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    • Background Rudolph Albert Kölliker
    • Embriology
    • Histology

    Rudolph Albert Kölliker was born in Zurich, Switzerland. His early education was carried on in Zurich, and he entered the university there in 1836. After two years, however, he moved to the University of Bonn, and later to that of Berlin, becoming a pupil of noted physiologists Johannes Peter Müller and of Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle. He graduated...

    Kölliker made substantial contributions to the study of zoology. While his earlier efforts were directed to the invertebrates, he soon passed on to the vertebrates, and studied the amphibians and mammalian embryos. He was among the first, if not the very first, to introduce into this branch of biological inquiry the newer microscopic technique the ...

    But neither zoology nor embryology furnished Kölliker’s chief claim to fame. He is best known for his contributions to histology, the knowledge of the minute structure of the animal tissues. Among his earlier results was the demonstration in 1847 that smooth or unstriated muscle is made up of distinct units, of nucleated muscle cells. In this work,...

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  3. Mar 19, 2024 · Copley Medal (1897) Subjects Of Study: cell. tissue. Rudolf Albert von Kölliker (born July 6, 1817, Zürich, Switz.—died Nov. 2, 1905, Würzburg, Ger.) was a Swiss embryologist and histologist, one of the first to interpret tissue structure in terms of cellular elements.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  4. Albert Kölliker was born in Zürich, Switzerland. His early education was carried on in Zürich, and he entered the university there in 1836. After two years, however, he moved to the University of Bonn, and later to that of Berlin, becoming a pupil of noted physiologists Johannes Peter Müller and of Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle.

    • Swiss
  5. Sep 30, 2022 · They were discovered in 1857 by Swiss scientist Albert von Kölliker and named in 1898 by Carl Benda, a German microbiologist who coined the name from the Greek “mitos-,” meaning “thread,” and “-chondros,” meaning “granule,” because mitochondria inside of a cell tend to form long dotted chains.

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