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  1. Nostratic languages - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nostratic_languages

    2 days ago · It typically comprises Kartvelian, Indo-European and Uralic languages; some languages from the disputed Altaic family; the Afroasiatic languages spoken in North Africa, the Horn of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and the Near East as well as the Dravidian languages of the Indian Subcontinent (sometimes also Elamo-Dravidian, which connects India ...

  2. Horn of Africa - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_the_Horn_of_Africa

    6 days ago · Horn of Africa; Countries and territories

  3. Semitic - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Semitic
    • Etymology
    • Adjective
    • See Also

    From Semite +‎ -ic (18th century), from German semitisch, from Ancient Greek Σημ (Sēm), from the Hebrew שֵׁם‎ (Šēm, “Shem”), the name of the eldest son of Noah in biblical tradition (Genesis 5.32, 6.10, 10.21), considered the forefather of the Semitic peoples. Perhaps derived from Akkadian 𒈬 (šumu, literally “name" or "son”). The word was coined and first applied to the Semitic languages by August Ludwig von Schlözerin 1781.

    Semitic (not comparable) 1. Of or pertaining to a subdivision of Afro-Asiatic Semitic languages: Amharic, Arabic, Aramaic, Syriac, Akkadian, Hebrew, Maltese, Tigrigna, Phoenicianetc. 2. Of or pertaining to the Semites; of or pertaining to one or more Semitic peoples.quotations ▼ 2.1. 2008, Gary A. Tobin, The Trouble with Textbooks, page 93: 2.1.1. On the other hand, scholars say that the Philistines were an Indo-European people not related to the SemiticPalestinians. 2.2. For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:Semitic. 2.1. (biblical) Of or pertaining to the descendants of Shem, the eldest of three sons of Noah. 2.2. (in particular) Of or pertaining to the Israeli, Jewish, or Hebrewpeople. 2.3. Of or pertaining to any of the religions which originated among the Semites; Abrahamic.quotations ▼ 2.3.1. 1893, George Thomas Bettany, Mohammedanism and Other Religions of Mediterranean Countries, page 45: 2.3.1.1. Thus we trace ever and again the similarities which are to be foun...

  4. Appendix:Aromanian Swadesh list - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Aromanian...

    5 days ago · Presentation [] For further information, including the full final version of the list, read the Wikipedia article: Swadesh list. American linguist Morris Swadesh believed that languages changed at measurable rates and that these could be determined even for languages without written precursors.

  5. ni - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ni
    • Albanian
    • Basque
    • Hungarian
    • Mandarin
    • Navajo
    • Norwegian Bokmål
    • Serbo-Croatian
    • Swedish
    • Uzbek
    • Vietnamese

    From Proto-Albanian *nū, from Proto-Indo-European *nū (“now”). Cognate to Sanskrit नू (nū, “now”). Often occurs in coordination with other particles, compare tani, nani, nime.

    ni 1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)quotations ▼ 1. 1989, Gorka Aulestia, Basque-English Dictionary, William A. Douglas, page 53 2. 2013, Patricio Urquizu Sarasua, Gramática de la lengua vasca, Universidad Nacional de Educación de Distancia, page 154

    Native development with a debated origin: 1. Shortened from nézd (“look!”) ~ nízd (a dialectal variant). 2. An onomatopoeia expressing astonishment.

    ni (Zhuyin ˙ㄋㄧ) 1. Nonstandard spelling of nī. 2. Nonstandard spelling of ní. 3. Nonstandard spelling of nǐ. 4. Nonstandard spelling of nì.

    ni 1. second person singular pronoun youquotations ▼ 1. Shí dóó ni ayóo ałk’is niidlį́. 2. second person singular possessive pronoun yoursquotations ▼ 1. Díí naaltsoos éí ni.

    From Old Norse níu (whence also Danish ni, Icelandic níu, Faroese níggju and Swedish nio) from Proto-Germanic *newun, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁néwn̥. Cognate with Gothic 𐌽𐌹𐌿𐌽 (niun); Old English niġon (English nine); Old Frisian nigun (West Frisian njoggen); Old High German niun (German neun).

    From Proto-Slavic *ni (“nor, not”), from Proto-Balto-Slavic *nej, from Proto-Indo-European *ney. Compare ni-, ne.

    Since 1661, through contraction of the Old Swedish verb suffix -(e)n (\\"yon\\") and the older pronoun I (\\"ye\\"), e.g. vissten I > visste ni (“did you know”). Compare Icelandic þér and þið which developed similarly. The Old Swedish ī, ir derive from Old Norse ír, variant of ér, þér, from Proto-Germanic *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́.

    ni (Cyrillic ни) 1. accusative case marker. It is placed after the direct object of a transitive verb.

    See này. This is one of many cases in which monophthongs were not diphthongized in Central Vietnamese, compare mày vs. mi, chấy vs. chí, nước vs. nác.

  6. Appendix:Hittite Swadesh list - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Hittite_Swadesh_list

    6 days ago · For further information, including the full final version of the list, read the Wikipedia article: Swadesh list. American linguist Morris Swadesh believed that languages changed at measurable rates and that these could be determined even for languages without written precursors.

  7. Somalis, Ethiopians, Eritreans Are Superior - Culture (4 ...

    www.nairaland.com/1316015/somalis-ethiopians...

    Feb 17, 2021 · somali is one of many languages like arabic, hebrew, amahara, tigrey that are afro asiatic cushitcs are the ones who ruled ethiopia, and the majority of ethiopians are cushitic, somalis originated from ethiopia just like their cousins oromo, and afar amahara are not cushitic you slowpoke, they are semetic same as the tigrey and the tigrinya

  8. dam - Wiktionary

    en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dam

    1 day ago · dam (plural, first-person possessive damku, second-person possessive dammu, third-person possessive damnya) dam , a structure placed across a flowing body of water to stop the flow or part of the flow, generally for purposes such as retaining or diverting some of the water or retarding the release of accumulated water to avoid abrupt flooding.

  9. Alt Left: Child Molestation and Child Rape Are Two Different ...

    beyondhighbrow.com/2021/02/17/child-molestation...

    Feb 17, 2021 · Child rape and child molestation are two different crimes. Child rape is quite rare. It’s is often a stranger and a weapon is often involved. The child may well be harmed or even killed. Now that feminists have weaponized the definition of men raping females to include everything but the kitchen sink, all molestation is being seen as “rape.”

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