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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Wilhelm_WienWilhelm Wien - Wikipedia

    Wilhelm Wien. Wilhelm Carl Werner Otto Fritz Franz Wien ( German pronunciation: [ˈvɪlhɛlm ˈviːn] ⓘ; 13 January 1864 – 30 August 1928) was a German physicist who, in 1893, used theories about heat and electromagnetism to deduce Wien's displacement law, which calculates the emission of a blackbody at any temperature from the emission at ...

  2. Apr 16, 2024 · Wilhelm Wien (born January 13, 1864, Gaffken, Prussia [now Parusnoye, Russia]—died August 30, 1928, Munich, Germany) was a German physicist who received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1911 for his displacement law concerning the radiation emitted by the perfectly efficient blackbody (a surface that absorbs all radiant energy falling on it).

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  3. Wilhelm Wien was born on January 13, 1864 at Fischhausen, in East Prussia. He was the son of the landowner Carl Wien, and seemed destined for the life of a gentleman farmer, but an economic crisis and his own secret sense of vocation led him to University studies. When in 1866 his parents moved to Drachstein, in the Rastenburg district of East ...

  4. Jan 13, 2016 · Wilhelm Wien. The Nobel Prize in Physics 1911. Born: 13 January 1864, Gaffken, Prussia (now Parusnoye, Russia) Died: 30 August 1928, Munich, Germany. Affiliation at the time of the award: Würzburg University, Würzburg, Germany. Prize motivation: “for his discoveries regarding the laws governing the radiation of heat”.

  5. Biography. Wilhelm Wien was the only child of Carl Wien and Caroline Gertz who were both of noble Prussian birth. It was his parents' sense of social propriety that made them give their son six given names. In later life, Wilhelm Wien was known as 'Willy' to his friends and colleagues. Carl Wien was a gentleman farmer and landowner, and Wilhelm ...

  6. The Sommerfeld theory has the great advantage that it attempts to invest the universal constant h of the Planck radiation theory with physical significance. It has the disadvantage that it has been applied so far only to electron emission and absorption, but cannot yet solve the problem of thermal radiation.

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  8. May 8, 2018 · As the absolute temperature increases, the wavelength of emitted radiation becomes shorter. Wilhelm Wien [1] (vĬl´hĕlm vēn), 1864–1928, German physicist. He was professor at the universities of Giessen (1899), Würzburg (1900–1920), and Munich (from 1920). He received the 1911 Nobel Prize [2] in Physics for his studies on the radiation ...

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