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  1. Eccleston Delph - New rules 2021 - Eccleston Delph

    www.thedelph.com › index › newrules2021

    May 17, 2021 · Eccleston Delph - New rules 2021 - Eccleston Delph. Coronavirus rules updated 17th May 2021. THE DELPH IS NOW OPEN FOR DIVING AND SWIMMERS. THE CAFE IS NOW FULLY OPEN SORRY WE CANNOT ALLOW WALKING AROUND THE QUARRY OR FISH FEEDING AT THE MOMENT AND WE ASK YOU TO PLEASE RESPECT THIS DECISION. You are asked to read the following carefully before ...

  2. Stone Delph – Gazetteer – CanalPlanAC

    canalplan.co.uk › place › hns8

    May 16, 2021 · [Eccleston Quarry] Eccleston, Lancashire. It is also called Eccleston Delph and Eccy Delph (pronounced "ekky"). It is an old stone quarry that flooded. It is a popular site for [Listed buildings in Saddleworth to 1800] areas to the east of Oldham.

  3. Dive site the Borgny provides for some excellent scuba diving ...

    united-kingdom.greatestdivesites.com › england

    May 18, 2021 · The Borgny was sunk on the 22th of February 1918 by a German submarine. She was a Norwegian steam driven merchantman of 1,149 gross tons. She was built in 1909 and measured 228ft long with a 36ft beam. Located twisted and broken in a sandy gravel at a depth of 27m, rising up by 5 meters.

  4. Chorley | British History Online

    www.british-history.ac.uk › vch › lancs
    • Manors
    • Borough
    • Church
    • Advowson
    • Charities

    As a portion of the Croston lordshipgranted by Roger de Montbegon to hishalf-brother John Malherbe, CHORLEY,continuing to form part of the Hornby fee, was heldby William de la Mare and his heirs, who in latertimes were Fleming (then Hesketh) and Ashton ofCroston. (fn. 26) Thus in 1632 a free rent of 10s. a yearwas due from Chorley to Thomas Ashton. (fn. 27)This,as will be seen, was a moiety of the service to berendered. The immediate lordship of Chorley, which seemsto have descended to two co-heirs, was about 1250acquired by William de Ferrers Earl of Derby andlord of the district between Ribble and Mersey.Part at least of the transaction is recorded in fines of1251 and 1252, by one of which he obtained 30 acresof land in Chorley from Herbert de Lawton andMabel his wife, agreeing to pay a rent of ½d. to theheirs of Mabel, and by theother 4 oxgangs of land fromWilliam Bussel and Alice hiswife, the like rent of ½d. beingpayable to Alice's heirs. (fn. 28) Chorley is named in the granto...

    As will have been noticed fromvarious allusions in the foregoingaccount of the manor, a boroughexisted at Chorley in the 13th century. It wasperhaps created by William de Ferrers soon after1250. In 1257, while his manors were in thehands of Prince Edward, the bailiff rendered accountof the assized rent of 'the borough of Chorley,'48s. 5d. (fn. 230) Each burgage rendered 12d. a year tothe lord, (fn. 231) and probably had some small piece ofland attached to it, as in other places. The borough,however, does not seem to have made any advancetowards independence, though the lordship of themanor was divided and the lords absentees. Burgagescontinue to be mentioned down to the 16thcentury, (fn. 232)after which the use of the term died out. The grant of a market and fair does not seem tohave been preserved, but in 1498 Lord Strange andJoan his wife, Sir Edward Stanley and Sir RichardShireburne were summoned to show by what rightthey claimed a market every Tuesday and a fairon the vigil, fea...

    The church of ST. LAWRENCEstands at the north side of the town,the ground falling from it on its northand west sides. The road here descends somewhatabruptly, (fn. 245) and from a low level a flight of stonesteps led from a doorway, still existing, to a formerentrance at the north-west end of the building. Thechurch consists of a chancel with north vestry andsouth aisle, nave with wide north and south aislesunder separate gabled roofs, south porch and westerntower. Only the chancel, nave and tower, however,belong to the original structure, and of this very littleof the ancient work remains externally except in thestonework of the tower and in the nave gable andnorth wall of the chancel. Up to 1859–61, whenthe aisles were erected and other alterations tookplace, the building was a small structure consisting ofa chancel 32 ft. by 16 ft. 3 in., nave 57 ft. 6 in. by27 ft. 6 in., and west tower 10 ft. by 9 ft., (fn. 246)datingprobably from the beginning of the 15th century. The tower is...

    Nothing is positively known ofthe first erection of a chapel of easeat Chorley, but it may be observedthat no chapel is mentioned in a petition of 1355,when William de Exeter, then rector of Croston,desired the king to allow Roger de Farington toalienate an acre of his land so that a tithe-barnmight be built at Chorley. (fn. 255) Yet soon afterwards,in 1362, one of the plague years, there was a chapelthere, for the inhabitants desired the bishop that itmight be dedicated; the bishop allowed that allsacraments and sacramentals might be administeredtherein. The rector of Croston, William de Huntlow, at the same time agreed to find a chaplain. (fn. 256) The chapel is mentioned again a few years later,when a place was reserved for William de Chorleyaccording to a deed already quoted. In 1393–4there was an affray there. (fn. 257) The gift of relics in1443 is the only incident recorded in the nextcentury. There is a casual reference to the use ofthe church as a court-house in 1538. (fn. 2...

    Official inquiries into the localcharities were made in 1826 and1898. The report of the latter,which includes a reprint of the earlier one, furnishesthe following details:— The poor's lands were purchased by gifts fromWilliam Hodgson (1624) and later benefactors.Hodgson gave £100, spent on lands on the eastside of Eaves Lane and at Botany Bay. Theworkhouse was built upon part of the land in 1789,other charitable funds being used, and the overseerspaid a rent for it. The income was distributed inmoney doles. William Mayson in 1638 left a cottageand land at Ingol near Preston for the poor—Duxbury having a moiety of the net income (£18 in1826)—and these funds, with later benefactions,including Hugh Cooper's almshouses (1682), werein 1883 amalgamated by authority of the CharityCommissioners. Hugh Cooper (fn. 303) left a rent-charge of £6 upon hislands called Stump, to be paid to 'six poor persons,either men or women, being Protestants, and such asusually frequented the parochial chapel...

  5. mb21 - The Transmission Gallery

    tx.mb21.co.uk › emley › emley-facts

    May 23, 2021 · Overall depth of foundations: 6.1 m (20 ft) Weight of transmitting aerial structure: 63 tonnes: Loss in co-axial feeder: 1.5 dB: Collapse of previous mast: 19-Mar-1969: Initial briefing for new structure: 16-May-1969: Start of design work: June 1969: Contractor on site : August 1969: Concrete structure completed: September 1970

  6. Sonar - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Variable_depth_sonar

    Jun 04, 2021 · Sonar ( sound navigation and ranging) is a technique that uses sound propagation (usually underwater, as in submarine navigation) to navigate, communicate with or detect objects on or under the surface of the water, such as other vessels. Two types of technology share the name "sonar": passive sonar is essentially listening for the sound made ...

  7. Kaikō ROV Information - webot.org

    webot.org › info › en

    May 19, 2021 · Kaikō (海溝, "Ocean Trench") was a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) built by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) for exploration of the

  8. Surface-supplied diving - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Surface-supplied_diving

    4 days ago · Surface-supplied diving equipment and techniques are mainly used in professional diving due to the greater cost and complexity of owning and operating the equipment. This type of equipment is used in saturation diving, as the gas supply is relatively secure, and the diver can not bail out to the surface, and for diving in contaminated water, where the diver must be protected from the ...

  9. Radnor - Radnorshire | British History Online

    www.british-history.ac.uk › topographical-dict
    • Radnor (New), Or Maesyved
    • Radnor
    • Radnorshire

    RADNOR (NEW),or MAESYVED, a smalltown, a parish, and a borough having exclusivejurisdiction, formerly ofsufficient importance tohave given name to thecounty of Radnor, inSouth Wales, 8 miles(W. S. W.) from Presteign,and 157 (W. N. W.) fromLondon; the parish containing 478 inhabitants. The Welsh name of thisancient town, Maesyved, signifies in English "theimbibing or absorbent meadow." Welsh names arefrequently descriptive of the places to which they areattached, and such appears to be the case in thepresent instance: the little river Somergill, during agreat part of the year, sinks into the gravel in theimmediate vicinity of the town, and thence pursuesan underground course until, meeting with a bed ofclay, it is thrown up in several strong and deepsprings, giving rise, at a distance of nearly threemiles, to Hendwell Pool. It is conjectured, however, by persona conversant with the ancient historyof Wales, that the original appellation was MaesHyvaidd, and that the district was so ca...

    RADNOR (OLD), a parish, comprising thetownships of Ednol, Evenjob with Bareland, Kinnerton with Badland, Old Radnor, Walton, and partof Harpton, in the liberties of the borough of NewRadnor, union of Kington, county of Radnor,South Wales, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from New Radnor;containing 1744 inhabitants. This place by theWelsh is called Pencraig, a name it derives from thesituation of its church on the summit of a rock. Itwas anciently of some importance, and had a castle,which Sir Richard Colt Hoare identifies, but notsatisfactorily, with that mentioned by Giraldus Cambriensis under the appellation of "Cruker." Theparish is of great extent, comprising 10,069a. 3r. 9p.,of which 7700 acres are titheable. It is intersected bya stream called Somergill, and also by the Hendwell,a brook issuing from a small lake of the same name,which abounds with excellent trout and eels. Thesurface is principally flat, partly undulated, and insome places rising into hills of considerable elevation;the lan...

    RADNORSHIRE, an inland county of SouthWales, bounded on the north side by the county ofMontgomery (in North Wales), on the west byCardiganshire, on the south-west and south sides byBrecknockshire, on the east by the English countyof Hereford, and on the north-east by that of Salop.It extends from 52° 2ft. to 52° 27ft. (N. Lat.), and from2° 59ft. to 3° 45ft. (W. Lon.), and comprises an area,according to Mr. Carey's Communications to theBoard of Agriculture, of three hundred and ninetysquare miles, or two hundred and forty-nine thousand six hundred statute acres. It contains 4716inhabited houses, 225 uninhabited, and 19 in courseof erection; and the population is 25,356, of whichnumber, 12,826 are males, and 12,530 females. Theannual value of real property assessed to the property and income tax, for the year ending April1843, was as follows: lands, £107,648; houses,£14,864; tithes, £6039; railway property, £316;quarries, £79; manors, £40: making a total for thecounty, of £128,986. As...

  10. Local News | My Canyon Lake

    mycanyonlake.com › local-news › page

    May 25, 2021 · The Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) for Comal County was at 491 on Thursday -- and is projected to reach 500 by week's end. Every 100 points of the KBDI is roughly equivalent to an inch of dry soil depth.

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