Union, it was 1520 mm. The Germans assumed their advance would go so well they would easily capture enough rolling stock to keep their...

  6. Track gauge question - RAILROAD.NET

    railroad.net/viewtopic.php?t=166537

    Originally the individual railroads made their own choice of gauge, with many adopting the European standard; the Federal Government got into it when Abraham Lincoln ruled that the Overland Route (Union Pacific and Central Pacific) would be standard gauge. (Maury Klein, in his history of the UP.)

  7. Narrow-gauge railway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narrow-gauge_railroad

    A narrow-gauge railway (narrow-gauge railroad in the US) is a railway with a track gauge narrower than standard 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1 ⁄ 2 in).Most narrow-gauge railways are between 600 mm (1 ft 11 5 ⁄ 8 in) and 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in).

  8. 5 ft 6 in gauge railway - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_gauge

    Canada became the first British colony, in the 1850s, to use 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) broad gauge.It was known as the "Provincial gauge" in Canada. The earliest railways in Canada, including the 1836 Champlain and St. Lawrence and 1847 Montreal and Lachine Railway however, were built to standard gauge.

  9. A Tale of Gauge (or, How Wide is a Railroad?) – Starfire Rail

    starfirerail.com/a-tale-of-gauge-or-how-wide-is...

    Nov 01, 2016 · A date was chosen and a general plan of action formulated. The “standardgauge in this case was not the U.S. Standard of 4′-8 1/2”, however. The Pennsylvania Railroad had adopted a gauge of 4′-9”, which proved to work adequately in interchange with rolling stock designed for 4′-8 1/2”.

  10. Why is US standard railroad gauge 4' 8.5" - CSE

    www.cse.iitk.ac.in/users/dheeraj/ir/rly-gauge.html

    The United State standard railroad gauge of 4 feet, 8.5 inches derives from the original specification for an Imperial Roman army war chariot. Specs and Bureaucracies live forever. So, the next time you are handed a specification and wonder what horse's ass came up with it, you may be exactly right.