Yahoo Web Search

  1. Zita of Bourbon-Parma - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Zita_of_Bourbon-Parma

    Zita of Bourbon-Parma (Zita Maria delle Grazie Adelgonda Micaela Raffaela Gabriella Giuseppina Antonia Luisa Agnese; 9 May 1892 – 14 March 1989) was the wife of Charles, the last monarch of Austria-Hungary. As such, she was the last Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary, in addition to other titles.

  2. Zita of Bourbon-Parma (1892-1989) - Find A Grave Memorial

    www.findagrave.com › memorial › 7179

    Austro-Hungarian Monarch. Born Zita Marie der Gnaden Adelgunde Michaele Raphaelle Gabrielle Josphine Antonie Luise Agnes delle Grazie di Borbone, Principessa di Parma the daughter of Roberto I di Borbone, Duca di Parma and his second wife, Maria Antonia Adelaide de Bragança, Infanta de Portugal at Villa Pianore,...

    • 9 May 1892, Capezzano Pianore, Provincia di Lucca, Toscana, Italy
    • Gruftkapelle, the one after Franz Josef's Gruft
    • 14 Mar 1989 (aged 96), Zizers, Bezirk Landquart, Graubünden, Switzerland
    • Vienna, Vienna (Wien)
  3. Zita of Bourbon-Parma | Die Welt der Habsburger

    www.habsburger.net › habsburg › zita-bourbon-parma

    Zita of Bourbon-Parma. As consort of Emperor Karl I, Empress of Austria; Queen of Hungary. Born 9 May 1892 in Pianore, Province of Lucca, Tuscany (I) Died 14 March 1989 in Zizers, Canton of Grisons (CH) Zita married the future emperor Karl I in 1911. Their eldest son was Otto Habsburg-Lorraine.

  4. The Last Empress - Zita of Bourbon-Parma - History of Royal Women

    www.historyofroyalwomen.com › zita-of-bourbon

    Jun 29, 2017 · The Last Empress – Zita of Bourbon-Parma. Zita of Bourbon-Parma was born on 9 May 1892 in the Reale Villa della Pianore as the daughter of Robert I, Duke of Parma and Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal. She was given the names Zita Maria delle Grazie Adelgonda Micaela Raffaela Gabriella Giuseppina Antonia Luisa Agnese at her baptism on 11 May.

  5. Zita of Bourbon-Parma - Infogalactic: the planetary knowledge ...

    infogalactic.com › info › Zita_of_Bourbon-Parma
    • Early Life
    • Marriage
    • Wife of The Heir to Austrian Throne
    • Empress and Queen
    • Exile
    • Widowhood
    • Post-War
    • Cause of Beatification
    • Titles and Styles
    • Honours

    Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma was born at the Villa Pianore in the Italian Province of Lucca, 9 May 1892.:1 The unusual name Zita was given her after a popular Italian Saint who had lived in Tuscany in the 13th century.:16 She was the third daughter and fifth child of the deposed Robert I, Duke of Parma and his second wife, Maria Antonia of Portugal, a daughter of king Miguel of Portugal and Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. Zita's father had lost his throne as a result of the movement for Italian unification in 1859 when he was still a child.:1 He fathered twelve children during his first marriage to Maria Pia of the Two Sicilies (six of whom were mentally retarded, and three of whom died young).:1 Duke Robert became a widower in 1882, and two years later he married Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal, Zita's mother.:1 The second marriage produced a further twelve children. Zita was the 17th child among Duke Robert's 24 children. Robert moved his large family between Villa...

    In the close vicinity of Schwarzau castle was the Villa Wartholz, residence of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria, Zita’s maternal aunt.:3 She was the stepmother of Archduke Otto, who died in 1906, and the step-grandmother of Archduke Charles of Austria-Este, at that time second-in-line to the Austrian throne. The two daughters of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria were Zita’s first cousins and Charles’ half-aunts. They had met as children but did not see one another for almost ten years, as each pursued their education. In 1909, his Dragoon regiment was stationed at Brandeis an der Elbe (Brandýs on the Elbe), from where he visited his aunt at Franzensbad.:5 It was during one of these visits that Charles and Zita became reacquainted.:5 Charles was under pressure to marry (Franz Ferdinand, his uncle and first-in-line, had married morganatically, and his children were excluded from the throne) and Zita had a suitably royal genealogy.:16 Zita later recalled, "We were of course glad...

    At this time, Archduke Charles was in his twenties and did not expect to become emperor for some time, especially while Franz Ferdinand remained in good health. This changed on 28 June 1914 when the heir and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo by Bosnian Serb nationalists. Charles and Zita received the news by telegram that day. She said of her husband, "Though it was a beautiful day, I saw his face go white in the sun.:30 In the war that followed, Charles was promoted to General in the Austrian army, taking command of the 20th Corps for an offensive in Tyrol.:36 The war was personally difficult for Zita, as several of her brothers fought on opposing sides in the conflict (Prince Felix and Prince René had joined the Austrian army, while Prince Sixtus and Prince Xavier lived in France before the war and enlisted in the Belgian army.:33 Also her country of birth, Italy, joined the war against Austria in 1915, and so rumours of the 'Italian' Zita began to be muttered. Even as...

    Charles and Zita were crowned in Budapest on 30 December 1916. Following the coronation there was a banquet, but after that the festivities ended, as the emperor and empress thought it wrong to have prolonged celebrations during a time of war.:55 At the beginning of the reign, Charles was more often than not away from Vienna, so he had a telephone line installed from Baden (where Charles's military headquarters were located) to the Hofburg. He called Zita several times a day whenever they were separated.:60 Zita had some influence on her husband and would discreetly attend audiences with the Prime Minister or military briefings,:50 and she had a special interest in social policy. However, military matters were the sole domain of Charles. Energetic and strong-willed, Zita accompanied her husband to the provinces and to the front, as well as occupying herself with charitable works and hospital visits to the war-wounded.:21

    After a difficult few months at Eckartsau, the Imperial Family received aid from an unexpected source. Prince Sixtus had met King George V and appealed to him to help the Habsburgs. George was reportedly moved by the request, it being only months since his imperial relatives in Russia had been executed by revolutionaries, and promised "We will immediately do what is necessary.":137 Several British Army officers were sent to help Charles, most notably Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Lisle Strutt, who was a grandson of Lord Belper and a former student at the University of Innsbruck.:139 On 19 March 1919, orders were received from the War Office to "get the Emperor out of Austria without delay". With some difficulty, Strutt managed to arrange a train to Switzerland, enabling the Emperor to leave the country with dignity without having to abdicate. Charles, Zita, their children and their household left Eckartsau on 24 March escorted by a detachment of British soldiers from the Honourable Arti...

    After Charles's death, the former Austrian imperial family were soon to move again. Alfonso XIII of Spain had approached the British Foreign Office via his ambassador in London, and they agreed to allow Zita and her seven (soon to be eight) children to relocate to Spain. Alfonso duly sent the warship Infanta Isabel to Funchal and this took them to Cadiz. They were then escorted to the Pardo Palace in Madrid, where shortly after her arrival Zita gave birth to a posthumous child, Archduchess Elisabeth.:274 Alfonso XIII offered his exiled Habsburg relatives the use of Palacio Uribarren at Lekeitio in the Bay of Biscay. This appealed to Zita, who did not want to be a heavy burden to the state that harboured her.:289 For the next six years Zita settled in Lekeitio, where she got on with the job of raising and educating her children.:219–220 They lived with straitened finances, mainly living on income from private property in Austria, income from a vineyard in Johannisberg, and voluntary...

    After a period of rest and recovery, Zita found herself regularly going back to Europe for the weddings of her children. She decided to move back to the continent full-time, in 1952, to Luxembourg, in order to look after her aging mother. Maria Antonia died at the age of 96 in 1959. The bishop of Chur proposed to Zita that she move into a residence that he administered (formerly a castle of the Counts de Salis) at Zizers, Graubünden in Switzerland. As the castle had enough space for visits from her large family, and a nearby chapel (a necessity for the devoutly Catholic Zita), she accepted with ease.:316 Zita occupied her final years with her family. Although the restrictions on the Habsburgs entering Austria had been lifted, this only applied to those born after 10 April 1919. This meant Zita could not attend the funeral of her daughter Adelheid in 1972, which was painful for her.:320 She also involved herself in the efforts to have her deceased husband, the "Peace Emperor" canonis...

    On 10 December 2009, Mgr Yves Le Saux, Bishop of Le Mans, France, opened the diocesan process for the beatification of Zita. Normally the diocesan process is conducted where an individual died. On 13 March 2006 and 4 March 2008, Bishop Le Saux's predecessor Mgr Jacques Maurice Faivre, had petitioned the Congregation for the Causes of Saints for an indult permitting the diocesan process to be conducted in Le Mans. On 11 April 2008 the Congregation, having received the assent of the Bishop of Chur, replied affirmatively to the request. Zita was in the habit of spending several months each year in the diocese of Le Mans at St. Cecilia's Abbey, Solesmes, where three of her sisters were nuns. The postulator for the cause is Father Cyrille Debris. The judge of the tribunal is Father Bruno Bonnet. The promoter of justice is the DominicanFather Philippe Toxe. The notary is Didier Le Gac.

    9 May 1892 – 21 October 1911: Her Royal HighnessPrincess Zita of Bourbon-Parma
    21 October 1911 – 21 November 1916: Her Imperial and Royal HighnessArchduchess and Princess Zita of Austria, Princess of Hungary and Bohemia, Princess of Bourbon-Parma
    21 November 1916 – 11 November 1918: Her Imperial and Royal Apostolic MajestyThe Empress of Austria, Apostolic Queen of Hungary
    11 November 1918 – 14 March 1989:

    She received the following orders: 1. Austria-Hungary : Dame (then Grand-Mistress) of the Order of the Starry Cross 2. Austria-Hungary : Dame Grand Cross (then Grand-Mistress) of the Order of Elizabeth She was the last grand mistress of these orders to be an effective empress.

  6. Zita of Bourbon-Parma | Indiana Jones Wiki | Fandom

    indianajones.fandom.com › wiki › Zita_of_Bourbon-Parma

    Zita of Bourbon-Parma was the last Empress of Austria. 1 Biography 2 Behind the scenes 3 Appearances 4 Notes and references 5 External links In 1917, Zita sent a letter to her brothers Sixtus and Xavier asking them to come to Vienna to convince her husband, Emperor Karl I, to agree to a separate...

  7. Zita of Bourbon-Parma wiki | TheReaderWiki

    thereaderwiki.com › en › Zita_of_Bourbon-Parma
    • Early Life
    • Marriage
    • Wife of The Heir to Austrian Throne
    • Empress and Queen
    • Exile
    • Widowhood
    • Post-War
    • Cause of Beatification and Canonization
    • Honours
    • Bibliography

    Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma was born at the Villa Pianore in the Italian Province of Lucca, 9 May 1892.:1 The unusual name Zita was given to her after Zita, a popular Italian Saint who had lived in Tuscany in the 13th century.:16 She was the third daughter and fifth child of the deposed Robert I, Duke of Parma and his second wife Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal, a daughter of King Miguel of Portugal and his wife Princess Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. Zita's father had lost his throne as a result of the movement for Italian unification in 1859 when he was still a child.:1 He fathered twelve children during his first marriage to Princess Maria Pia of the Two Sicilies (six of whom were mentally disabled, and three of whom died young).:1 Duke Robert became a widower in 1882, and two years later he married Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal, Zita's mother.:1 The second marriage produced a further twelve children. Zita was the 17th child among Duke Robert's 24 children. R...

    In the close vicinity of Schwarzau castle was the Villa Wartholz, residence of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria, Zita's maternal aunt.:3 She was the stepmother of Archduke Otto, who died in 1906, and the step-grandmother of Archduke Charles of Austria-Este, at that time second-in-line to the Austrian throne. The two daughters of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria were Zita's first cousins and Charles' half-aunts. They had met as children but did not see one another for almost ten years, as each pursued their education. In 1909, his Dragoon regiment was stationed at Brandeis an der Elbe (Brandýs on the Elbe), from where he visited his aunt at Franzensbad.:5 It was during one of these visits that Charles and Zita became reacquainted.:5 Charles was under pressure to marry (Franz Ferdinand, his uncle and first-in-line, had married morganatically, and his children were excluded from the throne) and Zita had a suitably royal genealogy.:16Zita later recalled: Archduke Charles travele...

    At this time, Archduke Charles was in his twenties and did not expect to become emperor for some time, especially while Franz Ferdinand remained in good health. This changed on 28 June 1914 when the heir and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo by Bosnian Serb nationalists. Charles and Zita received the news by telegram that day. She said of her husband, "Though it was a beautiful day, I saw his face go white in the sun.":30 In the war that followed, Charles was promoted to General in the Austrian army, taking command of the 20th Corps for an offensive in Tyrol.:36 The war was personally difficult for Zita, as several of her brothers fought on opposing sides in the conflict (Prince Felix and Prince René had joined the Austrian army, while Prince Sixtus and Prince Xavier lived in France before the war and enlisted in the Belgian army.):33 Also her country of birth, Italy, joined the war against Austria in 1915, and so rumours of the 'Italian' Zita began to be muttered. Even...

    Charles and Zita were crowned in Budapest on 30 December 1916. Following the coronation there was a banquet, but after that the festivities ended, as the emperor and empress thought it wrong to have prolonged celebrations during a time of war.:55 At the beginning of the reign, Charles was more often than not away from Vienna, so he had a telephone line installed from Baden (where Charles's military headquarters were located) to the Hofburg. He called Zita several times a day whenever they were separated.:60 Zita had some influence on her husband and would discreetly attend audiences with the Prime Minister or military briefings,:50 and she had a special interest in social policy. However, military matters were the sole domain of Charles. Energetic and strong-willed, Zita accompanied her husband to the provinces and to the front, as well as occupying herself with charitable works and hospital visits to the war-wounded.:21

    After a difficult few months at Eckartsau, the Imperial Family received aid from an unexpected source. Prince Sixtus had met King George V and appealed to him to help the Habsburgs. George was reportedly moved by the request, it being only months since his imperial relatives in Russia had been executed by revolutionaries, and promised "We will immediately do what is necessary.":137 Several British Army officers were sent to help Charles, most notably Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Lisle Strutt, who was a grandson of Lord Belper and a former student at the University of Innsbruck.:139 On 19 March 1919, orders were received from the War Office to "get the Emperor out of Austria without delay". With some difficulty, Strutt managed to arrange a train to Switzerland, enabling the Emperor to leave the country with dignity without having to abdicate. Charles, Zita, their children and their household left Eckartsau on 24 March escorted by a detachment of British soldiers from the Honourable Arti...

    After Charles's death, the former Austrian imperial family were soon to move again. Alfonso XIII of Spain had approached the British Foreign Office via his ambassador in London, and they agreed to allow Zita and her seven (soon to be eight) children to relocate to Spain. Alfonso duly sent the warship Infanta Isabel to Funchal and this took them to Cadiz. They were then escorted to the Pardo Palace in Madrid, where shortly after her arrival Zita gave birth to Archduchess Elisabeth.:274 Alfonso XIII offered his exiled Habsburg relatives the use of Palacio Uribarren at Lekeitio in the Bay of Biscay. This appealed to Zita, who did not want to be a heavy burden to the state that harboured her.:289 For the next six years Zita settled in Lekeitio, where she got on with the job of raising and educating her children.:219–220 They lived with straitened finances, mainly living on income from private property in Austria, income from a vineyard in Johannisberg in the Rhine Valley, and voluntary...

    After a period of rest and recovery, Zita found herself regularly going back to Europe for the weddings of her children. She decided to move back to the continent full-time, in 1952, to Luxembourg, in order to look after her aging mother. Maria Antonia died at the age of 96 in 1959. The bishop of Chur proposed to Zita that she move into a residence that he administered (formerly a castle of the Counts de Salis) at Zizers, Graubünden in Switzerland. As the castle had enough space for visits from her large family and a nearby chapel (a necessity for the devoutly Catholic Zita), she accepted with ease.:316 Zita occupied herself in her final years with her family. Although the restrictions on the Habsburgs entering Austria had been lifted, this only applied to those born after 10 April 1919. This meant Zita could not attend the funeral of her daughter Adelheid in 1972, which was painful for her.:320 She also involved herself in the efforts to have her deceased husband, the "Peace Empero...

    On 10 December 2009, Mgr Yves Le Saux, Bishop of Le Mans, France, opened the diocesan process for the beatification of Zita. Zita was in the habit of spending several months each year in the diocese of Le Mans at St. Cecilia's Abbey, Solesmes, where three of her sisters were nuns. The actor is the French Association pour la Béatification de l'Impératrice Zita. The postulator for the cause is Alexander Leonhardt. Vice postulator for Hungary is Catholic theologian Norbert Nagy. The judge of the tribunal is Bruno Bonnet. The promoter of justiceis François Scrive. With the opening of her cause, the late Empress has been accorded the title Servant of God.

    Beeche, Arturo & McIntosh, David. (2005). Empress Zita of Austria, Queen of Hungary (1892–1989)Eurohistory. ASIN: B000F1PHOI
    Bogle, James and Joanna. (1990). A Heart for Europe: The Lives of Emperor Charles and Empress Zita of Austria-Hungary, Fowler Wright, 1990, ISBN 0-85244-173-8
    Brook-Shepherd, Gordon. (1991). The Last Empress – The Life and Times of Zita of Austria-Hungary 1893–1989. Harper-Collins. ISBN 0-00-215861-2
    Harding, Bertita. (1939). Imperial Twilight: The Story of Karl and Zita of Hungary. Bobbs-Merrill Company Publishers. ASIN: B000J0DDQO
  8. Zita of Bourbon-Parma, Empress of Austria | Unofficial Royalty

    www.unofficialroyalty.com › zita-of-bourbon-parma-empress

    Apr 26, 2016 · Zita’s casket was borne to the Capuchin Church, where the Imperial Crypt is located, by the same coach she had walked behind during the funeral of Emperor Franz Joseph I in 1916. Over 200 Habsburg and Bourbon-Parma family members along with 8,000 other guests attended the funeral. Zita was buried in the Crypt Chapel of the Imperial Crypt.

  9. Zita Of Bourbon Parma Photos and Premium High Res Pictures ...

    www.gettyimages.com › photos › zita-of-bourbon-parma

    Zita of Bourbon-Parma was the wife of Emperor Charles of Austria, she was the last Empress of Austria, Queen of Hungary and Queen of Bohemia. Photographic portrait of Zita of Bourbon-Parma , Emperor Charles I of Austria and their eldest son Crown Prince Otto von Hasburg after the Coronation...

  10. May 08, 2021 · Zita of Bourbon-Parma, Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary, followed by a Presentation, Luncheon, and an Interview with HIRH Princess Maria-Anna

  11. People also search for